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I manage to reach halfway up the corner of the church before I get stuck. I can see where I need to go, but there are no firm handholds within reach. No, I'm not playing Assassin's Creed, though I half-wish I was. The church wall I'm clinging to like a fat spider overlooks Newhaven Harbour at the north end of Edinburgh. The old Gothic building houses the Alien Rock indoor climbing centre, its interior walls and vaulted ceilings covered in white plaster and fluorescent plastic climbing holds.

I thought I would be terrified if this happened. I'm not afraid of heights, but I can't handle unstable footing. Instead I'm just tired and frustrated. It started well enough - I climbed two starter routes without much trouble - but this is my third attempt on this route. My fiancée ascended it earlier with no problems, and a ten-year-old girl has just scurried up the wall beside me like a squirrel.

This somewhat rash transition from sedentary games journalist to human wallpaper is the final part of an investigation into the portrayal of climbing in games. I decided to try it for myself because of something said to me by Dana Harrington, an experienced climber and creator of the climbing game Solo Joe.

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Original author: 
Kyle Orland

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It's easy to write about games that can be compared to other games. "It's like Call of Duty, but in space," or "It's like Gran Turismo, but all the cars feel like they're made of styrofoam" or "It's like the tabletop game Labyrinth, but you're controlling a monkey in a plastic ball." The games that are the most fun to write about, though, are the ones where you struggle to come up with any suitable comparisons.

Sure, you can draw some links between Antichamber and games like Portal. Both games involve wandering through a sterile laboratory and trying to find your way out. Both involve using a gun that doesn't shoot bullets, but does help you find an exit indirectly. And both take place from a first-person perspective. But Antichamber's similarities to Portal—and to most other games—end there.

Understanding Antichamber means forgetting your understanding of pretty much everything you know about how the physical world works. First to go is the idea of object permanence that you developed as a baby. Turn around in Antichamber, and the hallway that was there a second ago can easily be a totally different room. Then the game starts to mess with your ideas of depth perception—you can fall for miles, only to end up just a few feet below where you started.

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Trepidity writes "AI systems can (sort of) paint and compose classical music, but can they design games? Slashdot looked at the question a few years ago, and several research groups now have experimental systems that design board games and platformers with varying levels of success. I've put together a survey of the AI game designers I know of, to round up what they can do so far (and what they can't). Are there any others out there? 'Pell's METAGAME is, to my knowledge, the first published game generator. He defines a generative space of games more general than chess, which he calls "symmetric, chess-like games." They're encoded in a representation specific to this genre, which is also symmetric by construction. By symmetric I mean that mechanics are specified only from the perspective of one player, with the starting positions and rules that apply to the other player always being the mirror of the first player's. The rules themselves are represented in a game grammar, and generation is done by stochastically sampling from that grammar, along with some checks for basic game playability, and generative-parameter knobs to tweak some aspects of what's likely to be generated.'"

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French skate company ANTIZ Skateboards have released a fun little two-and-a-half minute clip featuring team rider Dallas Rockvam, who also rides for Perus Wheels and Independent trucks. The video was filmed and edited by polohobodie. Watch above!


www.antizskateboards.com

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Skateboarder Aaron Homoki, who had a Thrasher cover not so long ago, has submitted a ridiculous 60-second clip as part of the X Games Real Street competition. Homoki filled the minute long video with an onslaught of huge tricks that have no doubt caused irreplaceable damage to his ankles. If you want to make it all worthwhile for him and get him that $50,000 prize, you can vote for him to win here.

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In the spirit of Japanese artist HAROSHI, the RETO (REcycle for TOmorrow) project used old broken skateboard decks to create a new surfboard. Björn Holm, the Finnish furniture designer behind the project, has been collecting the skateboards since last December, finally building up enough to make this 6' 4" fish-shaped surfboard. Check out the video above!

Source: FRESHNGOOD

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2636-1

Desillusion magazine and Nixon proudly present their latest video instalment “This is Andrew”, a video portrait paying tribute to US street skateboarder Andrew Reynolds. Growing up in a small town in Florida, Andrew started skateboarding at a very young age. Due to his exceptional talent – Reynolds won the first contest he ever entered – he drew the attention of the skate industry and landed on some of the top sponsored teams as a teenager. Following Tony Hawk and others to the Californian epicentre of skateboarding at the age of 18, he met fellow skateboarders like Jim Greco, Ali Boulala and Knox Godoy, later on known as the “Piss Drunx”, ruling the streets of LA.

http://vimeo.com/39201565

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