Skip navigation
Help

Robot

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
boesing

fge

As a novelist, Daniel Suarez spins dystopian tales of the future. But on the TEDGlobal stage, he talks us through a real-life scenario we all need to know more about: the rise of autonomous robotic weapons of war. Advanced drones, automated weapons and AI-powered intelligence-gathering tools, he suggests, could take the decision to make war out of the hands of humans.

http://www.ted.com/talks/daniel_suarez_the_kill_decision_shouldn_t_belon...

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
Unknown Lamer

cylonlover writes "Teaching a robot how to deal with real-world problems is a challenging task. There has been much progress in building robots that can precisely repeat individual tasks with a level of speed and accuracy impossible for human craftspeople. But there are many more tasks that could be done if robots could be supplied with even a limited amount of judgment. A robotics group led by Professor Sylvain Calinon at the Italian Institute of Technology is making progress in solving this problem and has developed a robot whose purpose in life is to help a person build an IKEA table."

Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None


Cable cars, algae bio-fuel cells, and urban agriculture are sandwiched into just a small slice of Arup's future skyscraper.

Rob Hunt/Arup

The urban buildings of the near-future will be tall, smart, adaptable, responsive, honest, modular, recyclable, clean, and deeply embedded into the systems of their host cities, if an imaginative vision from Arup's Foresight team is anything to judge by. In its evocatively titled It's Alive, Arup (the firm responsible for the structural design of the iconic Sydney Opera House) asks if we can imagine the urban building of the future while simultaneously presenting its take on the matter. The report contains plenty of ideas, albeit briefly stated, so I thought it would be fun to identify some of today's science and technology that has made it into Arup's skyscraper of tomorrow and discuss whether Arup's vision is more grounded in fact or fiction.


Arup's urban building of 2050 Rob Hunt/Arup

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times

Arup's future-scraper is the product of its time; a time 37 years from now that will suck and be awesome in approximately equal measures. Why suck? Because 37 years will see us through to the year 2050, and Arup shares (or perhaps borrows) the OECD's troubling forecast of a warming, overpopulated Earth hungry for, yet deficient in, essential resources. According to this narrative, there will be 9 billion people, with 6.3 billion living in towns and cities.

The good news is that we'll still have iPhones—or their future-proxies, at least. Arup describes the denizens of our future cities as "net-native adults" who have grown up with smart cities, smart clothes, and smart objects. The Internet of Things will be ubiquitous, Arup suggests; presumably to the point that it has been abbreviated simply to "things," the "Internet of" having been long since forgotten.

Read 25 remaining paragraphs | Comments

0
Your rating: None

robot woman

Manufacturers are already experimenting with robots. But within the next 10 years, we may start to see them pop up in classrooms, a deputy editor at The Futurist (a trends and forecasting magazine) recently told Business Insider.

That's because education is an industry that is especially ripe for change.

Schools often struggle with overcrowded classrooms, which means students aren't getting all the attention they need.

Patrick Tucker"We’re kidding ourselves in telling ourselves that that’s okay," Patrick Tucker says. "But any parent who is faced with the proposition of sticking their kid in a classroom with 64 other kids knows that’s not going to be a classroom where their kids will realize the best educational outcome."

Tucker points to experiments in Japan, where humans remotely operate robots to help the elderly.

"The potential is to increase the capability of very good teachers through these kind of platforms in the same way that the Japanese’s personal robotics scene right now is very much geared toward that," Tucker says. "Just making the right people more present in more places at once."

Still, Tucker doesn't think it's necessarily wise to have robot teachers in a classroom, but rather have a platform that lets a teacher talk to students when the teacher can't physically be there.

"I think that a certain amount of (experimentation with replacing teachers) is inevitable," Tucker says. "We can't yet say what the outcome of that experimentation will be."

SEE ALSO: Get Ready For Self-Driving Cars That Chauffeur Us Around

SEE ALSO: Roadmap To The Future

Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

0
Your rating: None

Roboy Child Robot

When it comes to building a robot, humanoid designs aren't always the best solution — specialized, nonhuman shapes often make it more effective, and the robot may fall into the frightening, quasi-human "uncanny valley" if it resembles a person. But Roboy, a project from the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the University of Zurich, isn't just meant to move like a human — it's being built in the nine months a child would take to gestate. The project started in June 2012; if all goes right, Roboy will be shown off during March's Robots on Tour exhibition in Zurich. The designers are also attempting to crowdfund development, selling space for logos or names on Roboy's body and other rewards for between 25 and 50,000 Swiss francs...

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None


TedxVienna - Federico Pistono - Robots Will Steal Your Job, but That's OK

www.tedxvienna.at www.facebook.com Federico Pistono is an author, social entrepreneur, scientific educator, activist, blogger, and aspiring filmmaker. He is author of the book Robots Will Steal Your Job, But That's OK: How to Survive the Economic Collapse and be Happy, which explores the impact that technological advances have on our lives, what it means to be happy, and provides suggestions on how to avoid a systemic collapse. He is Co-Founder of WiFli, a benefit corporation that seeks to provide universal access to information and knowledge via the Internet, for every person on the planet, focusing on the disenfranchised in emerging economies. He has a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from the University of Verona, he completed the Machine Learning online course at Stanford, and the Graduate Studies Program at Singularity University, NASA Ames Research Center. Federico is an award winning blogger/journalist and Italian Ambassador of Singularity University (having co-founded Axelera). He started social movements and non-profits focused on human rights, anti-corruption, environmental sustainability, and innovation for positive social change through exponential technologies. www.federicopistono.org
From:
TEDxTalks
Views:
2306

177
ratings
Time:
17:24
More in
News & Politics

0
Your rating: None


Meet Team Antipodes, the 2012 FIRST Tech Challenge Robot Design World Champions

Google Tech Talk November 30, 2012 Presented by Kjersti Chippindale and Violet Replicon from the FIRST Team Antipodes ABSTRACT Antipodes, a Bay-Area all-girl robotics team, will speak about their experiences designing, building and driving robots in FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) and how it's transformed their middle and high school experiences. This year their presentation will include an overview of their robot design process, which they have documented and now share with their fellow competitors. After their presentation, the girls will have 3 years of championship robots on display, answer any questions you might have, and let you try your hand at manning the controls. This is Team Antipodes' third Google Tech Talk. Instead of entering the competition this year, they are devoting their time to scale their impact by teaching and mentoring new competitors and recruiting new adult mentors to the program. If you have ever been interested in participating in the FIRST Robotics program, please consider attending this presentation. www.theonerobot.com www.usfirst.org
From:
GoogleTechTalks
Views:
1160

34
ratings
Time:
33:36
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None


Mind-controlled Machines: Jose del R. Millan at TEDxZurich

The idea of controlling machines not by manual operation, but by mere "thinking" (ie, the brain activity of human subjects) has always fascinated humankind. A brain-machine interface (BMI) makes this truly possible as it monitors the user's brain activity and translates their intentions into actions, such as moving a wheelchair or selecting a letter from a virtual keyboard. The central tenet of a BMI is the capability to distinguish different patterns of brain activity each being associated to a particular intention or mental task. This is a real challenge which is far from being solved! BMI holds a high, perhaps bold, promise: human augmentation through the acquisition of new brain capabilities that will allow us to communicate and interact with our environment directly by "thinking". This is particularly relevant for physically-disabled people but is not limited to them. Yet, how is it possible to fulfill this dream using a "noisy channel" like brain signals? Which are the principles that allow people operate complex brain-controlled robots over long periods of time? Jose del R. Millan is the Defitech Professor at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) where he explores the use of brain signals for multimodal interaction and, in particular, the development of non-invasive brain-controlled robots and neuroprostheses. In this multidisciplinary research effort, Dr. Millán is bringing together his pioneering work on the two fields of brain-machine interfaces <b>...</b>
From:
TEDxTalks
Views:
36

3
ratings
Time:
14:15
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None

Robots are taking over factories around the world.

The International Federation of Robots tracks the growth in usage, production, and trade in robots, and the numbers have grown at a tantalizing rate. Robot sales jumped by 38 percent in 2011, and the worldwide stock of robots is estimated to be in the range of 1,153,000 - 1,400,000 units — up from a minimum stock of 1,021,000 units in 2009.

South Korea lead the way in robot density in 2011, with 347 robots per 10,000 workers in the manufacturing industry. What's more impressive is the tremendous spike in robot density; South Korea had 287 robots per 10,000 workers in 2010.

Here are the countries where robots are taking over manufacturing:

Robot population graph DO NOT USE

Robot population graph DO NOT USE

 

The automotive industry has an even greater robot density.

Although three of the top four countries for robot densities stagnated from 2010-2011, developing countries like China, Thailand and Brazil saw big gains in robotic density.

Here are the countries where robots are taking over auto production:

Robot population graph DO NOT USE

Robot population graph DO NOT USE

Expect this trend to continue as gadget-maker Foxconn plans a big push toward robots.

SEE ALSO: Check Out The Amazing Kiva Robots That Amazon Just Bought For $775 Million

Please follow Business Insider on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

0
Your rating: None