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Original author: 
Khaled Abdullah

If you are looking for an AK-47, a sniper rifle or even an anti-aircraft gun, it takes only half-an-hour of shopping around in this arms market, one of Yemen's biggest weapons markets, to find one.

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Today the winners of the prestigious 55th annual World Press Photo competition were announced in Amsterdam, and Samuel Aranda from Spain received the prize for World Press Photo of the Year 2011.

The winning photograph shows a woman caring for a wounded relative, inside a mosque used as a field hospital by demonstrators against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, during clashes in Sanaa, Yemen on October 15, 2011. Samuel Aranda was working in Yemen on assignment for The New York Times. He is represented by Corbis Images.

TIME photographer Yuri Kozyrev of Noor won first prize in the Spot News Singles category with his explosive picture of rebels leaping off a tank in Ras Lanuf, Libya.

A gallery of selected winners is above. You can see all the results here.

TIME salutes all of this year’s winners. Congratulations!

To see a multimedia about Jodi Bieber’s World Press Photo of the Year for TIME in 2011 click here.

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Change Square, the locus of anti-government protests in Yemen’s capital, Sana’a, has become a veritable tent city, home, for more than eight months, to several thousand protestors. And like any city, it caters to the needs of its citizen population: Doctors tend to the wounded at a makeshift hospital, volunteers prepare food, imams call the faithful to prayer, and a few entrepreneurs provide entertainment in the form of pellet-gun rifle ranges for revolutionaries frustrated with the peaceful part of their protest.

But unlike other cities, where the dead are forgotten in far away cemeteries, the martyrs of Change Square are at the center of attention. Photographs of those killed in the clashes flutter from the tent ropes that crisscross the city’s walkways. Portraits are plastered on the walls of the mosque.  Some protesters even wear bandanas printed with pictures of the dead wrapped around their forehead. And in the center of the square is a vast billboard where the protest’s grim toll is laid out in a mosaic of death intermingled with pride.  “We all want to be martyrs,” one young protestor told me. “To have change, we need to sacrifice, and sometimes that means our lives.” His friend agreed. “The only way we will get international attention for our cause is if there is blood on the streets.”

It’s a subtle condemnation of waning interest from the West as the Arab Spring moves into its ninth month. Thousands waving placards demanding the fall of the regime no longer garner the fevered media attention of Tunisia and Egypt. But death does. So in service to their dreams of liberation, some Yemeni revolutionaries aspire to the snipers bullet, or the machine gun spray. Not all of course. “I don’t want to be a martyr,” another protestor told me. “I want to see our dreams of a new Yemen come true.”

Yuri Kozyrev is a contract photographer for TIME who has covered the Arab Spring since January. To see his previous work from Libya, click here.

Aryn Baker,
TIME‘s Middle East Bureau Chief, is based in Beirut. Find her on Twitter at @arynebaker. You can also continue the discussion on TIME’s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIME.

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A riot of color in the night sky above the Arctic Circle gave local photographers a spectacular light show this September. Sometimes called the aurora borealis, the northern lights are caused by streams of particle-charged solar winds that hit the Earth’s magnetic field, causing hues of green and pink to shimmer against the backdrop of the stars. This year, professional and amateur photographers were able to capture the lights in more southerly latitudes than usual. Herewith, a small sampling of what they saw.

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Ahmad Gharabli / AFP - Getty Images

An anti-government protester jumps to throw stones towards a police station during clashes with regime loyalists in central Sanaa, Yemen on Feb. 17. At least 12 people were injured and police fired warning shots during the fierce clashes, an AFP reporter said.

Ahmad Gharabli / AFP - Getty Images

Regime loyalists throw stones towards anti-government protesters during clashes in central Sanaa on Feb. 17.

Khaled Abdullah / Reuters

A government backer hurls rocks at anti-government protesters during clashes in Sanaa on Feb. 17. Hundreds of Yemen government loyalists wielding batons and daggers chased off a small group of protesters trying to kick off a seventh day of rallies on Thursday to demand their president end his 32-year rule.

Ahmad Gharabli / AFP - Getty Images

An anti-government protester shouts slogans calling for the ouster of President Ali Abdullah Saleh as he holds stones in his hands during clashes with regime loyalists in central Sanaa on Feb. 17.

Ahmad Gharabli / AFP - Getty Images

Anti-government protesters throw stones towards regime loyalists during clashes in central Sanaa on Feb. 17.

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David R Arnott writes: Follow developments in Yemen here.

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