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Jeremy Edberg, the first paid employee at reddit, teaches us a lot about how to create a successful social site in a really good talk he gave at the RAMP conference. Watch it here at Scaling Reddit from 1 Million to 1 Billion–Pitfalls and Lessons.

Jeremy uses a virtue and sin approach. Examples of the mistakes made in scaling reddit are shared and it turns out they did a lot of good stuff too. Somewhat of a shocker is that Jeremy is now a Reliability Architect at Netflix, so we get a little Netflix perspective thrown in for free.

Some of the lessons that stood out most for me: 

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Original author: 
Jacob Kastrenakes

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In the background of flurries of punching, kicking, and special moves, fighting games have a long history of taking players on an exotic tour of the world. Reddit user RudeBootie has put together a collection of 125 retro fighting game backdrops depicting locations everywhere from training gyms, to the Serengeti, to hot springs — all as animated GIFs that recreate their bumpy 16-bit animations. The settings are pulled from nine different games, including three titles from the Street Fighter series. Though many of the locales have mystic or ancient vibes, the more modern-day settings are often filled with wonderful details hidden and animated in the background.

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Original author: 
Sam Byford

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It's hard to remember life before we were bombarded with notifications throughout the day on all manner of devices, for everything from Twitter replies to earthquake alerts in Japan. With very few exceptions, though, these all have one limiting factor in common: you're relying on someone else's software to interpret data and relay it to you. What if you could program your own notifications from objects or conditions in your physical environment, set to tell you anything you want to know, when you need to know it?

That’s the proposition offered by Supermechanical's Twine, a small turquoise box crammed with sensors. Launched on Kickstarter last year, it takes standard accelerometers, thermometers, and other sensors, and fits them into...

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