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This Q&A is part of a weekly series of posts highlighting common questions encountered by technophiles and answered by users at Stack Exchange, a free, community-powered network of 100+ Q&A sites.

Consistency vs. best practice: they are two competing interests any time a dev is working on legacy code. If LINQ hasn't been used previously, should it be used today? "To what extent are patterns part of code style," Robert Johnson asks, "and where should we draw the line between staying consistent and making improvements?"

Robert Johnson continues: "With the hypothetical LINQ example, perhaps this class doesn't contain it because my colleagues are unfamiliar with LINQ? If so, wouldn't my code be more maintainable for my fellow developers if I didn't use it?"

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This Q&A is part of a weekly series of posts highlighting common questions encountered by technophiles and answered by users at Stack Exchange, a free, community-powered network of 90+ Q&A sites.

lurkerbelow is the only developer at his company writing unit tests. Management, developers, everyone says they want to write unit tests, but nobody does. To bring developers into line, lurkerbelow has introduced pre-commit code review (Gerrit) and continuous integration (Jenkins). Not working. "How do I motivate my fellow coworkers to write unit tests?" he asks.

Practical deomonstrations help

jimmy_keen Answers (32 votes):

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An anonymous reader writes "Patrick Wyatt, one of the developers behind the original Warcraft and StarCraft games, as well as Diablo and Guild Wars, has a post about some of the bug hunting he's done throughout his career. He covers familiar topics — crunch time leading to stupid mistakes and finding bugs in compilers rather than game code — and shares a story about finding a way to diagnose hardware failure for players of Guild Wars. Quoting: '[Mike O'Brien] wrote a module ("OsStress") which would allocate a block of memory, perform calculations in that memory block, and then compare the results of the calculation to a table of known answers. He encoded this stress-test into the main game loop so that the computer would perform this verification step about 30-50 times per second. On a properly functioning computer this stress test should never fail, but surprisingly we discovered that on about 1% of the computers being used to play Guild Wars it did fail! One percent might not sound like a big deal, but when one million gamers play the game on any given day that means 10,000 would have at least one crash bug. Our programming team could spend weeks researching the bugs for just one day at that rate!'"

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Carat: Collaborative Energy Debugging

Google Tech Talk September 27, 2012 Presented by Adam Oliner. ABSTRACT We aim to detect and diagnose code misbehavior that wastes energy, which we call energy bugs. This talk describes a method for performing such diagnosis on mobile devices and an implementation, called Carat, for iOS and Android. Carat takes a collaborative, black-box approach. A non-invasive client app sends intermittent, coarse-grained measurements to a server, which identifies correlations between higher expected energy use and client properties like the running apps, device model, and operating system. Carat successfully detected all energy bugs in a controlled experiment and, during a deployment to a community of more than a quarter of a million users, detected (and sometimes diagnosed) thousands of instances of buggy apps running in the wild. About the speaker: Adam Oliner Adam is a postdoc in the EECS Department at UC Berkeley, working in the AMP Lab. Before coming to Berkeley, he earned PhD in computer science from Stanford University, where he was a DOE High Performance Computer Science Fellow and Honorary Stanford Graduate Fellow. Adam received a MEng in EECS from MIT, where he also earned undergraduate degrees in computer science and mathematics. His research focuses on understanding complex systems.
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This Q&A is part of a biweekly series of posts highlighting common questions encountered by technophiles and answered by users at Stack Exchange, a free, community-powered network of 80+ Q&A sites.

golergka O asks:

I'm working on a project solo and have to maintain my own code. Usually code review should be done by someone other than the author so the reviewer can look at the code with the fresh eyes. I don't have such luxury. What practices can I employ to more effectively review my own code?

Answer: Checklist & Refresh (7 Votes)

Aditya Sahay replies:

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