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The historic flooding throughout central Europe continues, as the Elbe River has broken through several dikes in northern Germany, and the crest of the swollen Danube River has reached southern Hungary, and threatens Serbia. Parts of Austria and the Czech Republic are now in recovery mode, as thousands of residents return home to recover what they can. Gathered here are images from the past several days of those affected by these continuing floods. See earlier entry: Flooding Across Central Europe. [24 photos]

A garden with a swimming pool is inundated by the waters of the Elbe River during floods near Magdeburg in the state of Saxony Anhalt, on June 10, 2013. Tens of thousands of Germans, Hungarians and Czechs were evacuated from their homes as soldiers raced to pile up sandbags to hold back rising waters in the region's worst floods in a decade. (Reuters/Thomas Peter)     

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Heavy rainfall over Europe during the the past week has swollen many rivers past their flood stage, wreaking havoc unseen in decades across Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Hungary, Slovakia, Poland and the Czech Republic. At least 18 people across the region have been killed, and tens of thousands have been evacuated. In Germany, the crest of the Elbe River is now approaching the North Sea, as the swollen Danube River is surging toward the Hungarian capital of Budapest. Collected here are images from the past several days of those affected by these historic floods, even as meteorologists predict more rain over the coming weekend. [36 photos]

The city hall of Grimma, Germany, surrounded by floodwater, on June 3, 2013. Flooding has spread across a large area of central Europe following heavy rainfall in recent days. Eastern and southern Germany are suffering under floods that in some cases are the worst in 400 years. Tens of thousands of Germans, Hungarians and Czechs were evacuated from their homes as soldiers raced to pile up sandbags to hold back rising waters in the region. (AP Photo/dpa, Jens Wolf)     

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Driverless cars may be coming sooner than expected.

With companies like Google and Audi already working on ways to make our vehicles more autonomous and safe, we're left wondering what the future will look like once every car has that ability.

Today we found a simulation via The Atlantic Cities that answers how a four-way intersection could work in an era of driverless cars.

...driverless cars will make intersections much more efficient. Right now, you may wind up sitting at a red light for 45 seconds even though no one is passing through the green light in the opposite direction.

But you don’t have to do that in a world where traffic flows according to computer communication instead of the systems that have been built with human behavior in mind.

The cars zoom and twist through the intersection, miraculously avoiding each other. While it seems quite scar,y there is much more to consider than red lights, green lights, and stop signs when computers are in control.

Now Watch: It Will Become A Lot Easier To Grow Produce In Your Apartment Thanks To These Futuristic Plant Pots

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TEDxTrieste 2/4/11 - Albrecht von Müller - The forgotten present

Prof. Dr. A. v. Muller is director of the Parmenides Center for the Study of Thinking. He teaches philosophy at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich (LMU) and theory of thinking at SISSA (the International School for Advanced Studies,Trieste) where he is also co-director of the international masters program MCA. His two main fields of interest are the phenomenon of thinking and the concept of time. After a PhD on "Time and Logic" at the University of Munich, he worked for many years in the Max Planck Society, taught in parallel at the University of Munich, and was subsequently director of EUCIS (European Center for International Security). He developed the visual reasoning methodology "Eidos" that supports complex thinking and decision making processes and he served as scientific advisor to several governments, supranational institutions and some large corporations. Von Müller is member of two multi-disciplinary research centers at the University of Munich, the Human Science Center and the Munich Center for Neuroscience, partner at the methods and consulting firm Parmenides Innovation, and member of the Board of Trustees of the Max Planck Institutes of Neurobiology and Biochemistry. He is co-editor of the Springer book series "On Thinking". In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep <b>...</b>
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The taps were flowing and the oom-pah bands were oom-pahing again in Germany. It’s Oktoberfest time, and the world’s largest festival celebrating beer reportedly attracted some 6 million visitors this time around before the taps ran dry earlier this week. The origin of the event dates back to 1810 when Crown Prince Ludwig was married to Princess Therese and the people of Munich were invited to attend the festivities. Only beer brewed within the city limits of Munich can be served at the festival. -- Lloyd Young (30 photos total)
Revelers attend the last and sunny day of Oktoberfest beer festival on Oct. 2 in Munich, Germany. (Johannes Simon/Getty Images)

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By Rebecca Horne

Between the pages of Mitch Epstein’s new book Berlin from Steidl is an elegant collection of photographs showing a city nearly devoid of people, under pale blue skies. Epstein directs his lens at architecture, art, infrastructure and other markers of history that Berliners have purposefully kept as reminders. A personal foreword by Epstein offsets the cool and precise images.

Epstein came from a Jewish American family that refused to visit Germany because of kin lost in the Holocaust. Breaking with family tradition, Epstein visited Germany. He found Berlin to be a source of fascination. He and his family moved to Germany for a six month residency at the American Academy in Berlin. Epstein writes: “I looked for the remnants of those tormented wartime and postwar histories; they were often overt, and sometimes lay just below the thin skin of contemporary Berlin. With an 8×10″ camera, I started at Sachsenhausen concentration camp in January and ended with the Dalai Lama speaking at Brandenburg Gate in June.”


Jewish Cemetery, Weissensee — the largest Jewish cemetery in Europe, established in 1880 for Berlin’s substantial Jewish population.


Teufelsberg (Devil’s Mountain). This artificial hill was built from World War II ruble on top of a Nazi technical college.


Checkpoint Charlie. This was an East-West crossing in divided Germany from 1961 to 1989. The original guardhouse and sign were moved to the Allied Museum and replaced with an on-site replica.


Lichtenberg. These Soviet inspired pre-fabricated Plattenbau (panel-building) housing complexes became prevalent in Berlin after WWII. The elephants were part of an itinerant circus.


Dalai Lama, Brandenburger Tor. The gate was commissioned by Friedrich Wilhelm II to represent peace and constructed in 1791. IN 1933, storm troopers held a torchlight procession through it to celebrate Hitler’s rise to power. Languishing in a no man’s land between two portions of the Berlin Wall during the Cold War, the Gate was the site of speeches by US presidents John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan.


Stasi Memorial Garden. The rosebushes were cultivated by former Stasi prisoners.

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In 1961, East Germany erected a wall -- initially barbed wire, eventually concrete -- in the middle of Berlin to prevent its citizens from fleeing the communist country to West Germany during the height of the Cold War. It has been reported that 136 people died while trying to escape, but the total number is unknown. The wall finally came down at the beginning of November in 1989, part of the reunification of East and West Germany. Here are images from this past weekend’s recognition of the construction of the wall 50 years ago, as well as historic images. -- Lloyd Young (30 photos total)
A nun walks in front of a line of wreaths during the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the construction of the Berlin Wall at the Berlin Wall Memorial at Bernauer Strasse in Berlin Aug. 13. Germany marks the 50th anniversary of the day communist East Germany sealed itself off behind the Wall. Germany had been divided into capitalist western and communist eastern sectors after the end of World War II. At the height of tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union, the East German regime started building the wall through the capital on Aug. 13, 1961. (Markus Schreiber/Associated Press)

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