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Street Fighter

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Technically, 2012 marked the 25th anniversary of Street Fighter, the classic Capcom fighting game franchise that's made a comeback over the past few years. This weekend, however, Capcom has made "I Am Street Fighter," a 72-minute documentary film, available to stream free on YouTube. Originally only available as part of the $149.99 Street Fighter 25th Anniversary Collection, the film traces Street Fighter all the way back to its roots, through the glory days of the arcade, and finally to today's tournament scene, where pro players can make a name for themselves internationally.

Listen to directors and players of the original Street Fighter talk about the series' humble origins, see life-long fans share their stories, their art, and their collections of Street Fighter games, hear former Capcom community manager Seth Killian explain the game's intricacies, and see famous professional players Justin Wong and Daigo Umehara explain the epic conclusion of one of the most infamous showdowns in fighting game history.

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Jon Brodkin writes "Pity poor Mega Man. The little blue robot boy with a gun for a hand was one of the most popular heroes in the Nintendo Entertainment System's heyday, starring in a video game series almost every bit as good as The Legend of Zelda and Super Mario Bros. The original Mega Man series resulted in some great games for the original NES and the Super Nintendo. But then he dropped (swiftly) from the face of the Earth. Attempts to bring Mega Man into the 3D world resulted in games not nearly as fun as their predecessors. Most recently, the planned Mega Man Legends 3 for Nintendo 3DS managed to generate a bit of fan excitement, but the project was canceled in July 2011. Gamers moved on — some grudgingly. Fans have clamored for Capcom to revive Mega Man for years, and it's happened to some extent. Mega Man 9 and 10 came out in 2008 and 2010, respectively, continuing the original series with the same graphical and gameplay style perfected in the 1980s. And Monday, something perhaps even more exciting occurred for Mega Man's 25th anniversary: the release of Street Fighter X Mega Man, a celebration of two excellent game series that have lost their luster in the HD age." Read on for the rest of Jon's review.

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When it comes to 2D fighting games, there are three big names -- Capcom, SNK, and Arc System Works. Capcom's Street Fighter is exacting and relatively precise, while its Marvel vs. Capcom series is controlled combo chaos. SNK's King of Fighters series is the anti-Street Fighter, stringing combos together with fetishistic precision, occasionally crippled by infinites and game-breaking combinations. Arc, meanwhile, has been going in its own direction with Guilty Gear and BlazBlue, two very ...

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Divekick

EVO is an event usually associated with world-class tournaments for games like Street Fighter and Marvel vs. Capcom. But this year some prominent head-to-head indie games are joining the fight as well. Leading the charge will be Mark Essen's famously addictive low-res fencing game, Nidhogg, and Noah Sasso's BaraBariBall, a fast-paced multiplayer e-sport, both of which made their debut at NYU's No Quarter exhibition.

There's also Chris Hecker's Spy Party, a competitive reverse-Turing test where keen observation and subtle movements win the day; Aztez, a turn-based strategy game; and Super Time Force, a time-warping run-and-gun from Sword & Sworcery developer Capy Games. And if nothing else, fighting fans would be remiss not to check out D...

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REVOK VS. GIANT video game by Lepos
More video game goodness from Lepos, this clip reveals Revok and Mike Giant in a Street Fighter II style bonus round, love this stuff.

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Capcom's Street Fighter maestro Yoshinori Ono has outlined his vision of fighting games on the next generation of consoles.

Future fighting games, he told Eurogamer, will let gamers customise their characters to a greater degree than we've seen in the past - indeed Street Fighter x Tekken's controversial gem system is a sign of things to come.

"For future titles I want to keep having this concept of, my character is different than your character," he said.

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Keeper of the faith.

It's just a sideshow attraction in Guardian Heroes, but Arcade Mode embodies all of the inimitable, brash creativity that has made its maker, Treasure, one of the best-loved game studios. Imagine, having selected your character in Street Fighter IV, that you were made to fight not one but every character in the game, all of whom piled on you simultaneously in an endless survival gauntlet, without so much as a stutter in frame-rate.

It's mayhem. And not the kind of conservative, Saturday morning children's TV mayhem of so many Smash Bros. titles. It's bona fide wild-men-picking-fights-with-rocks mayhem, the sort that, in the blur of colour and shape, makes it difficult to know where your character ends and an enemy begins. But it's also the kind of mayhem that, in some deep place in your being, unlocks the abandoned joy we all play video games in the hope of rediscovering.

Guardian Heroes is the eldest of Treasure's three seminal releases for Sega's Saturn (the others being Silhouette Mirage and Radiant Silvergun, which was also recently re-released on Xbox Live Arcade). It mixes the side-scrolling fantasy beat-'em-up play style of Golden Axe with the combat complexity of Street Fighter II and threads them into an OutRun-style branching structure. As a result, the Story Mode is at once familiar and, in the unique combination of these iconic designs, fresh and enthralling.


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"It's easier said than done."

Street Fighter producer Yoshinori Ono has explained why Street Fighter and Mortal Kombat are unlikely bedfellows.

"I actually get a lot of requests for Street Fighter vs. Mortal Kombat on my Twitter feed and elsewhere," Ono told the US PlayStation blog.

"I understand why people want it, but it's easier said than done. Having Chun Li getting her spine ripped out, or Ryu's head bouncing off the floor... it doesn't necessarily match."


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