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 Illustrations by Simon Stalenhag<br />
Futuristic, detailed, simplistic and haunting. That&#8217;s how we&#8217;d describe the robot and dinosaur packed images from Stockholm painter Simon Stalenhag. When not painting, Simon also makes films, commercials and book covers. In his spare time, he even conceptualizes video games as part of the company, Pixeltruss, which recently released the action platformer Ripple Dot Zero.<br />
Simon is an all around creator. See more of his mesmerizing work here.

Take Our Breath Away: Illustrations by Simon Stalenhag

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Going through Jen’s portfolio is a bit of an emotional roller coaster. One minute you’re laughing at a naked man’s naughty bits as he sits astride a horse while being laughed at by another horse, and the next you’re looking at a series of photographs of heroin addicts in the park.

The jolty feeling that Jen gives you is actually incredibly refreshing – here’s a photographer who’s willing to go into undesirable situations to meet the people who dwell in them and not remain a bystander; Jen gets them involved. In her Wig Outs series Jen shoots marginalised women before and after they get dressed for the day, the common similarity they all share being some kind of wig. In Llama Love, Jen visits an elderly health centre where every few months some llamas come to visit to cheer everyone up, and the photos of this are just so, so beautiful.

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    Jen Osborne: Bounce

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    Jen Osborne: Singles

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    Jen Osborne: Singles

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    Jen Osborne: Singles

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    Jen Osborne: Singles

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    Jen Osborne: Llama Love

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    Jen Osborne: Bounce

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Jonathan Glazer‘s heady sci-fi film Under the Skin finally hit festivals in the past month, and made quite an impression thanks to the fact that Scarlett Johansson plays an alien with a less than healthy interest in human men.

Some of the films unusual tone comes from the fact that Glazer shot on real streets without telling people they were being filmed; some of the men Johansson interacts with didn’t know they were in the movie until afterward. Maybe you got a sense of the film’s strange character in the first teaser that hit not long ago, but you can get a better look now.

Check out the full trailer below.

Expect to see Under the Skin in early 2014.

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TIME Photo Department

Yolanda Cuomo is the curatorial voice behind some of the 20th century’s greatest photographic books. This year, alongside Melissa Harris, Cuomo is co-curating the LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph in Charlottesville, Va., June 13 – 15, 2013.

One word comes up again and again, like a shared mantra, when talking with Yolanda Cuomo, or when discussing Cuomo with people who know her: collaboration. Hardly surprising, perhaps, in light of the talent that, at one time or another, the 55-year-old art director and designer has worked with — including creative icons from Avedon and Sylvia Plachy to Twyla Tharp and Laurie Anderson. But one quickly gets the sense that, in Cuomo’s world, collaboration is not simply one way to approach a project; it’s the only way to approach a project.

As her longtime friend (“creative soulmate” might be a more apt description), Aperture Foundation editor-in-chief Melissa Harris, puts it: “Yolanda is simply one of the greatest people I know. She is so full of ideas, and our collaborations [on books, magazines, exhibitions] have been so fantastic because we always approach each project from an utterly fresh perspective. And we laugh,” she adds, making it clear that humor is an integral element of their long-time, enormously fruitful partnership. “We laugh a lot.”

The driving force behind the celebrated Yolanda Cuomo Studio, Yo (as all her friends and colleagues call her) has helped envision and produce some of the most striking and influential art and photography books of the past two decades, including Diane Arbus’ Revelations, Gilles Peress’ Farewell to Bosnia, Pre-Pop Warhol and scores of other titles.
(Incredibly, it was only within the last year, with New York at Night, that Cuomo got what she calls her “first spine.” She’d done 85 books through the years, she told LightBox, “but Norma Stevens and I published New York at Night in 2012 and, holy shit, there was my name on the spine!”).

A graduate of Cooper Union, Cuomo got her start in the publishing world as a junior designer at Condé Nast in the early 1980s. Under the mentorship of the legendary art director Marvin Israel, she not only was introduced to many of the people who would become part of her vast and cherished professional extended family — Plachy, Avedon, Peress, Nan Goldin and others — but also got her very first lessons, from a master, in the power of collaboration.

Yolanda Cuomo at her desk in her Chelsea studio, New York NY, February 4, 2012.

Pete Pin

Yolanda Cuomo at her desk in her new Chelsea studio in February.

“Marvin was so brilliant,” Cuomo says, “and one of the key things I learned from him — by his example, not by his making a big deal out of it — was that bringing other peoples’ voices and sensibilities to a project can make it so much stronger and more wonderful than if only one person holds sway over everything.”

The reason Cuomo got the job at Condé Nast in the first place, meanwhile, is emblematic of another type of creativity altogether.

“I lied,” she says, her mischievous laugh all these years later suggesting that she still can’t believe it herself. “When I was interviewed [for the Condé job] I told them that of course I knew how to do mechanicals. Then I went right out and immediately called a friend and was like, ‘What’s a mechanical?’”

Regardless of how she got her foot in the door, Cuomo learned the ins and outs of the art and publishing worlds from the very best. A quick study, she was eventually asked to oversee a new project by the Village Voice, and in 1985 Yolanda Cuomo was named art director of the Voice’s short-lived, tremendously creative fashion magazine, Vue. There, she and her small staff were afforded the sort of creative freedom that, for anyone working in magazines today, must seem something from another, near-mythical age.

Courtesy of the Village Voice/Yolanda Cuomo Design

Courtesy of the Village Voice/Yolanda Cuomo Design

Cover and spreads from the September 1986 issue of Vue. Photographs by Amy Arbus.

“It was total carte blanche,” Cuomo recalls. “We had to fill 32 pages that came out once a month. We sat in a room and just said to each other, ‘Okay, let’s call up people we love.’”

The names of those people they loved comprise something of a Who’s Who of talent of the era — each one of whom brought a unique sensibility to the pages of Vue. For one shoot, Sylvia Plachy photographed models posing in the trees of a New York cemetery. For another, Nan Goldin commissioned a pregnant bodybuilder friend to model lingerie in the East Village’s Russian baths. Phrases like “creative foment” seem to have been coined to describe exactly the sort of atmosphere that existed when Yolanda Cuomo was learning her chops.

The Voice shut down Vue after just a half-dozen issues, but its young staff, thrilled by what they’d accomplished together, was not ready to quit working as a team. With her assistant and two others, Cuomo found a small office space in Manhattan, and her design studio was born.

The studio’s first photo book was Unguided Tour, a collection of work by Sylvia Plachy.

“When we work together,” Plachy says of her collaborations with Cuomo, “we both have an intuitive sense about editing and designing. Yo is open to new things; she responds to things in the moment. She doesn’t force her point of view. Instead, it’s a free-flowing enjoyment of the evolution of the ideas, and moving toward something new and exciting.”

For Cuomo, inspiration can come from anywhere, from any time and from anyone. An old French book about the Eiffel Tower, for instance, discovered in a bookstore in Paris decades earlier, might influence the design of a photography book today. Closer to home, while making Paolo Pellegrin’s 2012 artist book — designed in a single, breakneck week — Cuomo found a visual muse in her assistant designer’s workspace.

“Bonnie [Briant] had a little color copy of a dog photo that she loved taped to her notebook on her desk, and I saw it and thought, ‘That is so beautiful.’”

A scan of the notebook — Scotch tape and scratches included — became the cover of the Pellegrin book. “That’s the way I like to work,” Cuomo says. “Spontaneously inventing.”

The fact that Cuomo has a full life outside of her work — a life that helps inform everything she does — speaks volumes about her ability to find balance in both the spontaneous and the thoroughly predictable. Living in Weehawken, New Jersey, Cuomo rides her bike every day from her home to the ferry, which she takes across the Hudson River to the West Side of Manhattan and her studio. At day’s end, she heads back across the river, to her “big old Victorian house,” her garden, her family — in other words, to a world that adds meaning and color to her vocation as an art director, designer and teacher.

In the end, that might be the greatest collaboration of them all: the way Yolanda Cuomo weaves family and work, leisure and labor, vision and vocation into a fully realized world of her own making.

Alissa Ambrose & Ben Cosgrove

See more of Cuomo’s work at Yolanda Cuomo Design.

Alissa Ambrose is a freelance writer and photo editor based in New York. Ben Cosgrove is the editor of LIFE.com.

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Original author: 
Liv Siddall

Main

It’s the work that everyone’s talking about, Richard Mosse’s infrared film shot in the heart of Congo that was shown this year at the Venice Biennale in the Irish pavilion. In this short documentary produce by frieze, Richard explains the ideas behind the film and the history behind the method itself. It turns out that infrared film, which picks up chlorophyl from only the healthiest living plants, was produced in the 1940s by the military to help them see enemies hiding out in the bushes.

Read more

Advertise here via BSA

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By DAVID GONZALEZ

In tiny, rented rooms, Mexican women who work as waitresses amid lonely men tend to their families and their culture. Ruth Prieto Arenas followed them from their jobs to their homes.

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Original author: 
Sean Hollister

Isteve_large

If you want to watch a film about Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, you'll have plenty of options before long: You could track down the aging Pirates of Silicon Valley, or wait for the Aaron Sorkin film based on Walter Issacson's authorized biography. You could hope that Ashton Kutcher's jOBS gets a release date. Or, you could watch Funny or Die's iSteve, an 80-minute parody starring Justin Long, who once portrayed the Mac in Apple's famous Mac vs. PC commercials. Jorge Garcia (Lost, Once Upon A Time) plays his partner Steve Wozniak. It's free to stream right now at our source link below.

Continue reading…

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Interview with Japanese Photographer Daisuke Yokota

“I wonder whether it isn’t possible to create a way for photographs to carry time within them.” 

The works of Japanese photographer Daisuke Yokota have a poetic, yet spooky and mysterious quality. He re-shoots his back and white prints, adding successive layers of handmade distortion. Read the entire interview at American Photo Mag.

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