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Terrorism in the United States

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Americans remembered the horror of September 11, 2001, and the nearly 3,000 people who died in the hijacked plane attacks on New York, Washington and Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Read the full story here and for related coverage click here.

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In the 10 years since the attacks of 9/11, much has changed in the world. Led by the United States, western nations invaded and occupied Afghanistan and later Iraq, removing their rulers and unleashing sectarian violence and insurgencies. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers and civilians have lost their lives at a cost of trillions of dollars, and western military forces remain in both countries. A third war, the War on Terror, has driven changes in the U.S. that have pushed against the limits of what American society will accept in return for security -- measures such as pre-emptive military strikes, indefinite detentions, waterboarding, wiretapping, and invasive airport security systems. As we remember those lost on September 11, 2001, and construction of the new skyscrapers in Manhattan nears completion, most U.S, troops are scheduled to leave Iraq by the end of this year and Afghanistan by 2014. Here is a look at some of the events of the post-9/11 decade, and some of the progress still being made. This entry is part three of a three-part series on the 10th Anniversary of the 9/11 Attacks -- (see also Part 1: The Week Before and Part 2: The Day of the Attacks). [46 photos]

A test of the Tribute in Light rises above lower Manhattan, on September 6, 2011, in New York City. The memorial, sponsored by the Municipal Art Society, will light the sky on the evening of September 11, 2011, in honor of those who died ten years ago in the terror attacks on the United States. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

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TIME presents a one-day exclusive presentation of the documentary TIME: VOICES OF 9/11. The film chronicles the stories of men and women whose lives changed forever on Sept. 11, 2001. These free screenings, which will be featured at Film Forum, commemorate the 10th anniversary of the devastating attacks.

For people at work on the top floors of the World Trade Center’s South Tower, it began as another beautiful September morning—until a plane struck the neighboring tower, and another plane struck their own. “I can see the U on the tail, and this plane is looking at me, eye level, eye contact. I can hear this revving sound as the plane got closer, I can hear this revving engine,” says Stanley Praimnath, one of only four survivors from above the 78th floor, as he recalls watching United Airlines flight 175 crash into his office. All four survivors recount their terrifying journey down Stairway A to safety, while on the ground, fire chief Joseph Pfeifer was sending firefighters up. Howard Lutnick, CEO of Cantor Fitzgerald, who’d taken the morning off to accompany his son to his first day of kindergarten, describes his rush to the scene—only to learn that none of his coworkers were able to escape, including his brother.

With the day’s end came a decade of challenges—the anthrax attacks, the rise of Islamophobia, the War on Terror and wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. From Tom Brokaw to Rudy Giuliani to Valerie Plame, the makers of ten years of tumultuous history remember what happened and why, and reflect on what it has meant for our nation and for the world. These leaders, first responders, widows and warriors are the voices of 9/11—they have shown us in ways large and small the unbounded resilience of the human spirit.

TIME: VOICES OF 9/11 will be screened at Film Forum, located at 209 West Houston Street, New York, NY 10014. For more information go to their website by clicking here.

Show Times (0ne day only): Sunday, September 11 •  1:00, 2:50, 4:40, 6:30, 8:10, 9:45

FREE ADMISSION

Tickets available at the box office on the day of show  on a first-come, first-served basis.

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Ten years ago, 19 men trained by al-Qaeda carried out a coordinated terrorist attack on the United States that had been planned for years. The attackers simultaneously hijacked four large passenger aircraft with the intention of crashing them into major landmarks in the United States, inflicting as much death and destruction as possible. Three of the planes struck their targets; the fourth crashed into a field in Pennsylvania. In a single day, these deliberate acts of mass murder killed nearly 3,000 human beings from 57 countries. More than 400 of the dead were first responders, including New York City firefighters, police officers, and EMTs. It was one of the most-covered media events of all time, and after a decade, the images are still difficult to view. These attacks and the global reaction to them have profoundly shaped the world we live in, so it remains important to see the images and remember just what happened on that dark day. This entry is part two of a three-part series on the 10th Anniversary of the 9/11 Attacks -- (see also Part 1: The Week Before and Part 3: The Decade Since). [50 photos]

The Statue of Liberty, seen from a vantage point in Jersey City, New Jersey, as the lower Manhattan skyline is shrouded in smoke following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York. Photo taken on September 15, 2001. (AP Photo/Dan Loh)

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On September 11, 2001, photography editors across the world, overcome with a deluge of devastating imagery, faced the daunting task of selecting photos that would go on to define a catastrophe like no other. A decade later, TIME asked a wide variety of the industry’s leading photo editors, photographers, authors, educators, and bloggers to tell us which image moved them most—and why.

Some couldn’t choose one single image. Vin Alabiso, head of photography at the Associated Press on September 11, 2001, said, “Of the thousands of images that were captured, I thought only a handful would truly resonate with me. I was wrong. As a document of a day filled with horror and heroism, the collective work of so many professionals and amateurs leaves its own indelible mark on our memory.”

Holly Hughes, editor of Photo District News, said she was moved most by the photographs of the missing people that blanketed the city in the days after 9/11. “The images that can still move me to tears are the snapshots of happy, smiling people looking out from the homemade missing posters that were taped to signposts and doorways and mailboxes,” she said. “How those posters were made, the state of mind of the people who stood at Xerox machines to make copies, it’s too painful to contemplate. Those flyers stayed up around the city for weeks, through wind and rain, and became entwined with the sorrow and anxiety we carried with us day after day.”

Alabiso added, “A decade later, I could only wish that the most memorable photo of September 11, 2001, would not have been memorable at all…simply two towers silhouetted against a clear azure-blue sky.”

To visit TIME’s Beyond 9/11: A Portrait of Resilience, a project that chronicles 9/11 and its aftermath, click here.

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The attacks of September 11th, 2001 came as a huge surprise, shocking the world and immediately dominating the news around the world. Ten years later, the reverberations from that shock and the varying reactions to it continue to affect nearly everyone in ways large and small. While most people remember where they were on that day, it can be difficult to recall what else was happening in the days just before. I thought it would be interesting to go through the newswires and find photos of events taking place around the world during the week of September 3 to September 10, 2001. Some of the photos are directly related to the upcoming attacks, or the fallout that resulted, many have nothing at all to do with the attacks, but simply show glimpses of what was happening at that time. Gathered here is a time capsule of images taken during this week of September, one decade ago, before everything changed. This entry is part one of a three-part series on the 10th Anniversary of the 9/11 Attacks -- (see also Part 2: The Day of the Attacks and Part 3: The Decade Since). [41 photos]

A view of the New York City skyline with the World Trade Center at sunset taken from the US Open at the UATA National Tennis Center in Flushing, New York, on September 5, 2001. (Jamie Squire/Allsport/Getty Images)

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