Skip navigation
Help

Toor

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
Amar Toor

Fabrege_fractal_large

Tom Beddard is a UK-based artist with a fractal fascination. Among his most fascinating works is a set called Fabergé Fractals — a collection of mesmerizing 3D structures created from computer modeling software. As Architizer reports, Beddard created his models using iterative formulas, with the output of one iteration serving as the input for the next. The result is a collection of fractal structures that are equal parts organic and geometric in their intricacy.

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None

Amazonlogostock_large

Ever noticed anything a little different about the drop-down menus on Amazon's website? Ben Kamens has, and he's published an illuminating explanation on his website. According to Kamens, lead developer at Khan Academy, the distinguishing factor is Amazon's speed — moving your cursor along the site's main drop-down brings up submenus almost instantly. That kind of responsiveness is rather unique in web design, and, as Kamens explains, it's something Amazon achieved thanks to a subtle, yet clever algorithm.

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None

maze 640

Japanese Twitter user @Kya7y recently discovered a breathtaking gem from her father's past — a hand-drawn, incredibly intricate maze that he created more than 30 years ago. According to Spoon & Tamago, the father spent a full seven years drawing the maze by hand, sketching in each detail on a single sheet of A1-sized paper, measuring 33 inches long and 23 inches wide. It's not clear whether he based his design on anything in particular, but @Kya7y says she's already received plenty of requests for photocopies.

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None

Stephen Hawking FLICKR

Tuesday marked Stephen Hawking's 71st birthday, an occasion that anthropologist Hélène Mialet commemorated with a fantastic essay about the legendary physicist's place in history and popular culture. At the core of Mialet's essay is the question of whether history will remember Hawking as man, or the machine to which he has been inextricably linked — and what that says about contemporary society.

"What I discovered was that to understand Hawking, you had to understand the people and the machines without whom he would be unable to act and think," she writes. "You had to understand the ways in which these entities augmented and amplified Hawking’s competencies."

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None