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What if you could compile all of YouTube's worst-rated videos in one place? Considering the sheer volume of user content that's uploaded to the site every second, it's a daunting challenge. Nonetheless, that's the idea Boootube is trying to execute on; it's a running collection of the most down-voted clips on YouTube. In other words, it's the best of the worst; these are videos that have received hundreds and often times thousands of unfavorable votes from viewers around the world.

Selections include Lil Wayne trying his hand at guitar, controversial baby yoga demonstrations, and an expletive-laced rant targeted at an innocent Dunkin Donuts staffer. Unflattering political ads and blatantly racist rants are also a common theme. There's also a 15-minute video where the clip's host uses Photoshop to prove that the "original" Eminem died only to be quietly replaced by a lookalike. We're all familiar with the overnight sensations and stars that have been catapulted to glory thanks to YouTube. But BooTube serves as a sober reminder that the good is often outweighed by the bad or mediocre.

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The workspace of the future is in Elon Musk’s lab. Using a variety of virtual reality and gesture-sensing tools, Musk has set up a system that allows himself and his engineers to design and manipulate models of rocket parts using just their hands. He's compared it to the Iron Man laboratory, and in many ways, it looks like just that.

But you won't need the technological expertise of Tony Stark in order to make one: Musk employs a Leap Motion Controller, an Oculus Rift, and a projector — among other common tools — in order to make the setup work. Not all of those are necessarily being used at once though. Musk says that he began with the Leap Motion, and then expanded to more advanced setups, such as one that involved projecting 3D mockups onto a translucent pane of glass.

While Musk admits that it's partially just "a fun way to interact with a complex model," he thinks that this new setup could mean far more than that. "I believe we're on the verge of a major breakthrough in design and manufacturing." Musk demonstrates how using the Leap he can fully move and rotate the model by just swiping, opening, and closing his hands.

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Seinquest2000 is a 13 minute multimedia presentation which seeks to answer some of the pressing questions raised by the Seinfeld2000 Twitter account. If, like many, you've spent the past 15 years missing Jary, Garge, Elane, and Kragdar, SeinQuest2000 is the best thing you'll see all day.

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For most, a life on Bitcoin is a short experiment. For some of Pensacola, Florida's homeless, though, the currency has become a lifeline, making up the gap that low-paying or intermittent jobs and public assistance can't fill. Wired profiles the men and women who have developed an alternative virtual economy, raising charity money through Bitcoin and making small amounts of money through Mechanical Turk-like jobs that pay in Bitcoin rather than requiring a bank account. Though Bitcoin still isn't widely accepted, services like Gyft can turn the currency into gift cards for food or other necessities, and mobile phones and computers are affordable even for some people who can't make a monthly rent payment. Jesse Angle, who earns money by completing simple online tasks for Bitcoin, says the system is less risky and embarrassing than panhandling. He and his friends, he says, are "kind of the homeless geeks."

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When Urban Compass debuted to the public in May of this year, it had its fair share of doubters. The company was trying to reinvent the process of searching for an apartment in New York, a notoriously expensive, difficult, and fraud-filled endeavor. Four months later the company is approaching profitability, raising another $20 million in venture capital, and plotting its expansion into new cities like San Francisco, Boston, and Chicago

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Original author: 
Jacob Kastrenakes

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One of the biggest personal data collectors around is getting ready to open its vaults to the public. According to Forbes, you'll soon be able to request your personal files from Acxiom, a marketing company that holds a database on the interests and details of over 700 million people. That database reportedly holds information on consumers' occupations, phone numbers, religions, shopping habits, and health issues, to name a few. That data has traditionally been given only to marketers — for a fee, of course — but Acxiom has decided to let consumers peer into its database as well. Whether individuals will have to pay too is still up for debate, but it's been decided that a person can only view their own file.

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Original author: 
Sam Byford

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Jeff Widener, the photojournalist behind one of the most recognizable (and meme-worthy) images in modern media, has spoken out about how he came to create "Tank Man" during the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989.

Low on film and dazed after being hit in the face with a brick, Widener obtained a roll of 100 ASA film from a tourist and used a Nikon F2 with an 800mm lens; the film's slow speed accounts for the photo's slight blurriness, though, as Widener notes, it was "good enough to front almost every newspaper in the world the next day."

For more on Widener's career beyond "Tank Man" as well as some stunning examples of his photojournalism across Asia, read the full interview at Petapixel.

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Original author: 
Aaron Souppouris

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Opened in 1995, Yurikamome was one of the first fully-automated railways to open in Japan. Running from Shimbashi to Toyusu, the line travels past some of Tokyo's famous landmarks, including the giant Daikanransha Ferris Wheel. Vimeo / YouTube user darwinfish105 has created a hyperlapse — like a timelapse, but taken from a non-stationary viewpoint — video aboard a Yurikamone train, and the result is pretty spectacular. The filmmaker mirrored and flipped the video, creating a kaleidoscopic effect that adds to the sense of speed, but there's also a less-edited version available on YouTube, if you'd rather take in more of the sights.

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Original author: 
Carl Franzen

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It's tough to be a parent of an adolescent these days. Just as parents have caught on to the fact that some of their precious youngsters may be using Snapchat to send each other sexts, it turns out the teens have already moved on to another potentially scary online service, called...Ask.fm? That's at least the picture painted by a new report from CNET, which profiles Ask.fm, a Formspring-like question-and-answer site, and its 57 million unique users, half of whom are under the age of 18. The content users post reveals many typical teen-oriented topics, from inside jokes and gossip to puerile questions about sex. But like many other semi-anonymous places online, Ask.fm also features more troubling material, including posts on self-harm,...

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