Skip navigation
Help

Vulnerability

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

schwit1 writes "Stomping on the brakes of a 3,500-pound Ford Escape that refuses to stop–or even slow down–produces a unique feeling of anxiety. In this case it also produces a deep groaning sound, like an angry water buffalo bellowing somewhere under the SUV's chassis. The more I pound the pedal, the louder the groan gets–along with the delighted cackling of the two hackers sitting behind me in the backseat. Luckily, all of this is happening at less than 5mph. So the Escape merely plows into a stand of 6-foot-high weeds growing in the abandoned parking lot of a South Bend, Ind. strip mall that Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek have chosen as the testing grounds for the day's experiments, a few of which are shown in the video below. (When Miller discovered the brake-disabling trick, he wasn't so lucky: The soccer-mom mobile barreled through his garage, crushing his lawn mower and inflicting $150 worth of damage to the rear wall.) The duo plans to release their findings and the attack software they developed at the hacker conference Defcon in Las Vegas next month–the better, they say, to help other researchers find and fix the auto industry's security problems before malicious hackers get under the hoods of unsuspecting drivers."

0
Your rating: None

punk2176 writes "Hacker and security researcher Alejandro Caceres (developer of the PunkSPIDER project) and 3D UI developer Teal Rogers unveiled a new free and open source tool at DEF CON 21 that could change the way that users view the web and its vulnerabilities. The project is a visualization system that combines the principles of offensive security, 3D data visualization, and 'big data' to allow users to understand the complex interconnections between websites. Using a highly distributed HBase back-end and a Hadoop-based vulnerability scanner and web crawler the project is meant to improve the average user's understanding of the unseen and potentially vulnerable underbelly of web applications that they own or use. The makers are calling this new method of visualization web 3.0. A free demo can be found here, where users can play with and navigate an early version of the tool via a web interface. More details can be found here and interested users can opt-in to the mailing list and eventually the closed beta here."

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
Joshua Kopstein

Dsc_3747_large

The US government is waging electronic warfare on a vast scale — so large that it's causing a seismic shift in the unregulated grey markets where hackers and criminals buy and sell security exploits, Reuters reports.

Former White House cybersecurity advisors Howard Schmidt and Richard Clarke say this move to "offensive" cybersecurity has left US companies and average citizens vulnerable, because it relies on the government collecting and exploiting critical vulnerabilities that have not been revealed to software vendors or the public.

"If the US government knows of a vulnerability that can be exploited, under normal circumstances, its first obligation is to tell US users," Clarke told Reuters. "There is supposed to be some mechanism...

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
Aaron Souppouris

Padlocks-555_large

There's a huge industry out there that no one really talks about: the market for your security. As The Economist reports, exploits for Internet Explorer, Chrome, iOS, Windows 8, and other software are discovered either by hackers or security firms, and sold to the highest bidder. A single Internet Explorer exploit can sell for as much as $500,000, as security researchers that would once detail software vulnerabilities for kudos have realized they were treating "diamonds like pebbles." It's mostly been governments buying exploits, but in recent years, agencies have realized they're funding a black market for extremely dangerous R&D, and are beginning to move their search for security flaws in-house.

Continue reading…

0
Your rating: None

An image displayed on a computer after it was successfully commandeered by Pinkie Pie during the first Pwnium competition in March.

Dan Goodin

A hacker who goes by "Pinkie Pie" has once again subverted the security of Google's Chrome browser, a feat that fetched him a $60,000 prize and resulted in a security update to fix underlying vulnerabilities.

Ars readers may recall Pinkie Pie from earlier this year, when he pierced Chrome's vaunted security defenses at the first installment of Pwnium, a Google-sponsored contest that offered $1 million in prizes to people who successfully hacked the browser. At the time a little-known reverse engineer of just 19 years, Pinkie Pie stitched together at least six different bug exploits to bypass an elaborate defense perimeter designed by an army of some of the best software engineers in the world.

At the second installment of Pwnium, which wrapped up on Tuesday at the Hack in the Box 2012 security conference in Kuala Lumpur, Pinkie Pie did it again. This time, his attack exploited two vulnerabilities. The first, against Scalable Vector Graphics functions in Chrome's WebKit browser engine, allowed him to compromise the renderer process, according to a synopsis provided by Google software engineer Chris Evans.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

0
Your rating: None

wiredmikey writes "On Wednesday, a remote code execution vulnerability in PHP was accidentally exposed to the Web, prompting fears that it may be used to target vulnerable websites on a massive scale. The bug itself was traced back to 2004, and came to light during a recent CTF competition. 'When PHP is used in a CGI-based setup (such as Apache's mod_cgid), the php-cgi receives a processed query string parameter as command line arguments which allows command-line switches, such as -s, -d or -c to be passed to the php-cgi binary, which can be exploited to disclose source code and obtain arbitrary code execution,' a CERT explains. PHP developers pushed a fix for the flaw, resulting in the release of PHP 5.3.12 and 5.4.2, but as it turns out it didn't actually remove the vulnerability."


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None



Oracle has declined to patch a critical vulnerability in its flagship database product, leaving customers vulnerable to attacks that siphon confidential information from corporate servers and execute malware on backend systems, a security researcher said.

Virtually all versions of the Oracle Database Server released in the past 13 years contain a bug that allows hackers to perform man-in-the-middle attacks that monitor all data passing between the server and end users who are connected to it. That's what Joxean Koret, a security researcher based in Spain, told Ars. The "Oracle TNS Poison" vulnerability, as he has dubbed it, resides in the Transparent Network Substrate Listener, which routes connections between clients and the database server. Koret said Oracle learned of the bug in 2008 and indicated in a recent e-mail that it had no plans to fix current supported versions of the enterprise product because of concerns it could cause "regressions" in the code base.

Read the rest of this article...

Read the comments on this post

0
Your rating: None