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Hindus worldwide recently celebrated Diwali, a five-day "festival of lights" that marks the new year and honors the principle of good over evil. One Diwali ritual is honoring Lakshmi, the Hindu goddess of wealth and prosperity. The occasion is also celebrated with fireworks, the sharing of sweets and gifts, and by decorating homes with lights and candles. Diwali is an official holiday in India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Mauritius, Guyana, Trinidad & Tobago, Suriname, Malaysia, Singapore, and Fiji.-- Lloyd Young EDITOR'S NOTE: Due to the Thanksgiving holiday, there will be no post on Friday.)( 42 photos total)
A reveler lights a bottle rocket at a park during Diwali, the “festival of lights”, in Kolkata on Nov. 13. The festival marks the victory of good over evil and commemorates the time when Hindu God Lord Rama achieved victory over Ravana and returned to his kingdom Ayodhya after 14 years in exile. (Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

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Tomorrow, March 22, is World Water Day, an event established by the United Nations in 1993 to highlight the challenges associated with this precious resource. Each year has a theme, and this year's is "Water and Food Security." The UN estimates that more than one in six people worldwide lack access to 20-50 liters (5-13 gallons) of safe freshwater a day to ensure their basic needs for drinking, cooking, and cleaning. And as the world's population grows beyond 7 billion, clean water is growing scarcer in densely populated areas as well as in remote villages. Collected here are recent images showing water in our lives -- how we use it, abuse it, and depend on it. [36 photos]

A journalist takes a sample of polluted red water from the Jianhe River in Luoyang, Henan province, China, on December 13, 2011. According to local media, the sources of the pollution were two illegal chemical plants discharging their production wastewater into the rain sewer pipes. (Reuters/China Daily)

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THREATENING TO JUMP
THREATENING TO JUMP: A woman identified as an engineer in her 30s working for the Workers’ Housing Organization, one of the public bodies to be closed in austerity cuts, sat on a window ledge of the office building and threatened to jump in Athens Wednesday. (Angelos Tzortzinis/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

SEA OF PEPPERS
SEA OF PEPPERS: A worker sorted chilies near Ahmedabad, India, Wednesday. (Ajit Solanki/Associated Press)

DIFFERENT VIEW
DIFFERENT VIEW: A child looked out as Ultraorthodox Jewish people gathered for a traditional wedding in Bnei Brak, Israel, Tuesday. (Oded Balilty/Associated Press)

BRINGING HER DAUGHTER TO WORK
BRINGING HER DAUGHTER TO WORK: Licia Ronzulli, Italy’s member of the European Parliament, voted Wednesday during a session in Strasbourg, France, with her daughter in her lap. (Vincent Kessler/Reuters)

A MOTHER REMEMBERS
A MOTHER REMEMBERS: The mother of a soldier killed in Afghanistan attended a memorial service at the Island of Tears memorial complex in Minsk, Belarus, Wednesday. The ceremony was held to mark the 23rd anniversary of the Soviet pullout from Afghanistan. (Tatyana Zenkovich/European Pressphoto Agency)

HARD HEAD
HARD HEAD: A police officer broke marble slabs with his head during a martial arts demonstration in Seoul Wednesday. Police are preparing to secure the Nuclear Security Summit, which will be held in Seoul in March. (Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters)

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Coal occupies a central position in modern human endeavors. Last year over 7000 megatons were mined worldwide. Powerful, yet dirty and dangerous, use of coal is expanding every year, with 2010 witnessing a production increase of 6.8%. Around 70 countries have recoverable reserves, which some estimates claim will last for over a hundred years at current production levels. Mining for coal is one of the world's most dangerous jobs. While deadliest in China, where thousands of miners die annually, the profession is still hazardous in the West and other regions as well. Our mining and use of coal accounts for a variety of environmental hazards, including the production of more CO2 than any other source. Other concerns include acid rain, groundwater contamination, respiratory issues, and the waste products which contain heavy metals. But our lives as lived today rely heavily on the combustible sedimentary rock. Over 40% of the world's electricity is generated by burning coal, more than from any other source. Chances are that a significant percentage of the electricity you're using to read this blog was generated by burning coal. Gathered here are images of coal extraction, transportation, and the impact on environment and society. The first eight photographs are by Getty photographer Daniel Berehulak, who documented the lives of miners in Jaintia Hills, India. -- Lane Turner (48 photos total)
22-year-old Shyam Rai from Nepal makes his way through tunnels inside of a coal mine 300 ft beneath the surface on April 13, 2011 near the village of Latyrke, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. In the Jaintia hills, located in India's far northeast state of Meghalaya, miners descend to great depths on slippery, rickety wooden ladders. Children and adults squeeze into rat hole like tunnels in thousands of privately owned and unregulated mines, extracting coal with their hands or primitive tools and no safety equipment. (Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

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