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Norwegian photographer Espen Rasmussen spent six years photographing refugees in eight countries (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Colombia, Georgia, Norway, Syria and Yemen). In 2004 Rasmussen discovered a common theme in the stories of refugees he found himself covering in places as disparate as Chad and Serbia, and decided to follow in the footsteps of displaced people the world over. Rasmussen writes about this remarkable opening image:

“I took the Janjaweed picture during a trip to Chad in 2004. I stayed in the border areas with Sudan for two weeks, documenting the lives of tens of thousands of refugees fleeing the violence in the Darfur province in Sudan. Many of them lived in huge camps, others were forced to live in dry rivers, so that they could water their livestock. I crossed the border into Darfur together with a local town leader, and after a drive of some hours, we saw a group of armed men riding towards us in the desert. We stopped and talked with them, presenting me as a reporter. After following the Janjaweed group for a few hours, I returned to Chad with a set of images. The next day we got news that the group had crossed the border into Chad and attacked a local village, burning down the houses. The Janjaweed militia is responsible for massive violence in Darfur, and is accused of being armed by the Sudanese government.”

You can see the impressive results of Rasmussen’s years covering refugees in his brand new book Transit, or on Transit’s interactive online pages. Photographs courtesy Espen Rasmussen/Panos Pictures.


“They are called the Janjaweed militia “Devils on horseback”. They arrived on horseback through the desert, 30 strong and heavily armed. These are the men who have forced hundreds of thousands to flee and who are responsible for killing and rape in Darfur province, western Sudan. Their leader is decorated with knives, bullet belts, automatic weapons and a spear. The populace are the victims in a conflict involving rebels, the Sudanese army and militant nomads. The Arabian Janjaweed soldiers are accused of the genocide of the non-Arabian part of the population, with help from the authorities.”


“A mother buries her second child in the space of a week. Family and friends have gathered around the tiny coffin in the Soacha slum in Colombia to pay their respects. A year earlier her husband was killed, so the family had to flee from the town of Putumayo. The woman believes that the paramilitary group who killed her husband also killed the children, to prevent them from returning to their home. Her five year old boy was kidnapped and beaten to death, while his eight year old sister was strangled in her bed. Everyday life for the between 3.3 – 4.9 million internally displaced in Colombia is dangerous. Paramilitary groups, the guerrillas and the army fight for territory and cocaine production. Families are forced to flee every day, often to the slums around the capital city.”


Adem (25), Yemen:
“Every day I have to tie my three children to the wall with rope. There is nobody here to look after them. I am afraid they will injure themselves if not, or crawl out of the window. The twins are three years old, my daughter is only two. They are alone from when I go to work around six o’clock in the morning until I come home again around midday. I work as a housemaid, but the money I earn is not enough for both rent and food. I earn around 50 dollars a month, when there is work. My rent is 46 dollars a month. Sometimes I get food from the families I clean for. It pains me to tie up my children. I think about them every single day. How will they grow up? Will they go to school? Will they survive? Like any mother, I dream that they will get an education, go to a university and become engineers or doctors. I just want them to go to school, to have friends and to play like other children.”


“During the escalating violence in Iraq in 2007, the owner of one of the most popular restaurants in Baghdad had to close it down and flee. In Syria, in Damascus, he re-opened in the Iraqi neighborhood Jaramana, and has found the same popularity among his customers – just in a different country. All people working in the restaurant are Iraqi refugees.”

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BAGHDAD — In downtown Baghdad, a police headquarters has been painted two shades of purple: lilac and grape. The central bank, a staid building in many countries, is coated in bright red candy cane stripes. Multicolored fluorescent lights cover one of the city’s bridges, creating a Hawaiian luau effect. Blast walls and security checkpoints stick out because they are often painted in hot pink.

Baghdad has weathered invasion, occupation, sectarian warfare and suicide bombers. But now it faces a new scourge: tastelessness.

Iraqi artists and architecture critics who shudder at each new pastel building blame a range of factors for Baghdad’s slide into tackiness: including corruption and government ineptitude, as well as everyday Iraqis who are trying to banish their grim past and are unaccustomed to having the freedom to choose any color they want.

“It’s happening because Iraqis want to get rid of the recent past,” said Caecilia Pieri, the author of “Baghdad Arts Deco: Architectural Brickwork 1920-1950.” “They see the colors as a way of expressing something new, but they don’t know which colors to use. The Arab mentality is that you have to be the owner of your building, and you do what you want with it. But there are no government regulations like in Paris or Rome. It’s anarchy of taste.”

For decades, Saddam Hussein’s government ruled over aesthetics in Iraq’s capital with the same grip it exercised over its people. A committee of artists, architects and designers approved the color of buildings as well as the placement of shrubs. With many beige brick buildings, and color used sparingly — most often on mosques — the city’s appearance was uniform and restrained.

But the committee, like Mr. Hussein’s government, fell apart after the United States invasion in 2003. Some years later, when Iraqis started rebuilding as the violence declined, there was no central arbiter. Bright colors started appearing, and places like the Trade Ministry were done up in pink, orange and yellow.

 Shades of Change in Baghdad

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A block, half restored, is painted with bright colors and designs as part of the city's effort to rebuild Baghdad. Iraqi artists and architecture critics blame the city's tackiness to the everyday Iraqis who are trying to banish their grim past and are unaccustomed to having the freedom to choose any color they want. (Ayman Oghanna/The New York Times) #

 Shades of Change in Baghdad

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The Central Bank of Iraq is refurbished in a red and white pattern as part of the city's effort to rebuild Baghdad. (Ayman Oghanna/The New York Times) #

 Shades of Change in Baghdad

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Blast walls outside the Trade Ministry are painted with bright colors and designs as part of the city's effort to rebuild. (Ayman Oghanna/The New York Times) #

 Shades of Change in Baghdad

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Hussein Ali al-Khafaji, left, and Ra'ad Saadi stand outside Khafaji's art gallery in Baghdad, March 12, 2011. Iraqi artists and architecture critics blame the city's tackiness to the everyday Iraqis who are trying to banish their grim past and are unaccustomed to having the freedom to choose any color they want. (Ayman Oghanna/The New York Times) #

 Shades of Change in Baghdad

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The new National Bank of Iraq headquarters is painted with bright colors and designs as part of the city's effort to rebuild Baghdad.(Ayman Oghanna/The New York Times) #

 Shades of Change in Baghdad

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The Samaraii Hospital is painted with bright colors and designs. Baghdad has weathered invasion, occupation, sectarian warfare and suicide bombers. But now it faces a new scourge: tastelessness. (Ayman Oghanna/The New York Times) #

 Shades of Change in Baghdad

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Plastic flowers line a checkpoint in Baghdad. (Ayman Oghanna/The New York Times) #

 Shades of Change in Baghdad

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A police headquarters in Baghdad's Karrada district is painted in two shades of purple as part of the city's effort to rebuild Baghdad. ŇItŠs happening because Iraqis want to get rid of the recent past,Ó said Caecilia Pieri, the author of ŇBaghdad Arts Deco: Architectural Brickwork 1920-1950. ŇThey see the colors as a way of expressing something new, but they donŠt know which colors to use. The Arab mentality is that you have to be the owner of your building, and you do what you want with it. But there are no government regulations like in Paris or Rome. ItŠs anarchy of taste.Ó (Ayman Oghanna/The New York Times) #

 Shades of Change in Baghdad

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A sports injury and physiotherapy center is painted with bright colors and designs as part of the city's effort to rebuild. For decades, Saddam HusseinŠs government ruled over aesthetics in IraqŠs capital with the same grip it exercised over its people. A committee of artists, architects and designers approved the color of buildings as well as the placement of shrubs. With many beige brick buildings, and color used sparingly Ń most often on mosques Ń the cityŠs appearance was uniform and restrained. (Ayman Oghanna/The New York Times) #

 Shades of Change in Baghdad

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The Trade Ministry is painted in pink and orange as part of the city's effort to rebuild Baghdad. Iraqi artists and architecture critics blame the city's tackiness to the everyday Iraqis who are trying to banish their grim past and are unaccustomed to having the freedom to choose any color they want. (Ayman Oghanna/The New York Times) #

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Brittany Ryder, 11, looks on as family members clear out their house during a mandatory evacuation on May 15, 2011 in Melville, Louisiana. The Morganza Spillway floodgates were opened for the first time in nearly forty years yesterday to lower the crest of the flooding Mississippi River. St. Landry Parish officials ordered a mandatory evacuation today for around 2000 residents in Krotz Springs and Melville, Louisiana.

Space shuttle Endeavour lifts off from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on May 16, 2011 for its final and what will be the penultimate flight for the US shuttle program. “We want to thank all the tens of thousands of employees who have put their hands on this incredible ship,” shuttle commander Mark Kelly said moments before liftoff at 8:56.

A Palestinian demonstrator stands on a burnt-out car during clashes with Israeli troops, not seen, following a demonstration to mark the 63rd anniversary of “Nakba”, Arabic for “Catastrophe”, the term used to mark the events leading to Israel’s founding in 1948, in the east Jerusalem neighborhood of Issawiyeh.

 May 20, 2011

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Landon Bonaventure, 5, walks to the edge of floodwater from the Mississippi River, that flooded a dozen homes and businesses, seen in background, in St. Francisville, La., Thursday, May 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) #

 May 20, 2011

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Women make decorations in front of a sign made of posters for newly elected Haitian President Michel Martelly on his inauguration day on May 14, 2011 in the Canape Vert neighborhood of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. In April, Martelly won the run-off election against candidate Mirlande Manigat. (Photo by Allison Shelley/Getty Images) #

 May 20, 2011

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Two Palestinian men stand on a road barricade armed with stones as fires burn around them during clashes with the Israeli police May 15, 2011 at Qalandiya checkpoint near Ramallah, West Bank. Today marks the 'Nakba' or 'catastrophe' which befell Palestinians following Israel's establishment in 1948. (Photo by Uriel Sinai/Getty Images) #

 May 20, 2011

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Brittany Ryder, 11, looks on as family members clear out their house during a mandatory evacuation on May 15, 2011 in Melville, Louisiana. The Morganza Spillway floodgates were opened for the first time in nearly forty years yesterday to lower the crest of the flooding Mississippi River. St. Landry Parish officials ordered a mandatory evacuation today for around 2000 residents in Krotz Springs and Melville, Louisiana. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) #

 May 20, 2011

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The space shuttle Endeavour lifts off from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Monday, May 16, 2011. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara) #

 May 20, 2011

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Members of the United States Naval Academy freshman class link arms and lay back into the Severn River as part of the "Wet and Sandy" challenge during the rigorous Sea Trials May 17, 2011 in Annapolis, MD. Under strict safety supervision, about 900 freshmen, or "Plebes," faced 14 hours of 32 rigorous physical and mental challenges during the trials, a daylong, action-oriented event modeled after the Marine Corps 54-hour Crucible and the Navy's Battle Stations. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) #

 May 20, 2011

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David Brodeur Jr, 4, bids a final farewell to his father, Maj. David Brodeur, following a graveside service at the Air Force Academy on May 17, 2011 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The 34-year-old U.S. fighter pilot was serving as a NATO trainer when he and 8 other Americans were shot and killed by an Afghan air force cadet April 27 at the Kabul International Airport. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) #

 May 20, 2011

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Farmers work as floodwaters from the Mississippi river creep across their fields in Natchez, Miss., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. The Coast Guard said it closed the Mississippi River at the port in Natchez, Miss., on Tuesday because barge traffic could increase pressure on the levees. Heavy flooding from Mississippi tributaries has displaced more than 4,000 in the state, about half of them upstream from Natchez in the Vicksburg area. (AP Photo/Dave Martin) #

 May 20, 2011

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Tanya Acosta moves sandbags with a toy wagon as she constructs a sandbag berm around her home May 17, 2011 in Stepensville, Louisiana. The Morganza Spillway floodgates were opened for the first time in nearly forty years and have succussfully lowered the crest of the flooding Mississippi River into the Atchafalaya Basin. Heavy rains have left the ground saturated, rivers swollen, and have caused widespread flooding in Louisiana. Mississippi, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Arkansas. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) #

 May 20, 2011

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This citizen journalism photo taken with a cell phone by Stefanie Gordon aboard a passenger flight from New York to Palm Beach, Fla. shows the space shuttle Endeavor as it streaks toward orbit shortly after liftoff Monday May 16, 2011. Gordon says she had just awakened from a nap on the flight when the pilot announced the shuttle might come into view. (AP Photo/Stefanie Gordon) #

 May 20, 2011

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Maria Shriver appears with Oprah Winfrey during a star-studded double-taping of "Surprise Oprah! A Farewell Spectacular," Tuesday, May 17, 2011, in Chicago. "The Oprah Winfrey Show" is ending its run May 25, after 25 years, and millions of her fans around the globe are waiting to see how she will close out a show that spawned a media empire. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast) #

 May 20, 2011

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Paramilitary policemen patrol at the Tiananmen Square outside the Forbidden City, which was the Chinese imperial palace from the mid-Ming Dynasty to the end of the Qing Dynasty, on May 18, 2011 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Feng Li/Getty Images) #

 May 20, 2011

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Floodwaters from the Yazoo river creep across fields of crops near Yazoo City, Miss., Thursday, May 19, 2011. The water is expected to crest on Thursday. For thousands of people forced from their homes by the rising Mississippi River, life has become a tedious waiting game: waiting for meals at shelters, waiting for the latest word on their flooded homes, waiting for the river to fall. (AP Photo/Dave Martin) #

 May 20, 2011

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Flooded railroad tracks run near the Mississippi River on May 19, 2011 in Vicksburg, Mississippi. The river finally crested today at 57 feet in Vicksburg, the highest level in recorded history. Heavy rains have left the ground saturated, rivers swollen, and have caused widespread flooding in Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee and Arkansas. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) #

 May 20, 2011

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A masked Palestinian demonstrator uses a sling-shot to hurl stones at Israeli troops, not pictured, during the weekly demonstration against Israel's separation barrier in the West Bank village of Bilin, near Ramallah, Friday, May 20, 2011. President Barack Obama on Thursday finally uttered the words the Palestinians had been waiting to hear for two years: that the basis for border talks with Israel is the pre-1967 war line.(AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed) #

 May 20, 2011

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A girl walks on a sunflower field during the Agro Brasilia, an agricultural exhibition on the outskirts of Brasilia, Brazil, Thursday, May 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres) #

 May 20, 2011

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Iraqi security forces inspect the scene of a bombing in Kirkuk, 180 miles, or 290 kilometers, north of Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, May 19, 2011. Twin bombs that appeared timed to lure policemen out of their fortified headquarters killed and wounded dozens of policemen. (AP Photo/Emad Matti) #

 May 20, 2011

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Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, centre, Irish President Mary Mc Aleese, right, and Christy Cooney, President of the Gaelic Athletic Association look out at the pitch at the home of the GAA, Croke Park Stadium, in Dublin, Wednesday May 18, 2011, site of a notorious massacre where British troops killed 14 Irish civilians in 1920. The Queen's visit to Croke Park on the second day of her historic trip to the Republic of Ireland highlights the vast improvement in Anglo-Irish relations since those dark days. It brought the English monarch to a large sports stadium that is a revered spot for Irish nationalists who mourn those who died there during the conflict with Britain.(AP Photo/pool) #

 May 20, 2011

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A Kashmiri boy jumps into the Nigeen Lake on a hot summer day in Srinagar, India, Wednesday, May 18, 2011. (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan) #

 May 20, 2011

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Kelly Slater of the U.S. competes in round one of the Billabong Rio Pro men's surfing competition at the Arpoador Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday May 17, 2011. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana) #

 May 20, 2011

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A Pakistani child, with his face covered with flies, sits inside a wooden cart in an alley of a slum on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Tuesday, May 17, 2011. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen) #

 May 20, 2011

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President Barack Obama greets graduates, some overcome with emotion, before he delivers the commencement address at the Booker T. Washington High School graduation at Cook Convention Center in Memphis, Tenn., Monday, May 16, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) #

 May 20, 2011

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Pakistanis gather in a field playing cricket and other games as the sun sets in Islamabad, Pakistan, Monday, May 16, 2011. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen) #

 May 20, 2011

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US space shuttle Endeavour lifts off from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on May 16, 2011 for its final and what will be the penultimate flight for the US shuttle program. "We want to thank all the tens of thousands of employees who have put their hands on this incredible ship," shuttle commander Mark Kelly said moments before liftoff at 8:56 (1256 GMT). AFP PHOTO/Nicholas KAMM #

 May 20, 2011

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A Palestinian demonstrator stands on a burnt-out car during clashes with Israeli troops, not seen, following a demonstration to mark the 63rd anniversary of "Nakba", Arabic for "Catastrophe", the term used to mark the events leading to Israel's founding in 1948, in the east Jerusalem neighborhood of Issawiyeh, Sunday, May 15 ,2011.(AP Photo/Oded Balilty) #

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HIGH WATER
HIGH WATER: Floodwater filled farmland near Yazoo City, Miss., Thursday. A man died in Vicksburg after being pulled from the floodwater overflowing from the Mississippi River, becoming what is believed to be the first flood casualty since the river started spilling into Mississippi and Louisiana. (Dave Martin/Associated Press)

POLICY OUTLINE
POLICY OUTLINE: From left, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen, National Security Adviser Tom Donlion, Sen. John Kerry (D., Mass.), UN Ambassador Susan Rice and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton listened to President Barack Obama deliver a speech on Middle East policy at the State Department Thursday in Washington. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

GLOBAL AUDIENCE
GLOBAL AUDIENCE: The Berkat family watch a live TV broadcast of Mr. Obama’s speech at their home in Islamabad, Pakistan, Thursday. President Barack Obama called for Israelis and Palestinians to seek a two-state solution based on the 1967 borders. (Nathalie Bardou/Associated Pres)

TRIPLE BOMBING
TRIPLE BOMBING: Iraqi security forces inspected the scene of a triple bombing outside a police station in Kirkuk, some 180 miles north of Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, which killed 27 people and wounded scores. (Emad Matti/Associated Press)

RIGHT ANGLES
RIGHT ANGLES: Laborers worked at the construction site for a commercial complex in the eastern Indian city of Bhubaneswar Thursday. (Reuters)

OLD GLORY
OLD GLORY: Children peeped through a torn U.S flag hanging from their makeshift shelter in a slum on the outskirts of Karachi, Pakistan, Thursday. (Athar Hussain/Reuters)

GETTING TRAINING
GETTING TRAINING: Afghanistan National Army soldiers underwent training from a U.S. contractor at Camp Leatherneck on the outskirts of Lashkar Gah in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, Thursday. (Massoud Hossaini/AFP/Getty Images)

BABY GOT BAAA
BABY GOT BAAA: Sheep lined up to be judged in the ring at the Devon County Show Thursday in Exeter, England. One of the region’s biggest county shows, it is often seen as a curtain raiser for the whole showing season and a barometer for the health of the whole agricultural industry in general. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

NOT LIKE THE OTHERS
NOT LIKE THE OTHERS: A police officer showed a M-26 hand grenade found in a box of tomatoes, during a presentation to the press at the police station in Medellin, Colombia, Thursday. The Colombian Police seized thirty M-26 hand grenades hidden in three boxes of tomatoes that allegedly belonged to criminal gangs. (Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images)

TUSSLE
TUSSLE: Nepalese police clashed with Rastriya Prajatantra Party-Nepal supporters during a protest outside Nepal’s Constituent Assembly building in Kathmandu Thursday. The demonstrators demanded the dissolution of the Constituent Assembly a week ahead of the end of its term. (Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images)

INAUGURATION TIME
INAUGURATION TIME: People bought T-shirts bearing the portrait of President Alassane Ouattara in Yamoussoukro, Ivory Coast, Thursday. Mr. Ouattara will be inaugurated on Saturday before a number of international leaders. (Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images)

TAKING A DIP
TAKING A DIP: A boy cooled off on a hot summer day in the waters of Dal Lake in Srinagar in Indian-controlled Kashmir Thursday. Many parts of northern India are facing severe hot weather conditions with temperatures hitting 111 degrees Fahrenheit in many places, the media reported. (Fayaz Kabli/Reuters)

PASSING THROUGH
PASSING THROUGH: A farmer led her cows on a rice paddy field in Boi Khe village outside Hanoi, Vietnam, Thursday. (Kham/Reuters)

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Clothes make the commander.

There's this famous scene in the movie Patton. No, not the one where he stands in front of the American flag and talks about shooting the Hun in the belly. I'm talking about the scene where two tanks get stuck in mud during the Third Army's march across France, and General Patton hops out of his Jeep to direct traffic. The image switches to a close shot of Patton, and he's beaming. He revels in his conception of a great commander: one who's willing to put his own boots in the muck.

In Anomaly: Warzone Earth, you play a traffic cop in the Patton mould. When an alien invasion sets down in Baghdad, you're the commander on the ground, scampering around the battlefield in an exhausting effort to will your convoy of tanks and missile launchers into victory. Your character never fires a weapon; in fact, you're the tiniest thing on the screen – a mere mortal dancing through massive weaponry. Yet at the end of a battle, the smoking earth seems to bear your outsized thumbprint. Now I see what Patton enjoyed so much.

Anomaly is a reversal of the standard tower defence format: the evil, faceless aliens place towers along a path, and your troops attempt to survive their gauntlet. The switcheroo could be considered a gimmick if the developers at 11 bit studios weren't so clever about it. They haven't simply swapped roles; they've re-engineered the form.


Read more...









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Editor’s note: This post has been updated most recently on 1 May 2011. All the link additions can be found at the bottom of the post.

The world lost Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros in Libya yesterday, two not only great photojournalists, but based on tributes I have read,  two wonderful human beings. Both men were in their very early forties. Two other photographers, Guy Martin and Michael Christopher Brown were also injured by the blast that killed Hetherington and Hondros. Wednesday 20 April 2011 will remain as one of the darkest days in the history of photojournalism, along with 10 February 1971, the day when Larry Burrows, Henry Huet, Kent Potter, and Keisaburo Shimamoto were downed in Laos. I had never met either Tim Hetherington or Chris Hondros, but I had huge amount of respect and admiration for their work, not only the courage and willingness to put themselves in harm’s way  for their stories but especially for the compelling photographs they produced under the difficult and dangerous circumstances forever present in conflict situations. As soon as the terrible news were announced  during yesterday afternoon and evening,  countless tributes and memorials began flooding online on both sides of the Atlantic from both men’s friends and colleagues. I would like to show my own appreciation towards Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros by compiling here some of those mentioned tributes, as well links to some interviews and work of both the photojournalists. I would like to dedicate this post  to the memory of the two men and to their friends and family. My thoughts are with them at this very sad time. I can only imagine the pain felt by those who knew Tim and Chris personally.  I hope friends and family can find some solace in the fact that neither of them lived their lives in vain. Not only did both Hetherington and Hondros spend most of  their careers highlighting important issues  that would have otherwise been ignored or overlooked by the general public in countries such the UK and US, but they also practiced their craft at the very top tier of our industry to a very high standard and they were setting a mark towards which the rest of us should always strive for. Tim and Chris will be greatly missed.

Tim Hetherington 1970-2011

“My pictures were being used to illustrate others’ ideas, so I started making stories to express my own ideas about the world”  - Tim Hetherington

“My work is about trying to get us to understand that we are connected and trying to build bridges and understanding between people.”  - Tim Hetherington on Twitter August 27, 2010

Please take a moment to write a message to Tim Hetherington’s family and share it with his friends http://timhetherington.org/condolences/

Chris Hondros 1970-2011

Chris Hondros Guest Book

Funeral Services Announced For Chris Hondros

The initial news…

Articles – New York Times: ‘Restrepo’ Director and a Photographer Are Killed in Libya (NYT: April 2011)

Articles – BBC: Two photojournalists killed in Libyan city of Misrata (BBC: April 2011)

Articles – PDN: Tim Hetherington Killed In Libya (PDN: April 2011)

Articles – PDN: Chris Hondros Killed in Libya (PDN: April 2011)

“He was driven to make the most compelling images in some of the world’s most chaotic places. He strove to make a difference, to make people feel what he was seeing.” Los Angeles Times staff photographer Rick Loomis on Chris Hondros

Articles – LA Times: Photojournalists Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros killed in Libya (LAT Framework: April 2011)

Articles – BJP: Two photojournalists killed, others severely injured in Libya (BJP: April 2011)

Articles – MSNBC: Two photojournalists are killed and two others injured in rocket attack in Misrata (MSNBC: April 2011)

Articles – CPJ: Photojournalists Hetherington, Hondros dead in Libya (CPJ: April 2011)

Articles – Guardian: Documentary maker Tim Hetherington and photographer Chris Hondros killed (Guardian: April 2011)

Tributes and memorials…

Articles – NPPA: Tim Hetherington, Chris Hondros Killed In Libya (NPPA: April 2011)

Articles – Guardian: Tim Hetherington obituary (Guardian: April 2011)

“He knew what path he wanted to follow, his work was direct and purposeful and stood as an example to many of his proteges.”

Articles – Panos Pictures: Tim Hetherington 1970 – 2011 (Panos: April 2011)

Articles – BBC: Tim Hetherington: 1970 – 2011 (BBC: April 2011)

Blogs – CJ Chivers: Almost Dawn in Libya: Chris & Tim, Heading Home. (Writer’s blog: April 2011)

Articles – TIME: Tim Hetherington in Memoriam (TIME LB: April 2011)

Articles – TIME: Chris Hondros in Memoriam (TIME LB: April 2011)

Articles – NYT Lens: Parting Glance: Chris Hondros (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Articles – NYT Lens: Parting Glance: Tim Hetherington (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Articles – Wall Street Journal: Remembering Chris Hondros (WSJ: April 2011)

Articles – New Yorker Photo Booth: In Memoriam: Tim Hetherington (New Yorker: April 2011)

Articles – Sue Turton (Al Jazeera): Remembering Tim Hetherington (Al Jazeera: April 2011)

Blogs – FotoBoogie: Tim Hetherington gone but never forgotten 

Blogs – Fred Ritchin: Tim Hetherington, a casualty of war 

Blogs – Michael Grieve: The integrity of Tim Hetherington

Blogs – David Alan Harvey: only the good die young..

Blogs – Kenneth Jarecke: For What’s It’s Worth

Blogs – Vincent Laforet: 2 Great photographers lost today in Libya – doing what they loved to do. (Photographer’s blog: April 2011)

Blogs – Andrew Hetherington: Dear Tim (WTJ: April 2011)

Blogs – Pete Kiehart: Chris and Tim

Articles – Dana Stevens (Slate): Tim Hetherington’s Diary (Slate: April 2011)

Articles – Peter Bradshaw: Tim Hetherington: a brilliant journalist and a courageous, radical film-maker (Guardian: April 2011)

Articles – Xan Brooks: Tim Hetherington: one of the finest photojournalists on the planet (Guardian: April 2011)

Articles - Sebastian Junger:  Tim Hetherington (Vanity Fair: April 2011)

NYT Mag DoP Kathy Ryan’s tribute to Tim…

Articles – Kathy Ryan: Remembering Tim Hetherington (6thfloor blog NYT: April 2011)

“Tim died in pursuit of a story for us” – David Campbell

Articles – David Campbell: Post-photography: Tim Hetherington’s living legacy (DC blog: April 2011)

“Without Chris, Tim, and other photojournalists like them, the truth about the horrors of war can easily be hidden. Dismissed. Accepted.” – Andrea Bruce

Articles – Andrea Bruce: Chris Hondros : A Photojournalist Remembered (NPR: April 2011)

Articles – Craydon Carter (Vanity Fair): A Loss in the Family: Tim Hetherington 1970-2011 (VF: April 2011)

Articles – Sebastian Doggart: Tim Hetherington: A hero’s journey (Telegraph: April 2011)

Articles – Channel4 (UK): Tim Hetherington : a Tribute (Channel4: April 2011)

Articles – Life: Chris Hondros in Memoriam (Life.com: April 2011)

Articles – Getty Images blog: Chris Hondros, friend and colleague (Getty blog: April 2011)

Articles – Life: Remembering Tim Hetherington (Life.com: April 2011)

Articles – Doctors Without Borders: In Memoriam: Chris Hondros (Doctors without Borders: April 2011)

InterviewsSebastian Junger on Tim Hetherington (ABC News: April 2011)

Articles – ABC News: A Filmmaker Tim Hetherington’s Last Message (ABC News: April 2011)

““The news that Chris Hondros was killed in Misurata is a gut punch to so many people, for so many reasons, both because he was so young, so talented, and perhaps most of all because he was so fearless. It is impossible to imagine him doing anything but the work he loved doing. The world is a more enlightened and more aware place today because Chris Hondros felt such a profound responsibility to brave war zones in order to share the truth in poignant images with the rest of the world.” – John Kerry

“Everything about him — his passion, his sense of purpose, and his spirit — gave meaning to the word `photojournalist.” – John Kerry

Articles – Boston Globe: John Kerry recalls photographer Chris Hondros killed in Libya (Boston Globe: April 2011)

We should never forget how dangerous it is to cover conflicts…

Articles – Roger Tooth: ‘Photographers have to be near the action. Sometimes too near’ (Guardian: April 2011) Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros were killed while shooting the war in Libya. The Guardian head of photography explains the unique challenge of war photojournalism

Articles – NPR: The Toll of Covering Conflicts (NPR: April 2011)

Articles – Sean Smith: War photographers are not addicted to danger (Guardian: April 2011)

Articles – Boston Globe Big Picture: Photographers in Peril (Boston Globe: April 2011)

Articles – NPR: War Photographers Joao Silva and Greg Marinovich on their injuries,ethics (NPR: April 2011)

Articles – Scott Strazzante: On life and loss, death and photojournalism (Chicago Tribune: April 2011)

Articles - Daily Beast: Libya War Photographers’ Final Hours (DB: April 2011)

Some debate going on regarding if the news were appropriate to be broken on social media first…

Articles – Teru Kuwayama: Notifying Next of Kin in the Age of Facebook (PBS: April 2011)

Articles – Wired Rawfile blog: Journalists Killed in Libya, News Breaks on Facebook (Raw File: April 2011)

Some interviews with Tim and Chris…

InterviewsTim Hetherington’s Last Interview (Outsideonline.com: 2011)

InterviewsTim Hetherington : The fault lines of West Africa (Frontline Club: 2009)

InterviewsTim Hetherington (PBS video from 2009 on on A Photo Editor blog)

Essential reading…

InterviewsTim Hetherington : By Any Means Necessary (Foto8: 2008)

InterviewsTim Hetherington and Gary Knight discuss war photography (Dispatches)

InterviewsChris Hondros (Chicago Tribune Assignment Chicago blog: 2011)

InterviewsChris Hondros : Me and Joseph Duo (Digital Journalist: 2005)

InterviewsChris Hondros : Life Behind the Lens (MSNBC)

Some Tim Hetherington interviews from the PJ Links archive…

Hetherington, Tim (BBC: October 2010)

Hetherington, Tim (Guernica: September 2010)

Hetherington, Tim talks about his documentary Restrepo (NPR: June 2010)

“If you are interested in mass communication, then you have to stop thinking of yourself as a photographer. We live in a post-photographic world. If you are interested in photography, then you are interested in something — in terms of mass communication — that is past. I am interested in reaching as many people as possible.” – Tim Hetherington

Hetherington, Tim (NYT Lens: June 2010)

Hetherington Tim (video) (VF: December 2007) Pushing back the Taliban and al-Qaeda in Afghanistan’s strategically crucial Korengal Valley is one of the U.S. Army’s deadliest challenges. For “Into the Valley of Death” (January 2008), Sebastian Junger dug in with the men of Second Platoon, whose humor, courage, and camaraderie come under daily fire. In this video, which features battlefront footage shot by Junger and photographer Tim Hetherington for ABC News, Junger and Hetherington talk about their experiences in Afghanistan while working on the story.

Hetherington, Tim on his Liberia project (BBC: 2009)

Hetherington, Tim at NYPH (video c. 45 minutes) (What’s the Jackanory: May 2009)

Their work…

The photojournalism community is in shock today, but we can take some comfort in knowing that both men died doing what they most loved. We can celebrate and applaud their lives’ work and achievements.

Tim’s website

Chris’ website

Features and Essays – NYT: Chris Hondros, at Work in Libya (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Features and Essays - MSNBC: Photojournalist Chris Hondros  tribute slideshow (MSNBC: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Guardian: Chris Hondros – a retrospective in pictures (Guardian: April 2011)

Features and Essays – BBC: Chris Hondros in Libya: The last photographs (BBC: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Chris Hondros: Baghdad in D Minor (NYT Lens: 2010)

Some Chris Hondros features from the PJ Links archive…

101st Airborne in Afghanistan (Newsnet5.com: October 2010)

Firefight in Afghanistan (Montreal Gazette: July 2010) Hondros NYT Lens

Afghanistan, seen through a Humvee window (MSNBC: June 2010)

My window onto Kandahar (Tampabay.com: June 2010) M-ATV vehicle in Kandahar, Afghanistan

Features and Essays – Guardians: Tim Hetherington – a retrospective in pictures (Guardian: April 2011)

Features and EssaysTim Hetherington’s photographs (MSNBC: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Vanity Fair: Tim Hetherington: A Vanity Fair Portfolio (VF: April 2011)

Videos – Tim Hetherington: Diary (Photographer’s Vimeo: 2010)

Videos – Tim Hetherington: Sleeping Soldiers (Photographer’s Vimeo: 2009)

Videos - Tim Hetherington: Healing Sport (The Photography Channel)

Some Tim Hetherington features from the PJ Links archive…

Infidel (NYT Lens: October 2010) A Family Album: American Soldiers at War

Restrepo (Visura: August 2010)

Death Valley Days article (NYT: June 2010) About Restrepo documentary

Tim Hetherington : In focus (New Yorker: April 2010)

As mentioned at the start of this post, two other photographers, Guy Martin and Michael Christopher Brown, were also injured by the same blast that killed Tim and Chris. Guy Martin’s injuries were serious. I wish him safest of recoveries.

MSNBC: Doctor: Two Western photographers recovering in Misrata

Articles – PDN: Guy Martin Critical But Stable (PDN: April 2011)

Articles – BJP: Injured British photographer in serious, but stable condition (BJP: April 2011)

Articles – Huck: Photographer Guy Martin seriously injured (Huck Magazine: April 2011)

Friday 22 April Update:

Lens blog have just put up a piece about Guy Martin…

Articles – NYT Lens: At 27, Guy Martin Becomes a Veteran (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Saturday 23 April Update:

New York Magazine: Shooters: The City’s War Photographers Mourn Two of Their Own (NY Mag: April 2011)

James Rainey: The deaths in Libya of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros hit home with their fellow photojournalists. (LAT: April 2011)

David Schonauer: The Risky History of the War Photographer (Monroe Gallery blog: April 2011)

Michael Kamber: A Group of Conflict Photographers Runs Out of Luck (NYT: April 2011)

Greg Campbell:  Chris Hondros, RIP (Salon: April 2011) How my best friend died in a combat zone

NYT At War blog:  Service Held for Combat Photographers and Doctor Killed in Misurata (NYT: April 2011)

Photojournalists embark on final journey home (Storyful.com: April 2011)

Al Jazeera: Ajdabiya honours fallen British photojournalist (Al Jazeera: April 2011)

Wall Street Journal: A look at the NYC photojournalism community in the wake of this weeks tragedies (WSJ: April 2011)

“As those close to him knew, Tim was preparing to apply to Magnum this June, while we were preparing to welcome him into our family. Many of us will now always feel there is an empty chair with his name on it during our gatherings.” – Jonas Bendiksen

Magnum Photos: Remembering Tim Hetherington & Chris Hondros (Magnum: April 2011)

Peter van Agtmael: Testimony from a Colleague: Looking Back at Tim Hetherington’s Liberia (TIME LB: April 2011)

Nic Bothma: Tribute to Chris Hondros, who ventured far with his torch (CPJ: April 2011)

Andrew Burton: Hetherington and Hondros, In Memoriam (Photographer’s blog: April 2011)

Amanda Rivkin: Tumbling through Chris Hondros’ Getty Archive (Photographer’s Tumblr: April 2011)

Guardian have put up a slideshow of some of Guy Martin’s work…

Guardian: Photographer Guy Martin capturing the conflict in Libya : in pictures (Guardian: April 2011)

Sunday 24 April Update:

Brian Till: “The Bang Bang Club,” Tim Hetherington, and Bearing Witness (The Atlantic: April 2011)

Boston Globe Big Picture blog: Photojournalist Chris Hondros: At Work in Misurata, Libya (Boston Globe: April 2011)

TIME - Libyan Rebels Dedicate Town Square to Journalist Tim Hetherington (TIME: April 2011)

Amanda Rivkin: In Memoriam: Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington (Photographer’s blog: April 2011)

InterviewsGreg Marinovich talks about conflict photojournalism, The Bang Bang Club (Daily Beast: April 2011)

NY service for Chris Hondros Wednesday 27 April at 1 pm Sacred Hearts St. Stephens Church 125 Summit St. Brooklyn

Monday 25 April update:

BBC World Service: From Our Own Correspondent:  Stuart Hughes reflects on the risks of reporting wars (BBC: April 2011)

Newsweek: The Last Witnesses (Newsweek: April 2011) War photographers Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros

Charles Glass: Photographers: The First Casualties of War (Takimag.com: April 2011)

NPPA: Funeral Services Announced For Chris Hondros 

Matt Lutton: The Chris Hondros photograph that changed me (dvafoto: April 2011)

John Louis Lucaites: Of Totems and Taboos (No Caption Needed: April 2011)

Tuesday 26 April Update:

David Carr: War, in Life and Death (NYT: April 2011) Carr on Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros

Michael Ware : To Talk With Ghosts (Newsweek: April 2011) Ware on the Pain of War Reporting

Bagnewsnotes: Remembering Chris Hondros, Part I (BNN: April 2011)

Chris Hondros’ memorial service will be streamed live here Wednesday 1pm EST.

Thursday 28 April Update: 

Barrie Peach Special Envoy’s Mission, Benghazi: In Memory of Tim Hetherington (FCO.gov.uk: April 2011)

NPPA: London Funeral For Tim Hetherington In May (NPPA: April 2011)

NPPA: Chris Hondros Remembered As A “Prophetic Humanist” (NPPA: April 2011)

Lucy Davies: Tim Hetherington: a tribute (Telegraph: April 2011)

Todd Heisler: Chris Hondros in New York (NYT Lens: April 2011)

BagNewsNotes: Remembering Chris Hondros, Part II (BNN: April 2011)

Amy Yenkin: Remembering Tim Hetherington (Open Society: April 2011)

Christina Larson: In Memoriam, Chris Hondros (Foreign Policy: April 2011)

Saturday 30 April 2011 Update:

Peter Bouckaert: The Vulture Club Tim Hetherington was a member of a special, close-knit brotherhood: people who work in war zones. (Foreign Policy: April 2011)

BagNewsNotes: Remembering Chris Hondros, Part III: Tal Afar (BNN: April 2011)

Getty Images: Fiancée of Getty Images Photographer Chris Hondros Announces Fund to Aid Photojournalists   April 28, 2011 – The fiancée of Chris Hondros, the award-winning Getty Images photographer killed on April 20 in an attack by government forces in Misrata, Libya, has announced the formation of The Chris Hondros Fund, which will encourage and assist aspiring photojournalists, aid photojournalists and other journalists in conflict zones and raise awareness of issues surrounding their work.   Christina Piaia, who was engaged to Mr. Hondros, announced that contributions could be made by check to The Chris Hondros Fund, c/o Getty Images, 75 Varick St., 5th Floor, New York, NY 10013.   “Chris devoted his life to bringing the hardships of conflicts from Kosovo to Liberia to Afghanistan to Iraq into the public eye,” said Ms. Piaia. “We are setting up this fund to honor Chris’ memory, protect his colleagues in war-torn areas, and help aspiring journalists and photographers cover these events.”   Please direct requests for information to Jim Rosenfeld at Davis Wright Tremaine, LLP, 1633 Broadway, 27th Floor | New York, NY 10019; Tel: (212) 603-6455; Fax: (212) 489-8340; Email: jamesrosenfeld@dwt.com.

1 May 2011 Update: 

Max Hastings: Death or Glory (Financial Times: April 2011)

Régis Le Sommier: My Footsteps in Your Footsteps (Paris Match: April 2011)

Washington Post: Style writer Dan Zak reflects on collaborating with photographers (WP: April 2011)

Olivier Laurent: Remembering Chris Hondros (BJP: April 2011)

Donald R. Winslow: Chris Hondros Remembered As A “Prophetic Humanist” (NPPA: April 2011

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ONE, TWO, THREE, POUR
ONE, TWO, THREE, POUR: Women poured hot water into cups for tea before the closing session of the National People’s Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Monday. (David Gray/Reuters)

WASHING UP
WASHING UP: A Somali refugee, fleeing the fighting in Libya, washed clothes at the Choucha transit camp, near the Tunisian border town of Ras Jedir Monday. (AFP/Getty Images)

SHATTERED
SHATTERED: An Iraqi soldier sat in the rubble of a suicide bomb attack in Baquba, northeast of Baghdad, Iraq, Monday. The early morning attack on an Iraqi army intelligence battalion headquarters killed 10 Iraqi soldiers and wounded 30 people. (Ali Mohammed/European Pressphoto Agency)

‘HERE’S WHAT I THINK’
‘HERE’S WHAT I THINK’: ECB President Jean-Claude Trichet, left, talked with Luxembourg Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker at the start of an intergovernmental ministerial meeting on the European Stability Mechanism at the European Union council headquarters in Brussels Monday. (Thierry Roge/Reuters)

WARY
WARY: A sign reading ‘No evacuation possible’ on a building in Newbury, Mass., refers to the nuclear power plant in nearby Seabrook, N.H. Anxiety over Japan’s quake-crippled nuclear reactors has triggered calls from U.S. lawmakers and activists for review of U.S. nuclear energy policy. (Brian Snyder/Reuters)

REFUGE IN A STORM
REFUGE IN A STORM: North African migrants arrived with an Italian export at the southern Italian island of Lampedusa Monday. Thousands of Tunisians have fled their country this year in the wake of the uprising that toppled longtime ruler Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali. (Stefano Rellandini/Reuters)

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PUSHING ON
PUSHING ON: A man pushed a woman in a wheelbarrow as they fled a suburb of Abidjan, Ivory Coast, Thursday. Heavy fighting over the country’s disputed election may augur a return to civil war, the United Nations warned Thursday. (Issouf Sanogo/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

ARMED AND READY
ARMED AND READY: A police officer patrolled in Baghdad Thursday. (Thaier al-Sudani/Reuters)

SHOUTING OUT
SHOUTING OUT: A protester shouted slogans during a demonstration demanding the resignation of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in San’a, Yemen, Thursday. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press)

ON A MISSION
ON A MISSION: A rescue worker stood atop debris in Christchurch, New Zealand, Thursday. A massive search is under way to find victims of Tuesday’s earthquake, with hopes fading for hundreds still unaccounted for in the rubble. (Hannah Johnston/Getty Images)

A SLEEP-IN
A SLEEP-IN: Demonstrators slept in the rotunda of the state capitol in Madison, Wis., in protest of Republican Gov. Scott Walker’s attempt to pass a bill that would restrict collective bargaining. Democrats in the state Assembly agreed to a deal, but Democratic senators remain unavailable. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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Born in Belgrade in 1969, Goran Tomasevic started working for Reuters as a freelance photographer in 1996 during the anti-Milosevic demonstrations. He was based in Baghdad during the Iraq conflict, in Jerusalem during tense times between the Israelis and Palestinians, and is now senior photographer in Egypt. Goran just rebased to Cairo after covering the uprising in Libya. In 2003 and 2005 Goran won the Reuters photographer of the year award. In the portfolio below, Goran recounts his experiences in conflict zones around the world.
Warning: Graphic content.

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@WorldPressPhoto just tweeted that the photo stories by the 2010 masterclass participants are now online…

Features and Essays - World Press Photo: Joop Swart Masterclass 2010 essays (WPP: November 2010)

There’s now a proper website to support injured photographer Joao Silva

InitiativesSupport Joao Silva

Awards – BJP: David Chancellor wins Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize (BJP: November 2010)

Alex Webb’s National Geographic August 2010 issue essay The Iron Silk Road now in its entire glory – 81 photos! – on Magnum website

Features and Essays - Alex Webb: The Iron Silk Road (Magnum: November 2010)

Features and Essays – Ashley Gilbertson: Down (VII Magazine: November 2010)

Features and Essays - Shiho Fukada: Nightlife Still Lively in Baghdad Neighborhood (NYT: November 2010) Article: Savoring Baghdad, Where Each Night Is a Battle

World Press Photo exhibition private view tomorrow night and open to the public from Friday…One of the winners on Guardian Eyewitness…

Blogs – Guardian Eyewitness: Joan Bardeletti : It’s a dog’s life (Guardian: November 2010) This image of a Mozambican family on a day out at the beach came second in the daily life section of the World Press Photo awards. All the winners can be seen at the Royal Festival Hall, London from this Friday until 5 December

My friend Yasmina Reggad is organising a collectives encounter at Format 2011..

Festivals /Collectives - Call for expressions of interest : Collectives Encounter 2011 at FORMAT International Photo Festival : Deadline: 20 November 2010 Expressions of interest should be sent by email only: collectives@photo-festivals.com

Articles – BJP: Morel to pursue legal case as AFP tries to settle (BJP: November 2010)

Articles - NYT: Ansel Adams or Not? More Twists (NYT: November 2010)

BooksIsland of the Spirits by John Stanmeyer (VII)

Timothy Archibald had his work on his autistic son on TIME and NYT Lens recently…here’s an interview with him..

InterviewsTimothy Archibald (popphoto.com: 2010)

Brighton Photo Biennial closes soon…Phaidon interviewed Martin Parr about it…

Interviews - Martin Parr (Phaidon: November 2010)

InterviewsDonald Weber (Colinpantall.com: 2010)

AgenciesNOOR November 2010 newsletter

PhotographersEnrico Bossan

Twitter - Mario Tama

TwitterLauren Heinz

TwitterCorbis Images

TwitterHollandse Hoogte

Veronica joined Twitter too!

Twitter - Veronica Sanchis Bencomo

Random thing we realised with Veronica having visited a bookshop in central Brighton…

[VENEZUELA. Caracas. 2006. A man in a devil costume runs around the streets of La Vega before a rally for Chavez. The act is to make fun of the idea of the "red devil of socialism."]

A crop of  Chris Anderson’s photo from his Capitolio series based in Venezuela is used on the cover of Bret Easton Ellis’ latest novel Imperial Bedrooms…

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