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"Why would they want to pull down these walls?” asks William Boyd mildly as he offers me a cup of tea in his home at Cluan Place, a predominantly Loyalist area of east Belfast.

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Grid systems are a key component of graphic design, but they’ve always been designed for canvases with fixed dimensions. Until now. Today you’re designing for a medium that has no fixed dimensions, a medium that can and will shape-shift to better suit its environment—a medium capable of displaying a single layout on a smartphone, a billboard in Times Square, and everything in between. You’re designing for an infinite canvas—and for that, you need an infinite grid system. Discover techniques and guidelines that can help bring structure to your content whatever the screen size.

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A graffiti-ridden wall dividing Protestant and Catholic communities. A teenage boy defiantly packing drugs into a battered homemade bong. A man gazing at a memorial wreath nailed to a brick wall. The whitewashing of a propaganda mural – the last of its kind. These are the scenes of modern Belfast. The images, both resonant and ordinary, are part of photographer Adam Patterson’s series, Men and My Daddy. The collection of photographs – which features both documented stills from Patterson and found images – tells the story of how the members of Northern Ireland’s largest loyalist paramilitary group, the Ulster Defense Association, are adjusting to life after the notorious Troubles.

Courtesy Adam Patterson

UDA and UVF members pose for a snapshot taken inside the Maze prison in the early 1990s. The title of Patterson's project comes from the words on the back of the picture, written by the daughter of Tommy (front row, 4th from the left), who features in the project.

“I felt it was a really interesting time; it was a transitional period,” Patterson, who was born in Northern Ireland, said of the country after the fighting had ceased. For decades Northern Ireland was largely characterized by violence and terror as the country divided into two camps: the Protestant unionists and the Catholic nationalists. In 1971, the UDA emerged as a force to be reckoned with, instigating some of the region’s most mobilized fighting. When the conflict was brought to an end and paramilitary groups pledged their commitment to the peace process, the UDA – much like Northern Ireland – was faced with the task of reinventing itself.

Intrigued by the work that was being done, Patterson built relationships with several members of the community. He began documenting one project that focused on repainting the various murals around the region, which featured armed men in what was part of a “fear campaign” established by the UDA. “The idea is to change the murals so they still symbolize the traditions of the area, but not in a violent way,” said Patterson. But soon he became interested in what the reformed men — and their offspring — were dealing with internally as well. Though many were committed to change, Patterson noted that it was a lot easier said than done: “Obviously when people sign up to the peace process minds don’t change overnight.”

As he spent more time at home in Northern Ireland, he came to recognize the different way the country’s youth, who’d only heard of The Troubles secondhand, viewed the process towards peace. “The young people kind of become frustrated that they’ve been cheated out of fighting for this nostalgic idea that’s passed down through the generations,” said Patterson. “They don’t hear the tales of misery or the prison sentences, they only hear these elements of nostalgic stories. They feel like they’ve missed out.” Photographs of youths continuing the traditions of the previous generation — such as building massive bonfires while still being wary of rival youths — attest to the deceptive allure of the country’s history. It’s what Patterson calls a “twisted nostalgia.”

Yet as he became more immersed in his work, Patterson soon felt his own feelings about The Troubles growing complicated as well. “Obviously, I was initially quite apprehensive about it because I didn’t know much about [former UDA members] besides what you’d read in the newspapers which is never good,” he said. “Whether I’ve met these guys or actually think they’re nice guys, is irrelevant to some extent. What the organization stood for and what the organization did was terrible. That’s not excused. But a lot of these guys today would think the same thing.”

Though Patterson maintains that he doesn’t shoot to “change people’s opinions,” after working in his native country he’s come to appreciate the biggest challenge facing these reformed extremists: forging a better path for their sons and daughters to follow.

“It’s about helping young people find a passion,” he says, “so they have something to try and emulate beyond their uncles and forefathers in the very recent history.”

Adam Patterson is a Northern Irish photographer. More of his work can be seen here. Patterson is currently showing work from his project A Very Normal Place at RUA RED in Dublin.

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Today marks the halfway point of the 70-day Olympic Torch relay through the United Kingdom. Since arriving in Cornwall on May 18, the flame has been carried through villages and cities, across lakes and mountain ranges, on foot, by train, on horseback, and through the air, from Cornwall to the Shetland Islands. By the time it reaches London to launch the 2012 Summer Olympics in 35 days, the torch will have passed through the hands of 8,000 torchbearers. [31 photos]

Torchbearer Peter Jack holds the Olympic Flame aloft on the Giant's Causeway, County Antrim on day 17 of the London 2012 Olympic Torch Relay on June 4, 2012 near Belfast, Northern Ireland. (LOCOG via Getty Images)

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HOLY WEEK HOLY WEEK: Men sang as they carried a crucifix outside a church before a Holy Week procession in Malaga, Spain, Thursday. (Jon Nazca/Reuters)

GOLF ROUND GOLF ROUND: Kelly Kraft prepared to hit from the sand on the seventh green during the first round of the 2012 Masters Tournament Thursday at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga. (Zuma Press)

ON THE WATER ON THE WATER: A Bangladeshi youth maneuvered bundles of bamboo along a waterway in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Thursday. (Munir uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images)

SCOOPING UP FOOD SCOOPING UP FOOD: A woman scooped up spilled rice after a truck overturned in the middle of the road in the Citi Soleil neighborhood of Port au Prince, Haiti, Wednesday. (Zuma Press)

A HIGH JUMP A HIGH JUMP: A competitor warmed up before his heat in the World Irish Dancing Championships at the Waterfront Hall, Belfast, Thursday. (Cathal McNaughton/Reuters)

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The web is buzzing, and rightly so, about Wilson Miner’s incredibly inspiring talk from the 2011 Build Conference in Belfast. You may recognize Miner’s name from his role in developing Django, as part of the team that built Apple.com or as one of the founders of Everyblock.

Miner’s talk is not your typical web developer talk; in fact, he hardly mentions the web for most of it. Rather, Miner focuses on the broader impact that technologies, and the developers and designers who create them, have on our world, and how that world in turn shapes us. Miner reminds us that we aren’t building “just websites” but shaping the world we will live in for much of the foreseeable future. And, as the Alistair Smith quote shown in the talk says, “at times of change, the learners are the ones who will inherit the world, while the knowers will be beautifully prepared for a world which no longer exists.”

So turn off your music, throw the video in fullscreen mode and give it 38 minutes. Trust us, you won’t be sorry.

After you’re done be sure to visit Miner’s website, which has links to all the material used in the talk, including books, videos, music and images for anyone who would like to learn more.

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CONGO CHAOS
CONGO CHAOS: An opposition supporter displayed what he said were fraudulent copies of election ballots in Kinshasa, Congo, Monday. Voting materials failed to arrive in some areas and several people have been killed in conflicts. More than 18,000 candidates are competing for 500 parliamentary seats. (Jerome Delay/Associated Press)

SPEAKING FRANKLY
SPEAKING FRANKLY: Rep. Barney Frank announced Monday in Newton, Mass., that he will not seek re-election for a 17th term. Mr. Frank, 71 years old, is the top Democrat on the House Financial Services Committee. (Adam Hunger/Reuters)

MIC CHECK
MIC CHECK: Graduate student Anthony Trochez yelled ‘mic check,’ a phrase that has been used at Occupy protests, three times during a University of California Board of Regents meeting at the University of California, Los Angeles Monday. Students angry about budget cuts and Occupy crackdowns spoke out. (Reed Saxon/Associated Press)

THE MANNEQUIN AND THE SEA
THE MANNEQUIN AND THE SEA: A mannequin dressed as a fisherman in a Santa Claus costume sat on a rocky outcrop in the Irish Sea near Belfast Monday. (Cathal McNaughton/Reuters)

BRICK BOY
BRICK BOY: Abdulghaffar Khamees, 12 years old, sat on a pile of bricks during his break at a factory on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Monday. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press)

PITCHING A FIT
PITCHING A FIT: Protesters held pitchforks and spades during a rally in front of a city administration building in Donetsk, Ukraine, Monday. They protested against increasing communal tariffs. (Alexander Khudoteply/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

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“Behold, I show you a mystery,” Saint Paul wrote in one of his epistles, talking of grave and final but miraculous things. The sacraments of the Catholic Church too are holy mysteries—none more so than the Eucharist. At the climax of the Mass, the act of transubstantiation turns bread and wine into the literal body and blood of Christ. Or so devout Catholics believe.

The photographer Alberto Maserin has observed a corollary transformation that accompanies this profound ritual of the Church, one that he captures in this series of pictures he has entitled “Et Nunc,” which is Latin for “And now.” It is the way an ordinary human being becomes the priestly central character in the drama of the Mass. “Over the years,” says Maserin, “I have met a lot of clergymen with all very different characters—gentlemen, intellectuals, bigoted, rude, modern etc. But once they were in the act of celebrating Mass, I found it very difficult to dissociate what they represent from who they are.” It is a kind of transubstantiation itself, as Maserin portrays in the moments he captures, simultaneously earthly and ghostly, of priests preparing for Mass. Behold, he shows you a mystery.

Though he now lives in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Maserin was born and raised Catholic in Italy. Priests and clergy were part of everyday life, not just at church but in school and in daily life, with all sorts of personalities, fatherly, avuncular, strict, funny. That is, until it came time to put on the robes and vestments for the Sacrament of the Eucharist. “We were a gang of very chaotic youths, like anybody else between six and 11,” he recalls. But somehow they all behaved when it came time to approach the altar. “Something magical was happening in front of us,” he recalls, marked by the fact that “the priest had to dress in such unusual clothes.” (It also helped, he recalls, that afterward they all got comic books for behaving.)

Nevertheless, Maserin never lost his sense of awe at the transformation of man into priest as empowered by the institution of the Church. “When the priest puts on his vestments,” he explains, “who he was before the mass, all his individuality and personality, disappears. He is transformed into somebody that could have stepped right out of the Middle Ages. It’s like he travels back in time to a different world when the power of the Church was much greater and it was the center of all education and power in Europe.”

And perhaps it is not all in the past. The power of the Mass for many Catholics is its timelessness. That is something that Maserin refers to in the words “Et Nunc.” They are taken from the Gloria Patri, the great doxology of the Church, the mighty blessing issued from the altar: Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost, as it was in the Beginning… Et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum.” That is, “is now and ever shall be, world without end.” Amen.

Alberto Maserin graduated from the University of Ulster in Belfast in 2011. His work has been published in Source magazine and it was selected for the Belfast Photo Festival and Hereford Photography Festival in 2011. He is co-founder of the Belfast Photo Factory, a non-profit collective created with the purpose of providing an environment for photographers and promoting photography through interaction with local communities.

Howard Chua-Eoan is the News Director of TIME and TIME.com. Find him on Twitter at @hchuaeoan.

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