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The Third Floor Gallery in Cardiff, Wales, is exhibiting work from Sebastian Liste’s “Urban Quilombo” series, beginning tomorrow through June 23. There will be an opening tomorrow at 7pm. Visit the gallery’s Web site for more information.

Sebastian, who is represented by Reportage by Getty Images, is a Spanish photographer now living in Brazil. In 2010, while he was earning a Master’s degree in photojournalism at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, he won the Ian Parry Scholarship for his long-term project ‘Urban Quilombo’, about the extreme living conditions that dozens of families face, who set up home in an abandoned chocolate factory in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil.

Caption: A boy jumping from a building of an abandoned chocolate factory, on March 20, 2011, in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil. (Photo by Sebastian Liste/Reportage by Getty Images)

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©Delaney Allen

I browse numerous photography blogs and magazines, probably not as many as some people, but I’m guessing more than the median photography enthusiast. There are plenty of destinations to find quality work these days but I find there are very few that have a distinct point of view, and finding quality writing about photography is still a challenge. Far too many new blogs and magazines simply want to replicate what’s been done already (me too!) or have misguided editorial missions (“we want to expose photography/photographers we love/think is great/deserves more attention/ to a wider audience!”).

These days I can get a bit cranky about internet publishing, part of which comes from my own frustrations with trying to carve out a distinct perspective for LPV, but also I think there’s a shortage of critical discussions about what we’re dong online. Nobody in general is to blame for that, after all, who really wants to talk about social media and publishing? “Is blogging dead?” “How is social media impacting photography?” discussions tend to be short of new observations and generally resort to platitudes and hype, both of which we need far less of online. The critical, combative, engaged discussions generally aren’t very well received online, and in fact the web might not even be the best venue for those type of discussions. Anyway, I digress.

With this list I want to briefly comment on a group of blogs, magazines, destinations, websites, that I have a tremendous amount of respect for at the moment. There are many others that are very good, but these have triggered something in my mind that I think is worth noting. Please feel free to disagree and create your own list! After all, it is that time of the year!

 

About: A website dedicated to contemporary fine-art photography, founded and edited by Jörg M. Colberg

Comment: Next year will be the ten  year anniversary. If there’s one blog that’s on the must read list for fine art photography, it’s Conscientious. I’ve not always agreed with Jorg but I’ve never stopped reading his articles or viewing the work he publishes. He’s simply very good at what he does and doesn’t mince words. He writes about ideas and is a curious curator. You can try to pigeon hole him, but it won’t work. This year, what I’ve respected most are his new initiatives. He jumped back on Twitter and quickly became a must follow. He published a book, “Conversations With Photographers.” He continued his publishing initiative with Meir and Mueller. He experimented with Google+ and sharing photography books on Youtube. He showed his comedic chops in a couple of very funny videos. He does what every good blogger and publisher should do: he evolves and continues the curious pursuit of his passions.

Recommended: Photography is Over

 

About: “…a unique site combining social giving and photography. Its mission is to raise funds to purchase equipment for young, emerging photographers from economically disadvantaged backgrounds from Colombia, and eventually from around the world…”

Comment: The mission statement very clearly announces what you’re to expect and it’s very admirable. Tom Griggs is a savvy publisher, creating features that tap into the active online community with a keen editorial eye. I’ve always thought that the internet was a good place to learn if you can make your way through the noise. Griggs is certainly someone who believes this and isn’t hesitant to put in the necessary work to achieve his mission. I’m very excited to see where he takes things in the next year and can’t wait to view the work from the students he’s collaborating with. This is an incredibly exciting new site and one that I hope others with aspirations for creating photography platforms will learn from in the future.

Recommended: Current Microgrant

 

About: The blog of photographer Blake Andrews.

Comment: Not much to add from what I wrote last year. Every post is still a surprise.

From 2010: You never really know what to expect from Blake.  He operates in a mental space that very few bloggers can access on a regular basis. He taps into the photography web zeitgeist in a way that adds depth to his irreverent posts.  Beyond the hijinks and humor, he’s also a fantastic and insightful writer.  When he decides to challenge an idea, he makes sure he’s thought about the argument, and offers counter points worth thinking about.

Recommended: The Sprig and Optimal Lag

 

About: To joust in the melee of contested meanings in surveillance, fine-art, documentary, amateur, institution, and virtual photographies of prisons and other sites of incarceration.

Comment: Pete Brook gets straight to the point and he’s on a mission. I was fortunate enough to meet with him twice this year and each time I came away believing more and more in his mission. His blog doesn’t ask you to think, it forces you to think. It’s always smart, finely edited and illuminating. The subject matter isn’t for everybody. It’s the type of work and issues that we’d just rather ignore. After all, of all the members of society, prisoners are the mostly likely garner little sympathy from the general public. Pete understands this challenge but confronts it head on. Realistic, honest, funny and passionate. After a few minutes browsing through his blog, you’ll come away thinking and it’ll be a nagging thought you’re not likely to shake.

Recommended: Photographing the Prostitutes of Italy’s Backroads: Google Street View vs. Boots on the Ground

 

About: LightBox, a new blog by TIME’s photo department, will explore how photography, video and the culture of images define today’s world.

Comment: As I’ve heard, LightBox was a clandestine operation by the Time photo editors that didn’t have the sanction of the corporate overlords. Thankfully for us, they’re disobedience went unpunished. It’s really a no brainer, but the cynic in me says, “jeez guys, it took you this long to get started?” Now that they’re here though, we’re exposed to a very tightly edited, engaging dose of photography on a daily basis. They have the resources and access that most independent bloggers and magazines simply never will have, and it shows in the quality and diversity of the work.

Recommended: Merry Christmas from Lee Friedlander

 

About: An independent charitable gallery (Cardiff, Wales) run by photographers Joni Karanka, Maciej Dakowicz, Bartosz Nowicki and a group of committed volunteers.

Comment: I’ve known Joni for a few after meeting him in HCSP. It’s been exciting watching what they’ve done with TFG this year. Actually, it’s pretty fucking remarkable and shows exactly what a group of passionate, intelligent photographers can achieve if they have a vision and dedication to bringing it to fruition. The TFG web presence is pretty straightforward and that’s all it needs to be. They’re able to get the word out to the right people and have been successful in raising the necessary funds to keep them afloat. In their first two years, they’ve exhibited Tomas Van Houtryve, Rob Hornstra, Ben Roberts, David Hurn, Laura Pannack, Chris Steele-Perkins, Peter Dench, and Carolyn Drake. That’s impressive. What more can you say?

Recommended: Support Us

 

About: Wayne Bremser’s Tumblr/Blog.

Comment: My favorite blog on Tumblr. Wayne is smart and the connections he makes between photographs is stimulating (“Bremser Image Telephone.”) He doesn’t write much, but when he does, it’s always very insightful and relevant. The photos run the spectrum from contemporary to historical, and are generally photographs that haven’t been heavily circulated in our visually saturated internet wasteland.

Recommended: How to Photograph the Entire World: The Google Street View Era

 

About: Facebook group of Flake Photo. “My hope is that by hosting online photo conversations in a single place the FPN will make it easier to share ideas and meet photography colleagues using Facebook.”

Comment: Maybe the years I’ve spent in photography forums has made me jaded, and kind of skeptical of these ‘community’ organizing initiatives, but I applaud Andy for his ability to bring together people that might not normally participate in photography forums. There’s plenty of conversation, insights and idea sharing happening on a weekly basis to keep my interest. It can be a great resource and it’s always interesting to read the opinions of people that don’t normally share them publicly.

Recommended: If you can get in…and tolerate the self-promotion.

 

About: The blog of duckrabbit, an award-winning digital production company.  We work with documentary audio, still photography and video to make compelling film and audio narratives for commercial, charity and broadcast clients.

Comment: There are  some blogs you like because of the attitude. duckrabbit is one of them for me. They have their nose to the grind and are tapped into the pulse of what’s happening with documentary photography and photojournalism. They’re opinionated, passionate and won’t back down from a good argument or debate. One to read for sure.

Recommended: Are photography degrees the joker in the pack?

 

About: Bagnews analyzes and reports news and media images. In an ever more visual society, BagNews seeks to better understand the levels of meaning, the underlying story lines and the various agendas reflected in the more prominent news pictures of the day.

Comment: Bag is one of those sites that I’ve said I read but more often than not only skim. Then this year I really started to read it regularly and found it incredibly interesting and insightful. The way photographs are used by media organizations in our hyper saturated, fast paced publishing world is worth taking the time to consider. For that type of analysis, there really is nowhere else to go other than the Bag.

Recommended: Taking it to the Kittens: The Pepper Spray Cop Meme — and What It Means

 

About: A Photo Editor (APE) is edited by Rob Haggart, the former Director of Photography for Men’s Journal and Outside Magazine.

Comment: The online pulse of the editorial and commercial photography world. Great resource for articles that are floating around. Jonathan Blaustein’s gallery and book reviews are long…but well worth the time investment. Recommended reading for anyone remotely curious or interested in the business side of commercial and editorial photography.

Recommended: Why Does Everyone Think They Need A Photo Book?

 

About: I examine how documentary photography and photojournalism work, the opportunities multimedia bring, and the challenges presented by the revolutions in the new media economy.

Comment: David’s thoughtful articles typically get me thinking. His subject matter might not be the most exciting for photographers but if you’re interested in publishing and how the web is evolving, creating new challenges & opportunities, then David’s blog is a must read. Always well researched, timely and engaging.

Recommended: Agencies as publishers: a new approach to photojournalism

 

About: Feature Shoot is run by photographer, photo editor and curator Alison Zavos and showcases work from up-and-coming photographers alongside established photographers who have completed a project or whose work has taken on a new direction.

Comment: Alison’s eyeballs must get really sore because she seems to see just about every photograph that’s published on the web. FS publishes an eclectic mix of work, crossing many genres and styles. What I like most about FS, is that I don’t like everything that’s published, and yet I keep coming back because I know there will be photographs that I haven’t seen before, many of which I’ll likely find interesting. Having chatted with Alison a few times, I have no doubt she’ll introduce new and exciting features in the next year.

Recommended: Parisian twins photographed by Maja Daniels

 

About: Edited by Constantin Nimigean

Comment: From Bucharest comes this serendipitous find. I’m not really sure how it came on my radar but after I subscribed I started to notice that most the photography strongly resonated with me. It was fun to see what was coming next. Sometimes he’d link to work I’d seen on other blogs but more often than not I’d be treated to work that hadn’t crossed my radar. I’m very interested to see how the site evolves in 2012.

Recommended: Valentina Riccardi – NO RENT

 

About: Edited tags from Tumblr.

Comment: It’s brilliant. Tumblr has chosen a group of photography enthusiasts to edit tags and promote work they think deserves more attention. So, what you get from the chaos of Tumblr is some semblance of organization. You can check the ‘portrait’ tag and find what’s ‘popular,’ ‘promoted’ and ‘everything’ else. They’ve made good choices in their editors too.

To show the power of Tumblr, and why I think every photographer should have a presence there, I’ll share an anecdote. I signed up in 2007 and started aggregating work under LPV/Photographs on the Brain. In four years, I gained about 2,000 followers. A few weeks ago I posted this wonderful photograph by Chris Dorley-Brown. In two days, after being ‘promoted’ it accumulated over 10,000 notes and became ‘popular.’ Within five days I’d gained nearly 4,500 followers. If Tumblr can harness this viral power and create a compelling ‘Front Page,’ they could really be onto something very interesting.

Regular reads, recommended: Unless you will, Fraction Magazine, 1000 Words, Eyecurious, Colin Pantall, LENS, New Landscape Photography, The Great Leap Sideways, Two Way Lens, Wayne Ford, dvafoto, Raw File, Shooting Wide Open, lenscratch, DLK Collection, This is the what, Search the Light, Two for the Road,urbanautica, LUCEO, Banana Leaves

Related posts:

  1. Top 15 Photography Websites of 2010
  2. Social Media & Photography: Observations Part 1 – Introduction
  3. OpEd: Appreciating Straight Photography

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WAITING FOR FOOD
WAITING FOR FOOD: Women lined up to receive food being distributed in a camp for internally displaced people in the southern Sudan village of Mayan Abun Thursday. Tens of thousands of southern Sudanese fled heavy fighting in the hotly contested border area of Abyei earlier this week. (Pete Muller/Associated Press)

FORMER FUGITIVE
FORMER FUGITIVE: A boy walked past graffiti showing Ratko Mladic, the Bosnian Serb general accused of directing the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of some 8,000 Muslim men, in Serbia Thursday. Gen. Mladic was captured Thursday after a decade and a half on the run from an indictment for genocide. (Andrej Cukic/Associated Press)

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING
LOOKING FOR SOMETHING: Angie Elbert looked for items to salvage Thursday from her grandmother’s house in Joplin, Mo., which was destroyed when a massive tornado passed through the town Sunday, killing at least 125 people. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

ARMS OUTSTRETCHED
ARMS OUTSTRETCHED: Kashmiri Muslims raised their hands as a head priest, unseen, displayed a relic believed to be a hair from the beard of the Prophet Mohammad, during special prayers Thursday at a shrine on the outskirts of Srinagar, India, on the anniversary of the death of Abu Bakr Siddiq, the first Caliph of Islam. (Dar Yasin/Associated Press)

COVERED OVER
COVERED OVER: Volcanic ash from the eruption of the Grimsvötn volcano near Vik, Iceland, covered thick moss Thursday. Earlier in the week, ash clouds forced airport closures and hundreds of flight cancellations in Britain, Germany and elsewhere in northwestern Europe. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

PLANE CRASH
PLANE CRASH: The wreckage of a small chartered plane lay on the roof of a building in Faridabad, India, Thursday. The plane was being used to ferry a patient to a New Delhi hospital when it crashed Wednesday in a residential neighborhood, killing 10 people, government officials said. (Zuma Press)

OUCH
OUCH: The Florida Marlins’ Scott Cousins, top, collided with San Francisco Giants catcher Buster Posey (in white) on a fly ball from Emilio Bonifacio during the 12th inning of a baseball game in San Francisco Wednesday. Cousins was safe for the go-ahead run, and Florida won 7-6. (Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press)

TAKING A REST
TAKING A REST: A man slept in Puerta del Sol square in Madrid Thursday during a demonstration against Spain’s economic crisis and high jobless rate. (Pedro Armestre/AFP/Getty Images)


UP IN THE STANDS! Cricket fans dressed in superhero outfits drank as rain delayed the start of play on the first day of the first Test cricket match between England and Sri Lanka at the Swalec Stadium in Cardiff, Wales, Thursday. (Ian Kingston/AFP/Getty Images)

CHICKENS COME FIRST
CHICKENS COME FIRST: A man unloaded live chickens from a truck at a wholesale poultry market in Mumbai Thursday. Food inflation in India accelerated in the week ended May 14, diminishing hopes of any near-term relief for consumers from red-hot prices and raising pressure on the central bank. (Danish Siddiqui/Reuters)

WHERE THERE WAS WATER
WHERE THERE WAS WATER: A man walked Thursday on a river shoal that appeared after the water level of the Yangtze River dropped, near Wuhan, China. China’s worst drought in a half-century is deepening, with millions in the Yangtze River region without enough drinking water. (Reuters)

G-8 SUMMIT
G-8 SUMMIT: French police forces stood guard on the beach in Deauville, France, Thursday during the Group of Eight summit. G-8 leaders expressed confidence in the rebounding global economy and said they were working on an ambitious aid program for “Arab Spring” countries. (Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

BORDER CROSSING
BORDER CROSSING: A Palestinian woman waited to cross into Egypt through the Rafah border terminal in the southern Gaza Strip Thursday. Egypt’s caretaker government said it will permanently open its border with the Gaza Strip on Saturday. (Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images)

REUSE AND RECYCLE
REUSE AND RECYCLE: A boy collected recyclable material from mounds of uncollected trash that have been a major cause of flooding during the rainy season at a riverside community in Quezon City, Philippines, Thursday. (Rolex Dela Pena/European Pressphoto Agency)

FISH FILES
FISH FILES: A worker arranged fish for sale at the Baho market in Yangon, Myanmar, Thursday. (Khin Maung Win/Associated Press)

APPLE BASKETS
APPLE BASKETS: A vendor loaded baskets of apples onto a truck at a wholesale market in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China, Thursday. (Sean Yong/Reuters)

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We’re still in Libya…

Features and Essays - Alex Majoli: Libyans Flood Tunisia’s Border Zone (Newsweek: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Christopher Morris: Muammar Gaddafi’s Tripoli (TIME: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Moises Saman: Libyan Crisis (Magnum: March 2011)

NYT’s Libya gallery updated with photos from yesterday

Earlier today, I was reading March 14 issue of TIME with a lot of Yuri Kozyrev’s photos from Libya and Yemen…

See Kozyrev’s updated Libya gallery on Time’s website here.

His Yemen work..It was interesting to compare the photos online and in print…Something I noticed regarding these Yemen ones, was that the frames in print didn’t look half as punchy as online…Love the toning…

Features and Essays – Yuri Kozyrev: On the Ground in Yemen (TIME: February 2011)

Emphas.is has launched..

Crowdfunding - Emphas.is

Articles – NYT: Financing Photojournalism by Subscription (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen’s ViaPanAm is one of the Emphas.is projects…

Features and Essays - Kadir van Lohuizen:  ViaPanAm (Project website: 2011)

Features and Essays - Graeme Robertson: Guatemalan street children (Guardian: March 2011)

I seem to recall that Boston Globe’s Big Picture has been doing several of these monthly round-ups of Afghanistan in the past… these are from February…

Features and Essays – Boston Globe: Afghanistan February 2011 (Boston Globe Big Picture: March 2011)

Speaking of Afghanistan, I just started reading Sebastian Junger’s War… First 30 pages really sucked me in…

Features and Essays – Steve Davis: Elegy for a Small Idaho Town (NYT Lens: March 2011) Davis’ website

Bruce Haley on NYT Lens and New Yorker Photo Booth…

Features and Essays - Bruce Haley: Rebuilding Lives in Former Soviet Lands (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Bruce Haley: Postcard from Nagorno-Karabakh and beyond (New Yorker: March 2011)

Haley’s website

Features and Essays - Mark Ovaska: The Search For Glacier Gold (NPR: March 2011)

Talent calls…

AgenciesMagnum Photos issues annual submission call (BJP: March 2011)

MagazinesFOAM Magazine Talent Call

Loads of interviews…

Interviews - Bruce Gilden (BJP: March 2011) Exclusive video: Bruce Gilden goes “head on” in Derby

Interviews - Stanley Greene (Youtube)

Interviews - Steve McCurry (Pro Photographers in Ireland Vimeo: 2011)

Interviews - Brent Lewin (Msnbc.com: March 2011)

Interviews - Nina Berman (APE: March 2011)

InterviewsNick Turpin on street photography’s challenges (BJP: March 2011)

Interviews Michael Wolf welcomes World Press Photo controversy (BJP: March 2011)

Interviews - Lu Guang (Greenpeace Vimeo)

Magnum Foundation has a new website…

AgenciesMagnum Foundation

Articles - BBC: Right Here, Right Now: At the Format Festival in Derby (BBC: March 2011)

Back in time…

Articles - NYT: Tom Waits and Robert Frank, New York City, 1985 (NYT Magazine: March 2011)

Articles - Guardian: The big picture: Whitechapel 1972 (Guardian: March 2011)Ian Berry’s photograph, commissioned by the Whitechapel Gallery, captures a key moment of change in an area long used to a shifting population

PhotographersTodd Bigelow

Veronica got herself a new website…

Photographers - Veronica Sanchis Bencomo

Photographers - Nick Ballon

PhotographersAnnemarie Scholz

PhotographersNicole Tung

Copyright issues…

Articles - BJP: Photographers’ Gallery finds itself at centre of copyright row (BJP: March 2011)

Articles – Jeremy Nicholl: Dear Photographers, Lady Gaga Wants The Copyright On Your Work. Oh, And By The Way, So Do We (photographer’s blog: March 2011)

VideosSimon  Roberts uploaded  new 120 Seconds short films from the last couple of weeks (Simon Roberts Vimeo: March 2011)

Articles - Verve: Boris Heger (Verve: March 2011)

Workshops - Very affordable workshop with Joseph Rodriquez in Cardiff 21-24 March, organised by Third Floor Gallery

Exhibitions and BooksThe month in photography (Guardian: March 2011) The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books

Resources - LinkedIn …. I’ve had a LinkedIn profile for about a year, but I never got around to finishing my profile and adding contacts until recently…and I’ve noticed that not only is the site good for virtual networking with colleagues I know, but also with ones I don’t. I’ve managed for instance to find names of loads of  photo editors at different newspapers and magazines through my Linked In contacts, which is pretty useful (There is of course Agency Access but you have to pay for that)…and I guess that’s what the whole linking-in is about…

Speaking of LinkedIn… I noticed that VII Photo’s LinkedIn profile starts, maybe slightly peculiarly, with: “ The third most-important entity in photography”…as one might expect something more on the lines of, say ‘one of the most important entities in photography’…anyway…if VII are the third most important entity (finding the word entity a bit odd too), then I couldn’t help but thinking what are the two most important? Magnum Photos must one of the two for sure. The other? International Center of Photography was suggested on Twitter last night as were Getty…  Not trying to pick on VII here, of course…just food for funny thought.

About Twitter. I noticed I passed the 2,000 tweets mark yesterday. I got my profile on 19 January 2009, which based on my rough calculations means something like 2,6 tweets a day. The first ever tweet of mine? ”Loves Paolo Pellegrin’s DC piece at Magnum in Motion http://tinyurl.com/8n5q64” – @photojournalism

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Features and Essays - Peter van Agtmael: The Oil Spill Spreads (TIME: June 2010)

Features and Essays - Walter Astrada: Gender Issues in India (Reportage by Getty Images: June 2010)

Features and Essays - Moises Saman: War on Drugs in Peru (NYT: June 2010)

Features and Essays – Stephan Vanfleteren: Congo, 50 Years, 50 Faces (Guardian: June 2010)

Photographers – Stephan Vanfleteren : website

Videos - Joey L: The Mentawai, Behind the Scenes Documentary (Vimeo: 2010)

Grants - Emerging Photographer Grant 2010 Recipient (burn: June 2010

! Events (London) – Carousel Slide Slam #4 :  tonight at HOST gallery : 6:30pm :  free entry

Articles – Guardian: Outside Inside by Bruce Davidson (Guardian: June 2010) This retrospective by the Magnum photographer is an epic chronicle of postwar America

multiMediaStill Dancing

Features and Essays – Niels Hougaard: Blockade on Gaza (JP Foto: June 2010)

Exhibitions (Wales) – Raymond Depardon – Villes/Cities :  Ffotogallery at Turner House, Penarth (Near Cardiff) : Opening at 6:30pm on Tuesday 29 June 2010.

Twitter - Ffotogallery

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