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The photographer Tim Greyhavens has documented the modern sites of historic anti-Chinese violence in the United States long ago, challenging his audience to draw the connections from past to present.

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From the late 1930s to 1969, amateur photographer Charles W. Cushman traveled the country documenting American life and landscapes with color photographs. Upon his death in 1972, he bequeathed his collection of 14,500 Kodachrome color slides to his alma mater, Indiana University, where they remain today. Below are a selection of Cushman’s photos from 1938 [...]

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Ideeli's CEO Paul Hurley

America's fastest-growing company started with 15 people working out of a New York City apartment. 

"If you see my apartment, having that many people in it is not right," Ideeli's CEO Paul Hurley told us.

Since its early days in 2007, the flash-sale site for luxury goods has risen to the top of Inc.'s 500 list of fastest-growing companies, with revenue of $77.7 million last year and 40,882 percent growth since its launch. 

In 2011, the New York-based company raised $41 million in its series C round of funding to focus on hiring employees and developing new categories. 

When Hurley started the company, the economy was moving into a recession and fashion-conscious people were looking for a way to satisfy their luxury goods appetite at an affordable price.

"Most people in America still don't know what a flash sale is," Hurley says, referring to the model where deals are astronomical — up to 80 percent in many cases — but only available to members. 

With 5.5 million users and 3,000 suppliers, Ideeli became a behemoth player in the retail market almost by accident. Its original business model didn't focus on retail, but rather served as a marketing platform where brands were able to connect with consumers through giveaways and some limited-time sales. 

Ideeli

When Ideeli's data illustrated that consumers were more interested in sales than the marketing side, the company pivoted its position in 2009 to satisfy this need and focused on truly becoming a flash sale model by running multiple sales and operating as a retailer.

"[Our idea] was a good idea, but it was actually someone else's idea that was better," he says.

The "someone else" is the Parisian private shopping club Vente-Privee.

"One of the things I've learned throughout my career is to always try new stuff," says Hurley, who launched seven businesses before Ideeli. "You have to have a good understanding of what's going on and aim high. If you're just surviving, that sucks. Who wants to do this? We want to be incredible and incredible for our customers."

Hurley believes his Internet retailer is a multi-billion dollar opportunity, but he's not focused on profits. Instead, he's focused on scaling. 

"The key is that all the horses have to be running at the same speed, so if you're an adrenaline junkie, you need to watch out. Scaling is about putting the right infrastructure and foundations down to win, and we're laying down the foundations to be a much larger business.

"People underestimate how hard it is to make money, to actually make a profit. I'm not even thinking about the people who build a company and then sell it right away. I'm talking about building something where millions of consumers are actually happy you exist."

Ideeli

For competition, Hurley keeps a close eye on stores like H&M and J. Crew as well as e-commerce competitors Gilt Groupe, Rue La La and HauteLook.

"The retail business alone is $350 billion per year. We're thinking about how the consumers shop. They have a lot of choices here. E-commerce is not some new unicorn. It's retail. But this business is super unforgiving if you're not good at operations."

Since its launch, Ideeli moved into a downtown building in May 2008, but within a year, the company packed up again and moved into its current Chinatown location in the same building as Dolce & Gabbana. After taking over two additional floors in the same building, the company's space is "packed tight" again with around 250 employees. 

"The fun thing is, whenever you move into a new place, you think it's giant and wonder how you'll ever fill it up," Hurley says. "Then 20 minutes later, you've got people sitting on each other's laps. It's a joke here that as you get a promotion, you also get smaller desks."

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 From Broadway to the Battery


This is an art book done in line art by German illustrator Robinson (1910-1994). On the book jacket, it says he has created hundreds of thousands of drawings, not just for New York. That sounds incredible but not hard to believe when you go through the pages.

It was first published in 1967 and this is a very welcome reprint. Looking at the illustrations is like traveling back in time to 60s New York, Manhattan precisely. The impressive skyscrapers were already up, and the 60s cars are all still crowding the streets.

The aerial drawings of Manhattan are breathtaking in astonishing detail. There are many in the book. New York Line By Line only has 64 pages, but the format is huge, great for showing off the line art.

I've been to Manhattan on holiday before and these drawings gives me fond memories of the place. Many are from the exact spot where I stood. There are drawings from the top of Empire State Building, at Park Avenue, Chinatown, Grand Central Station, NY Public Library, Bryant Park, Radio City Music Hall, St. Patrick's Cathedral,Rockefeller Center, Time Square, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Central Park, Kennedy Airport and more.

Through the drawings, you can see how New York has changed with its people and landscape. Buildings at Time Square were just a few floors tall back then. Today, their top can't even be captured in photographs.

I like the last section where they compare numbers from the 60s New York with present day. There were 3000 shoe stores back then and now only 620. It's interesting to see how businesses have evolved through those numbers, many which changed drastically.

This is an impressive and astonishing book.

If you want to travel even further back in time, check out Denys Wortman's New York.

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New York, Line by Line: From Broadway to the Battery is available at Amazon (US | CA | UK | DE | FR | IT | ES | JP | CN) and Book Depository (US | UK)

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

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The video for Get Got, from Sacramento hip hop crew Death Grips, does all it can to make you think that the we’ve come very close to the end of our tenure here on Earth. By matching lo-fi digital production with their apocalyptic soundscapes, they show that craftsmanship matters more than gloss.

“With video concepts, we generally discuss a certain feel and aesthetic/location that we are catching and start there,” says Death Grips drummer, Zach Hill. “There’s always heavy improvisation involved in the filming process and the videos really takes shape in the edit.”

Hill teams up with band members Andy Morin and Stefan Burnett to concept, direct and edit all the group’s videos. For Get Got the crew shot on location in San Francisco’s Chinatown and on the capitol steps in Sacramento.

“We liked the idea of symbolically holding the authorities (red and blue lights) in our own hands on their own front door,” says Hill. “We fully expected to ‘get got’ by the police on the capitol grounds while filming this one. They definitely saw us filming. We felt the surveillance, but majestically, they acted like they didn’t see it happening and turned a blind eye.”

Even though it was probably last year’s tape, Exmilitary, that got them a two-record deal with Epic, it’s got to be the constant stream of videos that shot their work all over the web.

They always shoot on cheap Canon video cameras and they’ve never made a video that costs more than $20. It works, and they even manage to throw in a few Bad Brains references with a lighting strike to the capitol building’s dome.

The work feels heavily influenced by GIF culture and equally glitchy internet visuals. The production is so far away from what we see every day from the plastic-looking DSLR video that Canon and Nikon has made so ubiquitous. Catching a new video from Death Grips becomes a refreshing reminder that motion and music can be represented together and still innovate without having to invest in a hi-def, cookie-cutter capture format.

Death Grips are certainly not the only music act working in this manner, but for the last year they’ve been consistently sticking with it. They’ve inspired us at Raw File to think a little differently about visual aesthetics, so we thought we’d share the love.

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An Indonesian ethnic Chinese man prays during the Chinese Lunar New Year celebration at Dharma Bakti temple in Chinatown in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, Jan. 23, 2012. Divers of the Nucleo Operatori Subacquei Guardia Costiera conduct a search and rescue operation that led to the discovery of the body of a woman inside of the ship [...]

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The lunar new year is celebrated throughout the world, but especially in Asia when the lunisolar calendar ticks off a new cycle. This year is the Year of the Dragon on the Chinese zodiac, and is viewed as very auspicious. In China, the holiday is known as 春节, the Spring Festival, and kicks off 15 days of celebration. It also triggers the largest human migration in the world, as hundreds of millions of Chinese trek to see families. Gathered here are images of the preparation for the holiday, the travel scene in mainland China, and celebrations in many parts of the world. 新年快乐! -- Lane Turner/雷恩 (38 photos total)
Chinese folk artists perform the lion dance at a temple fair to celebrate the Lunar New Year on January 22, 2012 in Beijing. Also known as the Spring Festival, which is based on the Lunisolar calendar, it is celebrated from the first day of the first month of the lunar year and ends with the Lantern Festival on the Fifteenth day. (Feng Li/Getty Images)

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As 2011 draws to a close, Framework looks back on an eventful, tumultuous year, documented by the photojournalists of the Los Angeles Times.

It was a year marked by the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan; the Arab Spring in North Africa and the Middle East, with rebel uprisings and hard-fought battles resulting in the fall of Egypt’s president, Hosni Mubarak, and the capture and death of Libya’s Moammar Kadafi; and the humanitarian crisis of continued famine in Africa.

2011 also saw the somber 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks of 2001; the rise of the Occupy Wall Street movement; the royal wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton in London and their subsequent Southland visit; and the involuntary manslaughter trial, conviction and sentencing of Michael Jackson’s personal physician.

Carmageddon in Los Angeles, anticipated with dire predictions of monumental gridlock, turned out to be not so disruptive after all.

Almost nine years after the invasion of Iraq, the war was declared officially over with the withdrawal of all U.S. combat troops and their return home — in time for the holidays, no less.

As always, the worlds of entertainment, sports and celebrity are part of the gallery, adding a light, colorful touch to a memorable year.

Enjoy the look back with us, and have a wonderful 2012.

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