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Grozny

Original author: 
(author unknown)

After two Chechen brothers were named in connection with the Boston Marathon bombings, Reuters photographer Maxim Shemetov took this collection of images titled "Inside Modern Chechnya" showing daily life in the semi-autonomous Russian region known for a centuries-­old tradition of defying Moscow’s rule. Shemetov focused on the area in and around the capital of Grozny. -- Lloyd Young ( 28 photos total)
Members of a Chechen dance group pose for photographers at a government-organized event marking Chechen language day in the center of the Chechen capital Grozny on April 25. (Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)     

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Original author: 
Maria Turchenkova

Despite the reduction of large-scale military operations 10 years ago in Chechnya, a guerrilla war waged by Islamic fundamentalists rages on, and has brought a striking level of violence and bloody insurgency to the neighboring Caucasus republic of Dagestan.

For decades, and in much of the world’s eyes, all the news coming from the North Caucasus seemed focused on the cataclysm in Chechnya. Now, with Grozny slowly emerging from decades of chaos, Dagestan – the largest, most heterogeneous and, today, the most violent republic in the North Caucasus region – is raising its international profile, but for all the wrong reasons.

With a population of about 3 million people, Dagestan — bordering Chechnya, with the Caspian Sea to the east and Georgia and Azerbaijan to the south — is comprised of more then 40 ethnic groups. Ethnic Russians make up roughly four and half percent of the republic’s total population, while political power is held mainly by the two largest groups: the Avar and Dargin, both of whom practice Sufism, or the region’s traditional brand of Islam. Recently, however, Salafism — a puritanical form of Islam practiced largely in Saudi Arabia — has begun to make inroads, further complicating the already tangled political and religious picture.

Split by seemingly intractable social and religious differences and with almost a half of its territory locked down under a special security regimen (CTO, or “counter-terrorist operation”), Dagestan’s populace endures martial law, rigid curfews and random searches enforced by the Russian military.

For most Russian citizens, meanwhile, the North Caucasus is peopled not by neighbors or citizens but by stereotypes. A mountain region, alien and dangerous, it is populated (in the Russian popular imagination) by suicide bombers and terrorists. Period.

The Jamaats—local Islamic societies—comprise the vast majority of active anti-Russian Islamist fighters in Dagestan. Numbering somewhere around 500, by best estimates, Jamaats manage to replace those killed in action with newly joined militants in a remarkably timely manner. The reason for this renewable source of fighters is, in fact, rather simple: namely, the fundamentalists find fertile ground to propagate their ideas in the region’s remote, mountainous villages — as well as via the Internet. As the Dagestan justice system is largely ruled by nepotism, Russian law and order doesn’t have real power and most people find it impossible to receive justice from local authorities. Jamaats’ leaders, meanwhile, claim to be the “legitimate authority of Dagestan” and are candid about their aim of establishing a “fair society” based on Shari’a law. As the years pass, more and more people convert to Salafism.

Dagestan’s society is still deeply split. The gap between the richest and the poorest is enormous — and, like everywhere else, is rapidly growing. Conservatives, including many traditional Muslims, who still feel an allegiance to Russia certainly do not accept the “Islamization” of their country and their culture, while many others simply vote with their passports — emigrating from the republic entirely. The men, women and children who stay behind must somehow find ways to endure in the midst of their country’s hidden war.

Maria Turchenkova is a freelance documentary photographer based in Moscow. She was recently selected to attend the 2013 World Press Joop Swart Masterclass.

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Original author: 
(author unknown)

VICE Loves Magnum: Thomas Dworzak Takes Photos of Sad Marines and Taliban Poseurs

Magnum is probably the most famous photo agency in the world. Even if you haven’t heard of it, chances are you’re familiar with its images, be they Robert Capa’s coverage of the Spanish Civil War or Martin Parr’s very British holiday-scapes. Unlike most agencies, Magnum’s members are selected by the other photographers on the agency, so becoming a member is a pretty grueling process. As part of an ongoing partnership with Magnum, we will be profiling some of their photographers over the coming weeks.

Thomas Dworzak joined Magnum in 2000. His books often deal with war. His first, Taliban, was a found photo project which freaked out a lot of Americans who didn’t want to see what the Taliban looked like when they were fooling about. M*A*S*H IRAQ examined the daily lives of US Medevac teams in Iraq, and his latest book,Kavkuz, explored the impact years of brutal war had on the Caucasus region. Oddly enough, in spite of shooting in some of the most hellish conditions imaginable, he thinks Paris is the hardest place to work in.

VICE: You are often described as a “war photographer.” How do you feel about that?
Thomas Dworzak:
 It’s a label. What are you going to do about it? I’m not going to say I am not one, because I do go, and I used to go very often, to these conflict areas. But there are definitely people out there who are more into combat than me. There is a scale of how much involvement in war one has. And I’m not all the way up there.

How did working in Chechnya during the war there differ from your time in Iraq?
I think in Chechnya, I was more “on the ground.” I was hitchhiking around, trekking alone. You would talk to the fighters, you would spend time with them, and then if there was an attack you would arrive with them. It was all done in a very disorganized, one to one, personal way. I think Chechnya was very extreme as a war, compared to anything that I have seen since.

Extreme in what way?
Just the sheer amount of stuff I saw flying around. It was an atrocious war. Bosnia was very brutal of course, but there was not so much physical destruction, it was more killing and revenge on a very personal and human level, between neighbors or whatever. Chechnya was brutal in every way. The destruction of Grozny reached a level I had not seen until then, and haven’t seen since. I guess you might come across something like it now in Aleppo, for example. There was no accreditation when I was working there, no paperwork. I learned Russian so I could talk to the fighters. They were welcoming, so I spent time with them. Whereas in Iraq and Afghanistan I was embedded. You get your piece of paper and the military has to take care of you.

In what way did that affect your work? What’s your view on the embed format, do you think it worked well?
I think there is a strange kind of freedom in the structure of an embed. A lot of people have been bitching about it, going on about the embed being “the end of press freedom” and all that, but I don’t really think that’s true. I don’t know anything about Iraq really; I haven’t seen Iraq outside of the American point of view for so long now. But if I choose to cover the American angle, then an embed is not a bad way to do it. Because it is so institutionalized, you can actually move around and do a lot. You don’t have to beg, you don’t have to worry about anything. It’s a bit duller in that sense. You just have to follow the guys in front of you. And there are not that many decisions to be made. I find embeds pretty relaxing in that way.

Was your M•A•S•H• IRAQ project concluded over one single embed?
It was almost all embed work. I don’t want to over-emphasize the fact that some photos—just a few—weren’t taken in embeds as it’s meant to be an embed book. I don’t know, maybe it was two years or three years, something like that. The core of the work was done over a year, I did maybe five or six embeds with the medical units over that time.

Continue + More Photos

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Davide Monteleone traces the genesis of his new book of photographs, Red Thistle, to 2007, when he heard about a film festival going on in Grozny, the capital of Chechnya. At the time, Chechnya had been locked down for nearly a decade under a special security regime. Known as the KTO, the Russian acronym for “counter-terrorist operation,” the regime had meant years of martial law, curfews and random searches enforced by the Russian military. Not exactly the place for something like Sundance–the region’s film festival was a fluke, a rare chance for some foreigners to have a look around, and Monteleone took it. With his companion, Lucia Sgueglia, who would end up writing the text for Red Thistle, he would sneak out of the guarded hotel to explore Grozny.

“We did this until the Russian troops would catch us and take us back,” Monteleone said. “Then we would go out again.”

What he found was a region slowly restoring the rhythm of life—a weird, entrancing, pensive rhythm—after two devastating wars with Russia fought between 1994 and 2000. After the second war, the U.N. had deemed Grozny “the most destroyed city on earth,” but with billions of dollars in postwar Russian aide, the city had been rebuilt and revived. Over the next five years, Monteleone would return to Chechnya and the surrounding regions of the Caucasus Mountains as often as once a month.

“A lot of work had been done on the wars and the human rights abuses,” he said. “We wanted to study everyday life.”

In 2008, the KTO regime was lifted in Chechnya and travel there became easier, but life was still colored by Russia’s shadow and the legacy of the Soviet Union, which ruled this predominantly Muslim region for almost 70 years. So the settings of Monteleone’s photographs—from the beat-up old Zhiguli cars to the destitute apartment blocks—have a distinctly Soviet texture, a drab, heavy latticework that seems to press against the people inside it. Smiles are not common on the faces in his photos, but they seem to have a stubborn glow amid the grayness that surrounds them.

A common theme, predictably, is death, which is so insistent that it approaches a dulled ubiquity. If there is a kind of music to life in the Caucasus, mortality is its drumbeat in Monteleone’s work. In one frame, a woman in a black headscarf hurries along the sidewalk, not seeming to notice a stream of blood flowing toward her from a bull that was slaughtered in the street. There are weddings and funerals, and both seem to occasion equal measures of melancholy and warmth. At one wake in Chechnya, a group of men perform the Dhikr, an Islamic ritual which, in the local Sufi tradition, involves hours of rhythmic dancing and chanting until the men fall into a collective trance.

“You know that you’re in Russia,” says Monteleone. “But at the same time, life is structured in such a way that you feel closer to Persia or the Middle East.”

That is part of the duality of the Caucasus, which remains a world between worlds. The ongoing insurgency against Russian rule creeps in to remind you that the war goes on—a house stands demolished in one frame after Russian tanks moved in for a counter-insurgency strike—but there is also reconciliation: a group of men from one family walk down a mountain toward a mosque, where they resolve a blood feud with another family that had caused generations of strife. The overall picture is sad but not despondent, and there is resilience in almost every frame.

The unifying image of The Red Thistle comes from the opening scene in Lev Tolstoy’s novella Hadji Murat, which begins with a man trying to pluck a crimson thistle from a ditch in the Caucasus mountains. The thistle fights back, stabbing his hand with its brambles, and only gives in when he has frayed the stem and mangled the flower. “What energy and tenacity!” the man thinks. “With what determination it defended itself, and how dearly it sold its life.”

Simon Shuster is TIME’s Moscow reporter.

Davide Monteleone is a photographer with the VII agency. See more of his work here. Monteleone’s latest book, Red Thistlewas recently released by Dewi Lewis publishing.

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In 2010, when she was working for a news agency in Moscow, Diana Markosian asked to be sent to Chechnya. The photographer, who is Russian but studied in the United States, was 20 years old and curious about the history of the embattled region.

“They wouldn’t send me so I decided to go by myself,” she remembers. “Grozny became my destination and later became my home.”

Markosian went back repeatedly after that first visit and soon became a specialist in covering a region where, she says, many of her colleagues don’t want to go. She moved to Chechnya last November to live there full-time. But, she says, her close relationship with the area doesn’t mean that it’s not a risky place to live and work—kidnappings are frequent, she says—or that such risk does not affect her photographs. Although Russian leaders declared the region normalized and peaceful three years ago today, following more than a decade of wars against rebels, life is still fraught. They may not appear in the frames, but Chechen authorities are the unseen presence in the work shown in this gallery, a personal project through which Markosian addresses the lives of girls growing up in Chechnya.

“It’s one thing to come here for a week like I used to do. It’s another to start living here, and not only hear what these women are going through but actually experience it yourself,” she says.

Markosian says that Chechnya has experienced a wave of Islamicization since the collapse of the Soviet Union: religious dress codes are mandatory, young (and polygamous) marriages are frequent and gender roles are increasingly conservative. The president, Ramzan Kadyrov, has said publicly that women are the property of their husbands. And at the same time, high unemployment has meant that many young women who are already becoming mothers still live with their own parents.

For Markosian, this has meant that—after she was told by security officers that her belt full of lenses made her look like a suicide bomber—she carries a handbag rather than the photographer’s gear bag to which she was accustomed, and that she has gotten used to being questioned or having her photographs deleted by officers. “As a regular citizen I don’t feel danger,” she says, “but just because I’m doing something a little out of the ordinary, especially for a woman, I’m looked at more carefully.”

It has also changed her working process. Because of what she says is widespread but justified distrust, people are wary of being shown doing anything that could be perceived as unusual. Something as seemingly innocent as a photograph of a woman smoking a cigarette could have dire consequences. The fear of being different has been a particular obstacle for photographing teenagers, as their parents are worried about what might happen if their children are seen as nonconforming.

But Markosian says that, by spending weeks with her subjects before taking a single photograph, she has been able to gain the access necessary for the project. And, in doing so, she says she has found these women to be a mirror for Chechnya as a whole. “That entire idea of a generation building itself and the resilience these girls have really motivated me,” she says. “They are trying to make something of themselves at the same time that this region is trying to build after almost two decades of war.”

Diana Markosian is a photographer based in Chechnya. See more of her work here.

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Features and Essays

Syrians in our minds…

Tomas Munita has done great work for the New York Times from over there… I can hardly imagine how difficult the conditions…

Tomas Munita: Fighting Intensifies in Syria (NYT) See also

Tomas Munita: A Day With the Arab League Monitors in Syria (NYT)

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Update Wednesday 8 February 2012:

Time Lightbox posted a slideshow this morning by Italian photographer Alessio Romenzi, on assignment for Time in Homs.  Rather than wait until next week, want to share the link to the work here…

Alessio Romenzi: Syria Under Siege (Lightbox)

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Antonio Bolfo’s NYPD: Impact on NYT Lens…Always loved this work… Saw it exhibited in Perpignan 2010…Definitely worth another look..

Antonio Bolfo: NYPD: Impact (NYT Lens)

Andrea Bruce from Kabul

Andrea Bruce: Children in Kabul (NYT)

Here’s Lauren Lancaster from Kabul too…Completely new photographer to me… See later in this post for Lancaster’s photos from GOP primary in Florida…posted on New Yorker’s Photo Booth

Lauren Lancaster: Youth in Kabul (Le Monde M Magazine)

GOP Primaries

Ricardo Cases from Florida on assignment for Time…Lightbox slideshow…

Plenty got printed in the magazine too…

Ricardo Cases: A Sunshine State of Mind for the Florida Primary (Lightbox)

Charles Ommanney: Newt Gingrich on the Florida Campaign Trail (Newsweek)

Charles Ommanney: US Presidential Campaign 2012 (Reportage by Getty Images)

Peter van Agtmael: On the Campaign Trail with Newt Gingrich (Lightbox)

Lauren Lancaster: Running in Florida (Photo Booth)

Massive Florida Primary gallery on NYT with photos by Heisler,Crowley,Yam,Litherland, Thayer, and Henry…

NYT (various photographers): The Florida Primary

To other issues… Here’s a link to Scottish photographer David Gillanders’  multimedia The Neglected…Finished sometime last year, but only discovered this last week…

David Gillanders: The Neglected : Street Children in Ukraine (Vimeo)

Pete Pin: The Cambodian Diaspora (Lightbox)

Sally Ryan: Black Jews of Chicago (zReportage)

Marvi Lacar: A ‘visual diary’ of depression (CNN photo blog)

Bruno Barbey: Istanbul (Magnum)

photo: Steve Liss

New Yorker (various photographers): American Poverty (Photo Booth)

Evgenia Arbugaeva: Siberian Memories (NYT Lens)

photo: Jason Andrew

Financial Times (Photos by Jason Andrew and Brandon Thibodeaux): Atheism in America (FT)

After reading Toni Greaves’ interview about her Radical Love series last week on BJP, I visited her website and ended taking a look also at the multimedia version of the project, which was posted on Time.com while back… Really enjoyed… Very good audio…

Toni Greaves: Radical Love: The Sisters of Summit, NJ (TIME)

Maija Tammi: Small Sizes and Great Love (Polka) multimedia

Lise Sarfati: She (Guardian)

Stephanie Sinclair: A Day with Warren Buffett (WSJ)

Denis Sinyakov: Moscow’s Migrant Workforce (Msnbc)

Veronique de Viguerie: With Libyan Arms, Mali Fighting Is Revived (NYT)

Adam Ferguson: Karen Rebels Remain Defiant (NYT) Myanmar

Brandon Thibodeaux: War Torn: An Iraq War Veteran’s Story (WSJ channel on Youtube) video

Andre Bruce: Leaving Iraq (NOOR)

Ayman Oghanna: Iraq (Polka)

Luis Carlos Barreto: Tropical Light (NYT Lens)

Lot of new features on Panos Pictures site….

Ivan Kashinsky: Guaranda Carnival (Panos)

Karla Gachet and Ivan Kashinsky: Dance of the Devils (Panos) Gachet and Kashinsky are both represented by Panos, but they also have a common website at Runa Photos. See later in this post for their brand new iPad App…

Xavier Cervera: Revolucion o Muerte (Panos)

Stuart Freedman: The Englishman’s Eel (Panos)

Jason Larkin: Power to the People (Panos)

Sergey Maximishin: The Institute (Panos)

Dean Chapman: Fading Memories (Panos)

Mark Henley: The Vaults (The Atlantic)

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala: Tahrir, 1 Year On (Reportage by Getty Images)

Nadia Shira Cohen: Egyptians (NYT Lens)

Ed Ou: Egyptian Youth (Reportage by Getty Images)

Alessandro Gandolfi: The Catacombs of Las Vegas (Parallelo Zero)

Brenda Ann Kenneally: The Last Nights at the Western Hotel (Lightbox)

Kadir van Lohuizen: Money, God, and Criminals (NOOR)

Liu Tao: Blood, Sweat, and Tears (zReportage)

Maciek Nabrdalik: Faith : Polish Catholicism (VII)

Adrian Fisk: Dilli Purani Dilli Naye (Foto8)

Reed Young: Brownsville (Lightbox)

Phil Moore: DRC Elections (Photographer’s website)

Peter Turnley: Cuba : A Grace of Spirit (Photgrapher’s website)

Michael Carlebach: South Florida (NYT Lens)

Jean-Marie Simon: Guatemala’s War Years (NYT Lens)

Bharat Choudhary: Young Muslims (NYT Lens)

Jordi Ruiz Cirera: The Mennonites of Bolivia (Foto8)

Olga Kravets, Maria Morina and Oksana Yushko: Grozny: Nine Cities  (PDN Photo of the Day)

David Dawson: Working with Lucian Freud (Lightbox)

Michael Tsegaye: Fighting Forgotten Tropical Diseases (BBC)

Thomas Hulton: The Lam Family of Ludlow Street (NYT Lens)

Espen Rasmussen: Transit (The Atlantic)

New Yorker (photos by Sylvia Plachy and Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao): Battle of Panoramas

Andrew Burton: Best of 2011 (Photographer’s website)

iPad Apps

Gerd Ludwig’s The Long Shadow of Chernobyl

Short Stories: From Ecuador to Tierra del Fuego by Karla Gachet and Ivan Kashinsky

Polka Magazine iPad App

Interviews

Gina #12 Oakland, CA 2009, courtesy Brancolini Grimald  by Lise Sarfati

Lise Sarfati (Telephoto)

Lise Sarfati (Guardian) related: exhibition review

Steve Pyke on reviewing over 8,000 images for the World Press Award (PicBod)

Steve Pyke from the World Press Photo Award on fifteen hour days (PicBod)

World Press Photo:  Members of the jury share their perspectives on the winners and the judging process.

Ed Kashi (Bangkok Post)

Anthony Shadid (Mother Jones)

Doug Mills (NYT Lens)

Barton Silverman (NYT Lens)

James Whitlow Delano (Asiasociety)

Harry Hardie on Lynsey Addario & Tim Hetherington’s ‘In Afghanistan’ exhibition

Ed Ou (Wired Rawfile blog)

Venetia Dearden (e-photoreview)

Kael Alford (Vimeo)

Yunghi Kim (Tiffinbox)

Leo Maguire (BJP)

Guy Martin (Ideas Tap)

JB Russell (shootlove)

Elinor Carucci (PicBod)

Brett Ziegler (NYT Lens)

Articles

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Update 8 Wednesday 2012:

Just as I had finished the post yesterday, we got news that Magnum photographer Sergio Larrain has passed away.

Sergio Larrain (1931-2012)

photo: Rene Burri

Here’s a Slate slideshow celebrating Larrain’s work…

LONDON—Baker Street Station, 1959.

Slate: Sergio Larrain 1931-2012

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PDN: Swedish Journalists Endure Inhumane Conditions in Ethiopian Jail

Slate: Can Five Great Photographers Really Collaborate? | Postcards from America: A Magnum Collaboration

Lightbox: Postcards From America: The Box Set

photo: Nick Waplington

FT: Ways of Seeing

The Sacramento Bee: To our Readers: The Sacramento Bee fired longtime photographer Bryan Patrick

UNHCR: Nansen Award winner turns her lens on the Flowers of Afghanistan

BJP: The Photographers’ Gallery will reopen its London premises on 19 May with an exhibition of Edward Burtynsky’s Oil

Phaidon: Getting to know the face behind the photograph

BJP: Crowdfunding platform Emphas.is launches publishing arm

BJP: National Media Museum is set to start work on its London-based gallery

BJP: Firecracker Grant

BJP: Photographer wins copyright infringement case

NYT Mag 6th Floor blog: The Auckland Project

PDN: US Falls To #47 On Press Freedom Index, Thanks to Occupy Crackdowns

TIME Lightbox Tumblr: Joachim Ladefoged had only 8 minutes to photograph Messi

Allen Murabayash: Why I love Photography (PhotoShelter blog)

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Lucy Nicholson | Related on Reuters photo blog

Dallas Morning News Photo blog: Big Miracle the movie – The story behind the real photo | How a photo from an almost botched Arctic assignment inspired a Drew Barrymore film

FT: Photographer Lise Sarfati studies the lives of teenagers and young women in America

Firecracker: February 2012 newsletter

The National Press Club: Attorney details backlash against photojournalists

Verve: Sam Phelps

Verve: Anne-Stine Johnsbåten

Verve: Rafael Fabrés

LA Times Framework blog: Six Photography Game Changers

PDN: Greenfield Wins Sundance Director Prize

BJP: Keeping the tabs: The best account management applications for photographers

New Yorker: Close Inspection: Magnum Contact Sheets (Photo Booth)

Mike David: Where’s the line on toning photos, especially for contests? (Mike Davis blog)

multiMedia 

new issue…. 7.7 : Documentary Photography Digital Magazine

Exhibitions

Labyrinth Photographic Printing : ‘A Year in Development’ Exhibition’ – 17th February – 1st March 2012 : London

Behind the Scenes of Steve McCurry’s Rome exhibition (Phaidon) video

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

photo: Justin Maxon

Magnum Emergency Fund Announces 2012 Grantees (Lightbox)

Aperture 2011 Portfolio Prize Finalists

Sony World Photography Awards 2012 Shortlist Announced | on BJP

PDN Annual

FotoEvidence : Book Award

Foam Talent call 2012 now open

Getty Images relaunches creative grants programme

Gordon Parks Photo Contest Deadline July 2

Agencies and Collectives

Magnum Photos : February 2012 newsletter

NOOR newsletter February 2012

Reportage by Getty Images: Peter Dench joins Reportage

Reportage by Getty Images: Introducing John D McHugh as a featured contributor

TerraProject Newsletter

Crowd funding

UK Uncensored by Peter Dench (Emphas.is)

Faded Tulips by William Daniels (Emphas.is) featured on Telephoto

Trading to Extinction by Patrick Brown (Emphas.is) Related on NYT Lens

Workshops

Visual Storytelling in an Open Society: workshop for Egyptian photographers : Deadline for applications is Sunday FEBRUARY 12, 2012 [link to info on Lightstalkers]

2012 Noor – Nikon Masterclass : South Africa | on BJP

MediaStorm multimedia storytelling workshop in London at the Frontline Club on February 20.

Jobs

Bloomberg: Staff Photo Editor – London

Photographers

Naomi Harris has a new website…

Naomi Harris

New website also by Stuart Freedman

Ricardo Cases

Eric Thayer

Eunice Adorno

Ivan Kashinsky

Ed Ou has added a multimedia section to his website…

Ed Ou : multimedia

Adrian Fisk

Jess Ingram

Jordi Ruiz Cicera

To finish off…. ‘War Photography and Weddings’. Ahem. That really is an interesting business card via @Kiehart

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ON THE WAY HOME
ON THE WAY HOME: U.S. military personnel rested on board a plane that left Baghdad Thursday. After nearly nine years of war, thousands of casualties and more than $800 billion spent, the U.S. military formally ended its mission in Iraq. (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)

TOXIC BOOZE
TOXIC BOOZE: A woman comforted a relative who fell ill after consuming bootleg liquor containing toxic methanol at a hospital in a village outside Kolkata. The cheap, illicit brew killed at least 143 people and sickened dozens more, officials said Thursday. (Rupak De Chowdhuri/Reuters)

FEELING FAINT
FEELING FAINT: A man fainted as about 1,000 pensioners marched through central Athens on Thursday to protest austerity measures that include pension and salary cuts. (Aristidis Vafeiadakis/Zuma Press)

PUTIN’S SHOW
PUTIN’S SHOW: A woman in Grozny, Chechnya, watched Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin’s 4½-hour marathon call-in show on national TV Thursday. Sharp-tongued and defiant, Mr. Putin denounced those protesting vote fraud as stooges of the West. (Musa Sadulayev/Associated Press)

CONFRONTATION
CONFRONTATION: A Bahraini police officer spoke to Zainab al-Khawaja, a human rights activist and daughter of a prominent opposition leader, during a rally Thursday near a highway leading to the capital, Manama. (Reuters)

WHITE DECEMBER
WHITE DECEMBER: A citizen carrying a child walked through the snow in Weihai, in east China’s Shandong Province. (Yu Qibo/Xinhua via Zuma Press)

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Features and Essays 

Egypt, Cairo, Tahrir….

Moises Saman has been kicking ass with his Cairo work…NYT front page pics on several occasions during the last two weeks…This is the slideshow a lot of people were talking about over the weekend…

Moises Saman: Cairo Undone (NYT) Cairo Undone on Magnum site.

Saman hit the front page also today (November 29) with an image  (to-me maybe not so obvious choice) seen below, which can be found online in the NYT’s Egypt Turmoil slideshow…featuring work by various photographers.

photo: Moises Saman

Below image ran on the front page of the International Herald Tribune last week….You can see it in black and white in this Saman’s tweet…The colour version is up on Magnum Photos site…

Moises Saman: Unrest in Cairo: Egypt’s Revolution Continues (Magnum)

Miguel Angel Sanchez: Egyptians (NYT Lens) Angel Sanchez’s website

Davide Monteleone: Egypt Waiting (VII)

Espen Rasmussen: Beyond Tahrir Square (Panos)

Guy Martin: The Egyptian Revolution (Panos)

Trevor Snapp: Revolution Round Two? (Global Post) Full edit on photographer’s archive

NB. See later in this post regarding the latest TIME cover on Egypt that ran on all markets except the US. Filed under Articles.

Tim Hetherington’s last images on Magnum Photos…

Credit: Tim Hetherington. LIBYA. Misurata. April 20, 2011. Tim’s last photograph.

Tim Hetherington: The Libya Negs (Magnum)

Occupy Wall Street…

Christopher Anderson: OWS (New York Magazine)

Noticed that Ashley Gilbertson’s OWS series shot in October had sadly disappeared from VII site, but the reason turned out to be that New Yorker had put him on assignment (here’s a pic of him working)…I’m sure the series will reappear on VII in the future, but for now we can enjoy an edit on Photo Booth…good news: it includes new frames, such as the below one,  shot this month…

Ashley Gilbertson: Occupy Wall Street (Photo Booth)

Nina Berman: Occupy Wall Street (NOOR)

Related to OWS issues I would say… Great series on American poverty by Joakim Eskildsen…

Joakim Eskildsen: Photographs of American Poverty (Lightbox)

From the other side of the American political spectrum…

Jason Andrew: Tea Party: Under the banners of American Flags  (Reportage)

DRC and elections…

Finbarr O’Reilly: Deadly Election Violence in Congo (Reuters)

Jonathan Torgovnik: Rebuilding DRC (Reportage)

Pierre Gonnord: Relatos (Lightbox)

Liz Hingley: Under Gods (Lightbox)

Gillian Laub: Turkey Day (Lightbox)

Paul Fusco: DGI  29 (Magnum in Motion)

Alixandra Fazzina: The Flowers of Afghanistan: First Sea (Photographer’s archive)

Pep Bonet: Microcredit Peru (NOOR)

Chloe Dewe Mathews: Caspian (Foto8)

Saw and edit of this feature run in Time mag couple of weeks ago..

Xavier Zimbardo: Reconstruction of the Bolshoi Theatre (Reportage) Behind the scenes video with Xavier Zimbardo in French

Best of the year….

photo: Goran Tomasevic

Reuters : Best Photos of the Year 2011

photo: Lynsey Addario

VII – Best of 2011: Highlights of a Year in News   : VII photographers present their best images, shot or released in 2011

AFP: 2011 Pictures of the Year

Fan of David Cameron or not,these Tom Stoddart photos in Reportage Tumblr are worth seeing.Cameron by Stoddart for Sunday Times Magazine….

Tom Stoddart: David Cameron (Reportage Tumblr)

Andrew McConnell’s Gaza surfing series on Newsweek…Bummed I still haven’t received the first issue of my annual subscription… Would have loved to have seen this in print…

Andrew McConnell: Surf’s Up in Gaza (Newsweek)

McConnell from Gaza also, but very different…NGO piece…

Andrew McConnell: Regenerating Gaza (Guardian)

Japan…

Giulio Di Sturco: Awash in Wrackage :  Japan (PDNPhotoaDay)

Kishin Shinoyama: After the Storm: Post-Tsunami Japan (Lightbox)

Donald Weber: Life After Zero Hour (VII) Japan

Davide Monteleone: Dusha: Russian Soul (VII)

Stefano di Luigi: Hidden China (VII)

Massimo Berruti: Lashkars in Pakistan (Lightbox) The series in Le Monde

Annie Leibovitz:  Pilgrimage (NYT)

Luceo Images: Few and Far Between (NYT Lens)

Joao Pina: Tracing the Shadows of Operation Condor (NYT Lens)

Andew Testa: Mind the Masterpiece (Panos)

Kacper Kowalski: Winter Photos from the Skies Above Poland (NYT Lens)

Jared Moossy: Mourning in Mogadishu (Foreign Policy)

Sebastian Liste: Urban Quilombo (Reportage)

Teun Voeten: Narco Estado (Magnum Emergency Fund)

Nick Cobbing: The Solid Sea (Photographer’s website)

Harvey Wang: A World of Change on the Lower East Side (NYT)

Robb Hill: Rural Home Town (NYT Lens)

Suzanne Opton: Soldier Down: Portraits (Lightbox)

Kirill Nikitenko: Russian Portraits of Defiance (Newsweek) Nikitenko’s website

Brian Van Der Brug: In Prison and Dying (LA Times Framework photo blog)

Lourdes Jeannette: Blood Ties (Lightbox)

Caged animals.

Asmita Parelkar: Not-So-Wild-Kingdom (NYT Lens)

Stuffed animals.

Klaus Pichler: Behind the Scenes Photos of Natural History (NYT Lens)

Guillaume Herbaut: The Zone (Project website) Now in English

Guillermo Arias: Tijuana River City (zReportage)

Kate Holt: The Real Cost of War (zReportage)

Natalie Naccache Mourad: Madaneh Marriages (photographer’s website)

Marc Lester: Living with Breast Cancer (Anchorage Daily News)

Oli Scarff: Winners at the Poultry Club’s 2011 national show (Guardian)

 Interviews and Talks


David Douglas Duncan (Lightbox)

Seamus Murphy (Verve Photo)

David Alan Harvey (Develop photo Vimeo)

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #6 (Phaidon)

Giles Duley : Becoming the Story (Economist)

Jason Larkin (Frontline club)

Alissa Everett : Giving up finance for photojournalism (CNN)

Sebastian Liste pt.1 / pt.2 (Daylight Magazine)

Marco Grob : How I Got That Shot: The 3-Minute Portrait (PDN)

Is this Annie Leibovitz and Fuji X100?

Annie Leibovitz (NPR)

Annie Leibovitz ♥’s Her iPhone Camera (PDN)

Jodi Bieber talks about the reaction to her World Press Photo winning photograph on The Strand (BBC)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (The Broad’s Sheet)

Useful advice by Rachel Palmer…

Rachel Palmer : How to get a photography commission for an NGO (photographer’s/photo editor’s website)

Kate Peters (IdeasTap)

Eric White (MSNBC photo blog)

Lisa Pritchard : Ask an Agent 5 (LPA blog)

Liz Hingley : Turning point (NYT Lens)

BagNewsSalon webinar, “The Visual Politics of Occupy Wall Street.” :  4 December

Videos

BBC: The ‘genius’ of Tim Hetherington killed in war

Articles 

Time magazine does it again….’dummying-up’ (I might have just made up that word) the US edition I mean… My mate Tim Fadek has the TIME cover this week with a terrific image from Cairo in all markets expect the US….

Peek inside…This is how Tim’s two other photos ran…

Comment…

Business Insider: These Time Magazine Covers Explain Why Americans Know Nothing About The World

PDN: Israel Apologizes to Lynsey Addario

Saw Lynsey Addario ( @lynseyaddario) tweet a link to this Marie Claire piece on female photojournalists…Featuring Addario herself, Agnes Dherbeys, Erin Trieb, Stephanie Sinclair, and Andrea Bruce

photo: Stephanie Sinclair

Marie Claire: Female Photojournalists | “Once thought of as too frail for the job, five award-winning women photojournalists share their most vivd memories from the field — and the images they will never forget.”

Related…

NYT: Arrests and Attacks on Women Covering Protests in Cairo 

NYT: Software to Rate How Dratically Photos Are Retouched

PDN: Inside the Bestseller List: Top Photo Books of 2011

NYT: Shooting for Global Change (NYT Lens)

I was in Istanbul over the weekend, but sadly had no time to check out any of these exhibitions…

photo: Bruno Barbey

NYT: A Whirling Document of Turkish Culture

PDN: Cartier-Bresson Photo Sets Record at Christie’s Auction in Paris

Yahoo: Camera lost at sea returned with the help of social networking

TimeOut: Photography galleries in London

Dvafoto: Find Copyright Violations of Your Pictures With src-img Bookmarklet

A Photo Editor: Real World Estimates – Flat Rate Magazine Contracts

BJP: Editorial photographers hit by latest Getty Images cuts

BJP: Photographer Jean-Christian Bourcart wins the 2011 Prix Nadar for his book Camden

BJP: Celebrated printer Gene Nocon dies

Joerg Colberg: What Photographs Can and Cannot Do (Conscientious)

Guardian: Jodi Bieber’s Best Shot

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist Tim Wimborne

Photoshelter Guide: Selling Stock Photography

Foto8: Book review – Ben Lowy: Iraq Perspectives

Related..

A Photo Editor: This Week In Photography Books

Looking into some  heavy duty camera ‘bags’… Saw Greg Funnell tweet this review he had done in 2008…

Greg Funnell: Gear Review : Think Tank Airport Security Vs Pelican Case 1510 (Photographer’s blog)

Verve Photo: Jake Price

Awards, Grants, and Competitions 

photo: Jan Grarup

Leica Oskar Barnack Award will be accepting entries from 16 January 

College Photographer of the Year : International picture story winning images & judges screencast are online

Rory Peck Awards Winners

FotoEvidence Book Award open for submissions

Photo Lucida Critical Mass 2011 Winners

FotoVisura Grant

LPA Student Challenges 

Crowd Funding

Emphas.is Crowdfunding photojournalism survey

Behind the smokescreen by Rocco Rorandelli (Emphas.is) featured on BJP

Grozny – Nine Cities by Kravets, Morina, Yushko (Emphas.is) project featured on NYT Lens in 2010

Agencies and Collectives

VII Newsletter

Panos Pictures newsletter

Statement Images submissions deadline extended

Jobs

Look3 : Exhibits Coordinator

Saw these on Twitter…

New Yorker : spring multimedia intern (students only) : Contact kristina_budelis[at]newyorker.com

Redux is in need of an intern in NYC office : Adobe Creative Suite skills is necessary:  send an email to submissions[at]reduxpictures.com with Internship in the subject line

Intern for Phaidon.com . Email features@phaidon.com with your CV

Desk Space

Roof Unit : London

Photographers 

Website relaunch…

Marcus Bleasdale

Benjamin Lowy : December 2011 Promo

Asmita Parelkar

Louis Quail

Caleb Ferguson

Marc Lester

Bruno Mancinelle

To finish off…

Very, very good Erroll Morris short… The Umbrella Man from NYT

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WARNING: SOME IMAGES CONTAIN GRAPHIC CONTENT OR NUDITY
From the uprisings across the Arab world to the devastating earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster in Japan, there was no lack of news in 2011. Reuters photographers covered the breaking news events as well as captured more intimate, personal stories. In this showcase, the photographers offer a behind the scenes account of the images that helped define the year.

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Interesting all these legends seem to be getting personal websites at the moment… Christopher Morris…Christopher Anderson…now Gary Knight… at least to my knowledge none of them had websites before…

PhotographersGary Knight

Features and Essays - Martin Parr: China Beaches (Magnum: October 2010)

Features and Essays – Peter van Agtmael: Scenes from a Midterm-Election Road Trip (TIME: October 2010)

Features and Essays - Platon: Burmese Refugees (New Yorker: October 2010)

Features and Essays - Michal Chelbin: The Black Eye (New Yorker: October 2010) Wrestlers after the fight

Features and Essays - Ed Kashi: Punjab (VII: October 2010) Pakistan

Features and Essays – Brian L Frank: Wind of Change in Havana (WSJ: October 2010)

Features and Essays – Noah Friedman-Rudovsky: Beneath Bolivia’s Salt Flats: Lithium Wealth (TIME: October 2010)

Features and Essays - Verso Images: Grozny – A Tale of Many Cities (NYT Lens: October 2010)

Collectives - Verso Images

Elliott Erwitt’s ‘Platinum prints and Classic Snaps @ Magnum Print Room,London….I saw them a couple of weeks ago…It was great to see some of his classics printed …Including a huge print of this…the price tag was something like £13k if  I remember correctly…

InterviewsElliott Erwitt (Telegraph: October 2010)

More on the Larry Clark exhibition in Paris…

Articles - Guardian: Outcry as Paris bans under 18s from Larry Clark exhibition (Guardian: October 2010)

InterviewsIan Teh (Invisible Photographer: October 2010)

ExhibitionsStefano de Luigi: Blanco : 10B Photography gallery : Rome : 15 October – 30 November 2010

My friend Gianmarco Maraviglia, who runs the Parallelozero agency in Milan, got in touch about their new photographer Marco Gualazzini…Check out couple of his features…

Laos – Lao Pop Culture (Parallelozero: 2010)

Indians and the Parmesan Cheese (Parallelozero: 2010)

Wendy Marijnissen has some new work from Pakistan  in her archive…

Rabia’s First (Photographer’s PhotoShelter archive: 2010)

‘Everything gone’ – The Jamshoro drama (Photographer’s PhotoShelter Archive: 2010)

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