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On October 30, 1974 in Kinshasa, Zaire, now known as the Democratic Republic of Congo, Muhammad Ali, faced George Foreman for the title of world heavyweight champion. Abbas’ photos of the fight are a document of a fight frozen in time, in black-and-white stills—the fight that cemented Muhammad Ali’s reputation as “The Greatest.”

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Rebecca Flaig of Goochland, Va., left, and Ryan Jung of Richmond hold their umbrellas aloft as part of the World AIDS Day event on Brown’s Island in Richmond, Va. on Thursday, Dec. 1, 2011. A sea of red umbrellas, in the form of a giant red ribbon, were displayed. A man holds a poster featuring [...]

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Hours after violent clashes between masses of protesters and police, Egyptians swarmed the polls early this week for the beginning rounds of parliamentary elections. They are the first elections since a prodemocracy uprising ousted longtime president Hosni Mubarak from office earlier this year. The poll stations have been remarkably peaceful, despite the simmering anger over the military’s extended role in running the government. In contrast, the Democratic Republic of Congo's presidential and legislative elections this week were beset by fraud, some observers say. In one town, rebel fighters attacked a polling place, killing at least five people and burning ballots. The voting was Congo's second since the end of the country's last war and the first organized by the government rather than the international community. -- Lloyd Young
(30 photos total)
A man waits outside a polling station to cast his vote during parliamentary elections in Cairo Nov. 28. (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters)

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CONGO CHAOS
CONGO CHAOS: An opposition supporter displayed what he said were fraudulent copies of election ballots in Kinshasa, Congo, Monday. Voting materials failed to arrive in some areas and several people have been killed in conflicts. More than 18,000 candidates are competing for 500 parliamentary seats. (Jerome Delay/Associated Press)

SPEAKING FRANKLY
SPEAKING FRANKLY: Rep. Barney Frank announced Monday in Newton, Mass., that he will not seek re-election for a 17th term. Mr. Frank, 71 years old, is the top Democrat on the House Financial Services Committee. (Adam Hunger/Reuters)

MIC CHECK
MIC CHECK: Graduate student Anthony Trochez yelled ‘mic check,’ a phrase that has been used at Occupy protests, three times during a University of California Board of Regents meeting at the University of California, Los Angeles Monday. Students angry about budget cuts and Occupy crackdowns spoke out. (Reed Saxon/Associated Press)

THE MANNEQUIN AND THE SEA
THE MANNEQUIN AND THE SEA: A mannequin dressed as a fisherman in a Santa Claus costume sat on a rocky outcrop in the Irish Sea near Belfast Monday. (Cathal McNaughton/Reuters)

BRICK BOY
BRICK BOY: Abdulghaffar Khamees, 12 years old, sat on a pile of bricks during his break at a factory on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Monday. (Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press)

PITCHING A FIT
PITCHING A FIT: Protesters held pitchforks and spades during a rally in front of a city administration building in Donetsk, Ukraine, Monday. They protested against increasing communal tariffs. (Alexander Khudoteply/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

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Colin Delfosse was in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) documenting conditions in copper mines when, returning to Kinshasa one evening, he saw a masked man perched atop a car, leading a procession of drummers and several dozen men and children.

Intrigued, the Belgian photographer began asking around and learned that what he had witnessed was the afternoon build-up to one of the city’s most popular sports: wrestling. In a country that, from 1998 to 2003, was the center of one of the bloodiest conflicts since World War II—8.4 million people killed from eight countries—one wouldn’t expect to find crowds clamoring to watch men pretend to beat each other up, Hulk Hogan-style. But influenced by broadcasts of American wrestling in the 1970s, the Congolese adapted the sport, bringing their own spin—parades, voo-doo and body paint. The sport is so firmly entrenched that even the president’s body guard is a popular wrestler, known as “Etats-Unis,” and one of Kinshasa’s district mayors even sponsored a match to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the country’s independence from Belgium.

In the DRC, there are two branches of the sport. The first is the more recognizable WWE SmackDown-brand, villain vs. villain match, where wrestlers craft costumes out of spandex, wear masks and choreograph a physical tussle. The second, called fetish wrestling, involves opponents, wearing antelope horns or fake machetes through their skull, dancing, casting spells and using witchcraft to combat each other.

“The classic wrestlers consider themselves more important,” says Delfosse, of the group who have day jobs as taxi drivers or bouncers. “They train hard, lifting weights every day. The fetish wrestlers have more of a rock’n’ roll lifestyle—they sit around, drinking beer and smoking weed.”

Gaining his subjects’ cooperation took a while; it was months before Delfosse was able to ride with wrestlers to and from the matches (protection he was relieved to get, as in the early days he was roughed up coming home from a match in a dangerous neighborhood and his cameras smashed). But even with that access, photography is viewed with suspicion, and getting portraits of the wrestlers often took a few hours of negotiation. “They always think you’re going to earn millions from the photo. They’re reluctant and they want to be paid. So you drink a beer with them, and tell them no, you’re not going to get rich,” said Delfosse. “Sometimes four hours later, I can take their picture. You have to be patient.”

Working inside the wrestling scene changed Delfosse’s feelings about Kinshasa. He admitted he hated the noisy, chaotic capital—considered one of the most dangerous in Africa, with a homicide rate almost six times greater than the continent as a whole—when he arrived. While the violence that still pervades the society is just below the surface of the matches—Human Rights Watch documented a mass rape, abduction and torture in a couple of eastern villages just last year—the sport showed Delfosse a different side of the Congolese. “They’re surviving day-to-day. There are no jobs, no infrastructure. When they wake up they don’t know what they’re going to eat for dinner that night,” he said. “It’s hard and tough, but this is a way to show they kept their sense of humor.”

Colin Delfosse is a documentary photographer and a founding member of Out of Focus photography collective. See more of his work here

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When dictators are overthrown by rebel or military forces, their many elaborate palaces, mansions and bunkers are evacuated, left behind for the new forces to rummage through.

From Saddam Hussein’s palace, Maqar-el-Tharthar, a massive residence at Lake Tharthar, to Moamer Kadhafi’s homes and his families homes scattered throughout Libya, the first peek into their lavish lifestyles come to life as rebels enter each residence.

 The Palaces Left Behind

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American soldiers patrolled inside a palace which belonged to Uday Hussein in Baghdad, Thursday, April 10, 2003. The palace was heavily bomed by coalition airpower. (Tyler Hicks/The New York Times) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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Soldiers and civilians occupy the office of ousted Romanian Leader Ceaucescu in the Central Committee headquarters 26 December 1989 in Bucharest. Nicolae Ceaucescu and his wife Elena has been executed 25 December 1989. (Photo credit should read PATRICK HERTZOG/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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Anti-Communist soldier (L) sticks a bayonet through a portrait of late Romanian Communist leader Nicolae Ceausescu 28 December 1989 in Sibiu as the anti-Communist uprising to end Nicolae Ceausescu's 24 years of dictatorial rule continue. The communist dictator N. Ceausescu and his wife Elena were deposed and executed by a firing squad 25 December 1989. Eight years after the December 1989 revolution which toppled Ceausescu, Romania has begun lifting the veil on the "mysteries" surrounding the uprising and the circumstances which brought former president Ion Iliescu to power. According to general prosecutor Sorin Moisescu, reports put about at the time of "terrorists loyal to Ceausescu" provoking bloody diversions to sow panic in the population, were "fabricated" to justify Iliescu's takeover. "Nothing that happened after 22 December 1989 was due to chance. The deaths of some of the demonstrators were supposed to provide legitimacy to the new regime" Moisecu said 24 December 1998. (Photo credit should read MICHEL GANGNE/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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An inside view of the Saddam Hussein's palace, Maqar-el-Tharthar is seen on June 11, 2003 at Lake Tharthar, Iraq. Saddam celebrated his birthday in 1999 by building Maqar-el-Tharthar, the so-called "Green Palace" which is the biggest and most elaborate of President Saddam's palaces. It covers two and a half square miles and consists of a Presidential and VIP residential compounds; it is the second only to the President's Tikrit residence in overall size. The complex was not bombed by Coalition forces but has been completely looted afterwards by Iraqis. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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An Iraqi woman and her daughter cross a smoke filled intersection with looted tables April 11, 2003 in downtown Baghdad, Iraq. Widespread looting of both government buildings and private businesses is rampant across Baghdad following the collapse of local authority after coalition forces took the city. (Photo by Scott Nelson/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A US soldier sits in a seat at the Radwaniyah Palace used during the toppled regime of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein as a reception palace for guests near Baghdad's international airport 25 June 2003. The international press was taken on a tour of the palaces by the US military, three months after the fall of Baghdad. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A journalist films inside one of the main reception rooms of toppled leader Saddam Hussein's 'Peace Palace' or 'Qasr al-Salam' in Baghdad 25 June 2003. The international press was taken on a tour of the palaces by the US military, three months after the fall of Baghdad. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A US soldier sits on the stairs at the entrance of toppled Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's damaged 'Peace Palace' or 'Qasr al-Salam' in Baghdad 25 June 2003. The international press was taken on a tour of the palaces by the US military, three months after the fall of Baghdad. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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U.S. Army Specialist Ureses Zamora, from Las Vegas, Nevada, of the 4th Infantry Division, usues a laptop in a former palace of Saddam Hussein November 12, 2003 in a former Saddam Hussein palace in Tikrit, Iraq. The soldiers are living in relative comfort as they continue to pursue the enemy in Saddam Hussein's hometown. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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CAMP VICTORY, IRAQ - JULY 1: Soldiers stand at attention during a change of command ceremony July 1, 2004 in Camp Victory, Iraq. Gen. Casey took command of the forces from Gen. Sanchez in a change of command ceremony at the elaborate Al-Faw Palace in Camp Victory. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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** FILE ** U.S. Army soldiers Spc. Daniel Andrews of Lynchburg, Va., left, and Pvt. Robert Knott of Fort Hood, Tex., both from Alfa Company-588 swim in an indoor pool at one of ousted Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's palaces, now a U.S. Army base, in Tikrit, Iraq, Monday Sept. 1, 2003. U.S. soldiers stationed here in this riverside palace complex that once belonged to Saddam Hussein face constant danger from Iraqi insurgents whenever they leave the base. But once inside, they are getting to kick back inincreasing style. (AP Photo/Murad Sezer) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A US Army soldier from the 1-22 Battalion of the 4th Infantry Division (Task Force Ironhorse) shoots the ball during a basketball game inside one of ousted Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's former palaces along the banks of the Tigris river in Tikrit, 180km (110 miles) north of Baghdad, 23 November 2003. With their marble interiors, domed roofs and intricate arabesque stucco, the headquarters of the 4th ID look more like a vision from a Middle Eastern fairy tale than a military camp. The resort-like series of palaces now called Forward Base Ironhorse used to be a favorite resting place of Saddam before US-led coalition forces ousted him in April. AFP PHOTO/Mauricio LIMA (Photo credit should read MAURICIO LIMA/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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TACLOBAN, PHILIPPINES: Visitors view the bedroom of Imelda Marcos at the Santo Nino shrine 13 October 2004 that was sequestered by the government. When the former first lady built the mansion in 1981 in her hometown Tacloban, it was dubbed by many as the Malacanang presidential palace of the south. The mansion named after religious icon of the Child Jesus stands as a monument to the obscene excesses of the Marcos years whenthe late dictator Ferdinand Marcos was deposed by military-backed people power revolt in 1986 after 20 years in power. AFP PHOTO ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images) #

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TACLOBAN, PHILIPPINES: The bathroom with jacuzzi of the former first lady Imelda Marcos at the Santo Nino shrine 13 October 2004 that was sequestered by the government. When Imelda built the mansion in 1981 in her hometown Tacloban, it was dubbed by many as the Malacanang presidential palace of the south. The mansion named after religious icon of the Child Jesus stands as a monument to the obscene excesses of the Marcos years when the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos was deposed in 1986 by a military-backed people power revolt after 20 years in power. AFP PHOTO ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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BAGHDAD, Iraq: Iraqi soldiers gestures to a giant mural of ousted Iraqi Dictator Saddam Hussein still hanging in of his former palaces in Baghdad's heavily fortified Green Zone in this image taken 19 October 2005. Once a Pan Arab champion, Saddam the feared Iraqi leader will go on trial 28 November 2005 on charges linked to the killing of 148 Shiite villagers. AFP PHOTO/KARIM SAHIB (Photo credit should read KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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HILLAH, IRAQ, APRIL 21: A worker makes a bed inside a marbled room where Saddam supposedly once slept, at one of the former dictator 's palace villas, which can be rented for about USD170 a night on April 21, 2009 in the city of Hillah in Babil province about 50 miles south of Baghdad, Iraq. The Palace, which is adjacent to the remains of the ancient city of Babylon, was purged of anything of value by looters as Saddam's regime fell in April 2003 and then occupied by US and coalition forces until late 2006. The palace was opened to public who can visit it for about 85 US cents. Some of its surrounded villas have been converted into hotel rooms. (Photo by Muhannad Fala'ah/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A looter carries away a chair inside Saddam Hussein's main palace in Baghdad 12 April, 2003. Looting has plagued Baghdad and other Iraqi cities since US forces won control of the capital 09 April. Hundreds of Iraqis, including police officers, answered 12 April an urgent US appeal to help restore order and services to Baghdad after an orgy of looting followed weeks of heavy coalition bombardment. AFP PHOTO ODD ANDERSEN (Photo credit should read ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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US Army Sergeant Craig Zentkovich from Connecticut belonging to the 1st Brigade Combat Team photographs a pink bedroom at Saddam Hussein's presidential palace 13 April 2003. The palace is located in a vast military compound near the airport southwest of the capital. AFP PHOTO/Romeo GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A US marine walks inside the presidential palace in Port-Au-Prince 09 March 2004. Troops from France, the US and Chile have poured into the country in an effort to stabilize the country after former Haitian president Jean Bertrand Aristide fled the country 29 February 2004. AFP PHOTO/Jaime RAZURI (Photo credit should read JAIME RAZURI/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A soldier of the rebel Alliance of Laurent-Desire Kabila, surrounded by looters, uses his weapon to hit a photograph of ousted Zairean President Mobutu Sese Seko 20 May 1997 in the house the former leader kept at the Tshatshi military camp in Kinshasa. In October 1996, Zairean opposition leader Laurent Desire Kabila, as head of the newly formed Alliance of Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Congo-Zaire, rallied forces consisting mostly of Tutsi from eastern Zaire and launched a full-scale rebellion against Mobutu, forcing him to flee the country, following failed peace talks in May 1997. On 17 May 1997, Kabila installed himself as head of state after his troops took control of Kinshasa and renamed the country the Democratic Republic of Congo. (Photo credit should read PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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Afghan youth play football in front of the ruins of the Darul Aman Palace in Kabul on December 3, 2010. Afghan government officials hit back at "stupid" allegations made in leaked US diplomatic cables about corruption but refused to comment on a damning assessment of President Hamid Karzai. Deputy presidential spokesman Hamed Elmi downplayed documents released by Internet whistleblower WikiLeaks as "not much new," with "nothing substantive to negatively affect our good relations with the international community". AFP PHOTO/Massoud HOSSAINI (Photo credit should read MASSOUD HOSSAINI/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A child stands in a room of the former palace of late dictator Mobutu Sese Seko, in Gbadolite, on November 24, 2010. Mobutu built two private residences and an official presidential palace among other buildings in Gbadolite and Kawele. Mobutu came to power in a 1965 coup, five years after the central African nation gained independence from Belgium. He ruled Zaire for 32 years, plunging the country into a long economic crisis marked by state corruption, the embezzlement of funds and excessive luxuries. AFP PHOTO / GWENN DUBOURTHOUMIEU (Photo credit should read Gwenn Dubourthoumieu/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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Tunisian workers remove on January 17, 2011 portraits of ousted President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali from the prime minister's office in Tunis. Tunisian protesters on January 17 called for the abolition of Ben Ali's ruling party amid a chaotic power vacuum as politicians prepared a government of national unity. The Moroccan press welcomed on January 17 the fall of Ben Ali after weeks of street protests, and said it was a lesson for north Africa and the Arab world. AFP PHOTO / FETHI BELAID (Photo credit should read FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A Libyan rebel stands inside the front door of a luxurious complex that rebels and local residents claim to be the holiday home of the Kadhafi family in Ain Zara close to Tripoli, on August 31, 2011. Numerous luxury buildings have been discovered by rebels as they get increased access to areas after the ouster of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi and his loyalist forces. AFP PHOTO/CARL DE SOUZA (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A general shot shows the gardens of a luxurious complex that rebels and local residents claim to be the holiday home of the Kadhafi family in Ain Zara close to Tripoli, on August 31, 2011. Numerous luxury buildings have been discovered by Libyan rebels as they get increased access to areas after ousted Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi and his loyalist forces were forced to abandon their residences. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A general view shows a luxurious complex that rebels and local residents claim to be the holiday home of the Kadhafi family in Ain Zara close to Tripoli, on August 31, 2011. Numerous luxury buildings have been discovered by rebels as they get increased access to areas after the ouster of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi and his loyalist forces. AFP PHOTO/CARL DE SOUZA (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A Libyan rebel walks past a swimming pool outside the mansion of Motassem Kadhafi, a son of Libya's embattled leader, in Tripoli on August 30, 2011. Libya's rebels issued an ultimatum for Moamer Kadhafi's forces to surrender or face a military onslaught, as NATO said the strongman is still able to command his troops despite being on the run. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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Libyan rebels inspect the mansion of Motassem Kadhafi, a son of Libya's embattled leader, in Tripoli on August 30, 2011. Libya's rebels issued an ultimatum for Moamer Kadhafi's forces to surrender or face a military onslaught, as NATO said the strongman is still able to command his troops despite being on the run. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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Libyan rebels inspect an empty swimming pool at the mansion of Motassem Kadhafi, a son of Libya's embattled leader, in Tripoli on August 30, 2011. Libya's rebels issued an ultimatum for Moamer Kadhafi's forces to surrender or face a military onslaught, as NATO said the strongman is still able to command his troops despite being on the run. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A Libyan rebel poses for a souvenir picture outside the mansion of Motassem Kadhafi, a son of Libya's embattled leader, in Tripoli on August 30, 2011. Libya's rebels issued an ultimatum for Moamer Kadhafi's forces to surrender or face a military onslaught, as NATO said the strongman is still able to command his troops despite being on the run. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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Former Abu Slim prisoner, Sami Sadiq Abu Ruwais, stands next to a swimming pool inside a luxurious complex that rebels and local residents claim to be the holiday home of the Kadhafi family in Ain Zara close to Tripoli, on August 31, 2011. Numerous luxury buildings have been discovered by rebels as they get increased access to areas after the ouster of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi and his loyalist forces. AFP PHOTO/CARL DE SOUZA (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A Libyan rebel inspects an underground network of bunkers under the mansion of Motassem Kadhafi, a son of Libya's embattled leader, in Tripoli on August 30, 2011. Libya's rebels issued an ultimatum for Moamer Kadhafi's forces to surrender or face a military onslaught, as NATO said the strongman is still able to command his troops despite being on the run. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Erupting volcanoes, drug wars, famine in Niger, aftermath of the Haiti earthquake, children suffering from Agent Orange disabilities, abortions performed by untrained practitioners in Kenya but also lucha libre for women, traveling cinema in India and couchsurfing in Brooklyn continue

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I left Beirut midnight on Saturday and didn’t arrive to Helsinki until midday Sunday, so was way too tired to start doing blog updates yesterday. Besides, wanted to see some friends. But here is June’s fourth instalment of Photojournalism Links…

Features and Essays

Based on Facebook updates and hearing from friends it seems several photographers who were working in Libya in in March/April, are heading back there  this week…I wish them safe travels…looking forward to seeing their work….Feels like a second wave of coverage is coming…Rather fitting since International Criminal Court just issued an arrest warrant for Gaddafi..

Some of Moises Saman’s recent work from Tripoli on Magnum site… Includes black and white versions of some of the frames in last week’s NYT slideshow…

Moises Saman: NATO Campaign Against Gaddafi Regime (Magnum: June 2011)

Related to Libya conflict…

Alex Majoli: Dark Passage (Newsweek: June 2011) Arab Refugees Flow Into Europe

Ivor Prickett is one of the photographers heading back to Libya…Here is his beautiful Abkhazia work on Panos Pictures site, in case you missed it…

Ivor Prickett: Gali, Abkhazia – Left in Limbo (Panos: June 2011)

Finbarr O’Reilly: Shocking Clashes in Senegal (TIME: June 2011)

Sean Gallagher shot his first assignment for Newsweek…I’m sure there’ll be plenty more in the future…

Sean Gallagher: Next to the North Korean Border (Newsweek: June 2011)

Chad Ress: America Recovered (TIME LB: June 2011)

Danielle Levitt : The Kids are Alright: High Schoolers (TIME LB: June 2011)

Angelos Tzortzinis: Panic on the Streets of Athens (TIME LB: June 2011)

Conny Luhulima and Geert van Kesteren: Nunusaku (Foto8: June 2011)

Kacper Kowalski: Toxic Beauty (Panos: June 2011)

Leica released their M9-P… Alex Majoli did some work with the camera in Venice…

Alex Majoli: Venice (Leica-camera.com: June 2011)

Mishka Henner: In a Foreign Field (Panos: June 2011)

Dhruv Malhotra: Sleepers (TIME LB: June 2011)

Ashley Gilbertson: Ready to Eat (VII Mag: June 2011)

Susan Anderson: Beauty Speaks: Portraits of 31 Former Miss USA Pageant Queen (TIME LB: June 2011)

Heidi Warner: The Disappearance of the Borscht Belt Hotels (TIME LB: June 2011)

Maria Gruzdeva: Direction, Space! (Foto8: June 2011)

Interviews

Lynsey Addario (Marie Claire: June 2011)

Sebastian Meyer : Photographing Libya’s Violent Conflict (BBC: June 2011)

Lauren Greenfield (Stockland Martel blog: June 2011)

Was reading the National Geographic Magazine’s July issue during my travel yesterday…Great to see Addario’s Baghdad work in print, the one I was praising in last week’s post… The issue includes also some of Michael Christopher Brown’s Libya Hipstas..Empas.is did an interview with him…

Michael Christopher Brown : Going beyond the frontline: Michael C. Brown returns to Libya (Emphas.is: June 2011)

Todd Heisler : A Father’s Voice, Through Kodachrome (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Janine di Giovanni : ‘I believed I had escaped trauma… but I was not as unbroken as I thought’  (Guardian: June 2011) War correspondent Janine di Giovanni saw death and trauma on a scale unimaginable to most of us. She thought she was immune to fear. But, as her compelling memoir reveals, when she and her husband finally put war behind them to start a family, the past came back to shatter their lives…

Alex Majoli (Leica-camera.com: June 2011)

Sean Gallagher (1416.me: June 2011)

Ed Kashi (Youtube)

Karim Ben Khelifa (takepart.com: June 2011) ”The World is Changing, Change With It”

Laura El Tantawy (Sojournposse: June 2011)

Tim and Noah Hussin (Thedigitalnaturalist.com: June 2011) Tim and Noah Hussin about their documentary journey called America ReCycled

Andrew Burton (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Articles

NPPA: History Is Made: Press Photographer Covers Live Presidential Speech (NPPA: June 2011)

! BJP: Street photography subject of second Firecracker event (BJP: June 2011)

photo: Gona Aziz

TIME LB: Iraq Through Iraqi Eyes (TIME LB: June 2011)

TIME LB: Facing Change Collective and the Library of Congress to Cooperate (TIME LB: June 2011)

Bill Kramer: Real World Estimates – Magazine Contract (A Photo Editor: June 2011)

BJP: The future of photography? Kadir van Lohuizen’s launches an iPad app of his journey up the Pan-American Highway (BJP: June 2011)

David Campbell: Debating ‘Who’s afraid of home?’, and the importance of narrative (DC Blog: June 2011)

Jeremy Nicholl: “Jay Maisel Is A Dick”: Freetard Mob Savages Octogenarian Photographer Over Copyright (Photographer’s blog: June 2011)

Jeremy Nicholl: 10 Reasons This Isn’t The Greatest Photo Ever (Photographer’s blog: June 2011)

Leica camera: M9-P in Venice: The Making of (Vimeo) Magnum photographer Alex Majoli took the new Leica M9-P on a journey through Venice. Alex Majoli accompanied one of the around 700 gondolieri for several days and captured a sensitive portrait of the gondolier and his city. Here is a behind the scenes view of Alex’s journey through Venice.

Travel Photographers: Upgrade To The New Leica M9-P For Just $0.25 (TP: June 2011)

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Luis Robayo (Guardian: June 2011) Luis Robayo is an Agence France-Presse photographer based in Colombia. In this set of photographs he documents Brother Hermes, an exorcist in the Valle del Cauca

Allthingsd.com: Meet the Stealthy Start-Up That Aims to Sharpen Focus of Entire Camera Industry (allthingsd.com: June 2011)

NYT: In Hours, Online Readers Identify Nazi Photographer (NYT: June 2011)

PDN: Benefiting from Portfolio Reviews: How To Stay In Touch (PDN: June 2011)

Telegraph: Photography Sites of the Week (Telegraph: June 2011)

Guardian Eyewitness: Andrew McConnell: Kinshasa strings (Guardian: June 2011) Photographs from the Guardian Eyewitness series

PhotoShelter Guide: The Photographer’s guide to selling like a pro (PS: June 2011)

Lisa Pritchard: Ask an Agent (LPA blog: June 2011)

Absolutely must see! Congratulations to Panos Pictures for their 25th anniversary!

Videos – Panos Pictures: Conversations in Photography: 25 years of Panos Pictures (Panos: June 2011)

Developing Pictures blog: Panos 25 Years (Developing pictures blog: June 2011)

Crowd funding – Erin Trieb : The Homecoming Project (Kickstarter)

PhotographersFabio Bucciarelli

ServicesMetro Print

AgenciesMagnum Photos AGM decisions from BJP

EventsFoto8 Summershow 2011 Launch Party : 8 July : London : £10/£15

Awards

Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize : Deadline 7 July

photo: Alex Masi

Getty Images announces Grants for Good winners (BJP: June 2011) Photographers Alex Masi and Gwenn Dubourthoumieu have won this year’s Grants for Good, which will see them receive $15,000 each for the production of new imagery to support non-profit organisations of their choosing | Same from PDN

The France 24-RFI Web Documentary Award (BJP: June 2011)

Jing Huang – winner of the Leica Oskar Barnack Newcomer Award for his portfolio ‘Pure of Sight’

TwitterKevin van Paassen

TwitterDEVELOP Photo

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Matteo Bittanti and Domenico Quaranta, the authors of the very enjoyable and clever book GameScenes. Art in the Age of Videogames, are onto great game art adventures again. This time, they curated an exhibition that celebrates the work of Italian artists who have been experimenting with game-based technologies for more than two decades continue

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