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Having recently graduated from her MA at London College of Communicatons, photographer Bronia Stewart’s first exhibition as part of Fresh Faced and Wild Eyed at The Photographers’ Gallery documents the nine months she spent shooting adult television channel and phone sex-line workers at London-based Babestation.

Her images might be NSFW, but don’t mistake the nudity in them for grubby, voyeuristic lust; themes of aspiration and ambition underpin Bronia’s photography, as she focuses on the positive and sociable atmosphere behind the scenes in the studio. She somehow manages to portray the relationships between the women and the producers they work with as affectionate, playful and very much unthreatening, while simultaneously nudging her viewer into a debate about how the media encourages the sexualisation of women, in order to get ahead in a male-dominated work environment. A very brilliant first instalment indeed.

Fresh Faced and Wild Eyed runs at The Photographers’ Gallery until July 21

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After a string of strong supporting roles, Jude Law returns to the spotlight in Dom Hemingway. And what a noisy, colorful return it may be.

The gangster pic stars Law as a safecracker who’s just spent twelve years in prison for keeping his mouth shut. Once out, he reconnects with his old life by trying to collect his due from his boss (Demián Bichir) and make up with his estranged daughter (Emilia Clarke). Richard E. Grant plays Dom’s best friend, who’s along for the ride.

The first trailer has just hit, and you can check it out after the jump. Be warned that it’s NSFW, unless your own boss doesn’t mind seeing Law’s bare bottom on your computer screen.


[Digital Spy]

Law’s return to center stage comes not a moment too soon. He seems to be at the top of his form here, oozing charisma even as it becomes obvious that Dom is a terminal screw-up.

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Publisher Verso writes: It is assumed that every inch of the world has been explored and charted; that there is nowhere new to go. But perhaps it is the everyday places around us--the cities we live in--that need to be rediscovered. What does it feel like to find the city's edge, to explore its forgotten tunnels and scale unfinished skyscrapers high above the metropolis? Explore Everything reclaims the city, recasting it as a place for endless adventure.

Plotting expeditions from London, Paris, Berlin, Detroit, Chicago, Las Vegas and Los Angeles, Bradley L. Garrett has evaded urban security in order to experience the city in ways beyond the boundaries of conventional life. He calls it 'place hacking': the recoding of closed, secret, hidden and forgotten urban space to make them realms of opportunity.

Explore Everything is an account of the author's escapades with the London Consolidation Crew, an urban exploration collective.

The book is also a manifesto, combining philosophy, politics and adventure, on our rights to the city and how to understand the twenty-first century metropolis.

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It was March 2nd, 2011, and I was fifteen-years old. I was in the clouds. My font family, Expletus Sans, had just gone live on the Google Webfonts Directory (now simply called Google Fonts). Plenty of positive feedback and a generous reward from Google had made me expect a lot of it. But it didn’t take very long before I started laughing at the high regard I once had for Expletus Sans, and its silly name. The elegance I once saw in it was soon mixed with a decent dose of clumsiness and amateurism. However, Expletus Sans did provide me with the motivation and opportunity to invest in my skills, and keep designing typefaces.

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Visionaries: Factory Fifteen

Radical animation-architecture studio Factory Fifteen present a series of films depicting very different futureworlds

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