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A picture of Chantal Ughi, a Muay Thai boxer who is the subject of a photoessay by Giulio di Sturco. Giulio, a Reportage contributor, won a gold medal in the sports category of the Prix de la Photographie, Paris (Px3) for this work. Of his subject he writes:

From the East Village of Manhattan to Bangkok, a career in the underground cinema to the Thai boxing ring. It’s the story of Chantal Ughi, angel face with a background in fashion and now world champion muay thai, a sport she was struck by when she saw for the first time a fight in a gym in New York. After seven years in the Big Apple with different experiences in the music, art , fashion, and movies, Chantal dropped everything to attend a course of martial arts. She was supposed to stay in Bangkok for four weeks. Four years later, at the price of enormous sacrifices and strict self-discipline, she can say that her dream has come true.

Px3 also awarded Giulio an honorable mention for his work on violence related to the cocoa bean industry in Madagascar. See some of that work here. Giulio is based in Bangkok, Thailand, and his work has appeared in publications such as Time Magazine, Vanity Fair, L’espresso and more. View more of his work on the Reportage Web site.

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Millions of people from Maine to the Carolinas awoke Tuesday without power, and an eerily quiet New York City was all but closed off by car, train and air as superstorm Hurricane Sandy steamed inland, still delivering punishing wind and rain. The full extent of the damage in New Jersey, where the storm roared ashore [...]

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A game of hopscotch. A toothpaste ad. Filthy slums. This, for better or worse, was New York life in the 1930s. Many looked but few saw until the Photo League—a pioneering group of young, idealistic documentary photographers—captured that life with cameras.

The Manhattan-based League, which incorporated a school, darkroom, gallery and salon, was the first institution of its kind when it was founded in 1936 says Mason Klein, curator of fine arts at The Jewish Museum, which is currently presenting “The Radical Camera,” an exhibition in collaboration with the Columbus Museum of Art in Ohio. “There was nothing like the Photo League, where people could exhibit their work, students alongside their mentors, be taught a kind of history of photography and start understanding what the meaning of the photograph might be.”

Many of its founding members, including Sid Grossman, Sol Libsohn and Aaron Siskind, were first-generation Jewish immigrants with progressive, left-wing sensibilities. “They were very conscious of neighborhoods and communities,” says Klein. “I think it was very natural for Jews to form an egalitarian group and understand that the ordinary citizen of the urban scene was as much a valid subject as any for photography.”

The League thrived for fifteen years, generating projects like the Harlem Document, a collaborative effort by ten photographers to document the living conditions in poor black neighborhoods. It also fostered the careers of notable photographers such as Lisette Model, Weegee and Rosalie Gwathmey.

Despite its progressive agenda, the League’s mission was far from simplistic. Founder Grossman, who was just 23 when the group started, encouraged its members to look beyond documentary and question their relationship with the image. “Sid taught people to challenge their habitual ways of seeing the world,” says Klein. “A more poetic and metaphoric expression of how one saw the world was what Sid wanted from his students.” Under Grossman’s guidance, the League’s young muckrakers became artists.

By the 1940s, the League had turned away from its narrow political focus, capturing the squalor and splendor of everyday New York. The country was moving in the other direction, however, zeroing in on those suspected of harboring leftist sympathies. On December 5, 1947, the U.S. Attorney General blacklisted the League as “totalitarian, fascist, communist or subversive.” In 1951, it closed its doors forever.

The League’s reputation has never truly recovered, says Klein. “They were condemned to a kind of ideological shelving and, I think, unfairly treated by history. We’re trying to rectify that with this show, because they really were always about pushing the photograph and understanding it as art.”

The Radical Camera is on display at The Jewish Museum in New York through March 25. 

Sonia van Gilder Cooke is a reporter in TIME’s London Bureau. Follow her on Twitter at @svangildercooke.

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More than 20,000 photographs, from over 130 countries were submitted to the National Geographic Photography contest, with both professional photographers and amateur photo enthusiasts participating. The grand prize winner was chosen from the three category winners: Nature - Shikhei Goh, People - Izabelle Nordfjell, Places - George Tapan. Shikhei Goh, of Indonesia, took the grand prize honors with his amazing photograph of a dragonfly in the rain and will be published in the magazine. The competition was judged on creativity and photographic quality by a panel of experts composed of field biologist and wildlife photojournalist Tim Laman, National Geographic photographer Amy Toensing and National Geographic nature photographer Peter Essick. The winning submissions can be viewed at http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/photo-contest/ - Paula Nelson (14 photos total)
Grand Prize Winner and Nature Winner - SPLASHING: This photo was taken when I was taking photos of other insects, as I normally did during macro photo hunting. I wasn’t actually aware of this dragonfly since I was occupied with other objects. When I was about to take a picture of it, it suddenly rained, but the lighting was just superb. I decided to take the shot regardless of the rain. The result caused me to be overjoyed, and I hope it pleases viewers. Batam, Riau Islands, Indonesia (Photo and caption by Shikhei Goh)

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Miss Favela bar scene in Brooklyn, NY. Photo by Isabela Eseverri  – One light off camera

Rooftop party in Manhattan, NY. Photo by Madeleine Stevens – One light on camera

 

We  just did a one day small strobe lighting class in my loft in NY where I will be spending the next two weeks guiding photographers into  taking their personal next step. Both Madeleine and Isabela were out in the Saturday night scene practicing as seen above what they had learned from us during the day. I encourage photographers to “get personal” so even a one day tech class like this one becomes after all an exploration in doing work that is somehow a mirror of individual predilections.

The students who are here for a week, will take this process much further and show their work on this Friday evening at the loft in front of a cast of the best and brightest in photoland and let off by shows by both Chris Anderson and Bruce Gilden.

I will post work from time to time this week from this essay class. Stay tuned. You will see some very nice work shot right now by these very serious photographers.

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One of the most indelible memories in the collective psyche of Americans - and the world - comes from the images of the World Trade Center following the terrorist attacks on the United States, September 11, 2001. Yesterday, Americans and the world collectively remembered those who lost their lives in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania ten years after that unforgettable day. This post (edited by Leanne Burden) shows the transformation, of what became known as Ground Zero, over the last ten years. A memorial rises from the ashes of that day on September 11, 2011. -- Paula Nelson (41 photos total)
Photos by Space Imaging’s IKONOS satellite showing the World Trade Center complex in Manhattan, New York, collected on June 30, 2001 showing the 110-stories twin towers; on September 15, 2001 showing the remains of the 1,350-foot (411.48-meter) twin towers of the World Trade Center, and the debris and dust that have settled in Ground Zero, four days after the terrorist attacks; and June 8, 2002, showing the progress in the reclamation of Ground Zero where the twin towers of the World Trade Center once stood. AFP/Space Imaging

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Vladimir Rodionov / AFP - Getty Images

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev holds a special forces sniper rifle during a visit to the 10th Detached Special Purpose Brigade of the Russian Defence Ministry on Monday, Aug. 8, 2011.

Jonathan Woods writes

I present you with this photo knowing full-well that my colleague, David Arnott, just published an image of Russian P.M. Putin. But you can't get too much of a good thing, and pictures of top Russian government officials doing quirky things cannot be published with too great a frequency.

Let's just hope a few U.S. Presidential candidates provide us some fodder in our current election cycle that rival what we've seen in the past.

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China Daily via Reuters

People inspect the scene where a bus dropped at the collapsed Wuyishan Gongguan Bridge in Fujian province, China, on Thursday, July 14.One person died and 22 were injured after the bridge collapsed Thursday morning in east China's Fujian Province.

China Daily / Reuters

Rescuers and injured people are seen at the collapsed Wuyishan Gongguan Bridge in Wuyishan, Fujian province July 14, 2011. One person was killed and 22 others were injured after the bridge collapsed Thursday morning in east China's Fujian province, according to local authorities, Xinhua news agency reported.

Jonathan Woods writes

It's shocking more people were not killed in this accident. No further information was immediately available about the cause of the collapse.

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