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Jack Lowe

Directed by Heather Quinlan - a New Yorker who's lived in all five boroughs - If These Knishes Could Talk is a new short documentary exploring the New York accent: what it is, how it's evolved, and the love/hate relationship New Yorkers have with it. "The New York accent is as much a part of this country as those spacious skies and purple mountains majesty. It's the voice of the melting pot, a lingua franca that united immigrants from all over the world, and became the vibrant soundtrack of a charming, unforgiving and enduring city."

Writer Pete Hamill, director Amy Heckerling, and screenwriter James McBride all appear in the documentary, discussing how a toilet becomes a terlet, and why New Yorkers eat chawclate and drink cawfee, as well as revealing a few surprising facts such as why there's no such thing as a Brooklyn accent, and why an Italian like Rudy Giuliani talks like an Irishman. If These Knishes Could Talk is premiering tonight at the Art of Brooklyn Film Festival and will also be showing at the Hoboken Film Festival and Midtown's Quad Cinema later this year.

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Damaged scaffolding hung from the Brooklyn Bridge on March 13 after a crane being towed behind a tugboat on the East River struck the scaffolding. Traffic across the bridge was snarled but the historic structure was undamaged. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal )


Jaynie Baker appeared with her attorney Robert C. Gottlieb in Manhattan Criminal Court on March 13 on a charge of promoting prostitution. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal )


About 30 children competed in a chess tournament at The Cloisters Museum in New York on March 11. The museum is currently displaying an exhibition ‘The Game of Kings: Medieval Ivory Chessmen from the Isle of Lewis.’ (Ramin Talaie for The Wall Street Journal)


Trent Furnace, center, of Brockport, N.Y., was among hundreds of dancers who came to audition for Pilobolus last week in Midtown. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal )


The steak au poivre at Mon Petit Café, at 801 Lexington Ave. in Manhattan. (Byron Smith for The Wall Street Journal)


Catherine Carbaja wore a costume in the gallery of the Cindy Sherman exhibit at MoMA during a cocktail reception and dance party inside the museum on March 10. (Astrid Stawiarz for The Wall Street Journal)


An Occupy member waved a U.S. flag in New Haven’s camp. The encampment, located on the New Haven Green Park, escaped eviction after a judge granted the activists a stay until March 28. New Haven is one of the last two remaining Occupy camps in New England. (Natalie Keyssar for The Wall Street Journal)


Chocolate lava cake at Meat Me, at 726 Amsterdam Ave., between 95th and 96th streets in New York. (Julie Glassberg for the Wall Street Journal )


Ronald P. Grelsamer showed some of his 1960s Beatles and space program memorabilia. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal )


Armand Olivier Bell searched for a tie to pair with a bottle of Santa Margherita Pinot Grigio at Saks Fifth Avenue. (Natalie Keyssar for The Wall Street Journal)


Artist Elizabeth Behl, who is known as ‘Z,’ debuted her show “Battle For Lagniappe” at 7Eleven Gallery in the West Village. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


The International Gem Tower on West 47th Street in the diamond district of Manhattan. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)


Lloyd Knight, a dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company, rehearsed for the company’s performance of the 1939 comic work ‘Every Soul is a Circus,’ at the Joyce Theater in Manhattan. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)


Flowers bloomed in Battery Park on March 14. (Emily Berl for The Wall Street Journal)

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New York City firefighters battled a four-alarm blaze at 1717 W. Sixth St. in Brooklyn Wednesday. The roof of the building, a commercial furniture operation, fell in. (Peter J. Smith for The Wall Street Journal)


Serkan Ozkaya’s double-size, golden replica of Michelangelo’s David was toted through Manhattan streets on a flatbed trailer Tuesday, as part of its trip from Istanbul via New York to Louisville, Ky. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


A dancer auditioned Sunday in Manhattan for a spot in the Manhattan Youth Ballet’s Summer Intensive workshop. About 80 participants will take part in a three-week workshop in August. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)


Harriette Rose Katz looked through the Chanel handbags in a walk-in closet in her Upper East Side apartment Monday. Ms. Katz is a well-regarded event planner in New York City. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal)


The pizza of the day included shrimp as a topping one recent day at Da Mikele on Church Street in Manhattan. (Byron Smith for The Wall Street Journal)


The new Espresso Book Machine at work binding ‘Super Sudoko Variants’ at the Brooklyn Central Library. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal)


Roman Baca, 37, of Astoria, worked with fellow dancers Meaghan Doherty, left, a 25-year-old Upper East Side resident, and Jennifer Cadden, 28, of Hell’s Kitchen, at Dany studios in Manhattan Wednesday. Mr. Baca, a former Marine, will teach dance to children in Erbil and Kirkurk, Iraq, in April. (Andrew Hinderaker for The Wall Street Journal)


Honorees talked among themselves before the start of the sixth annual ceremony recognizing Brooklyn’s Extraordinary Women by Kings County District Attorney Charles J. Hynes in Downtown Brooklyn Tuesday. This year 33 women were recognized. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal )

Fashion designer Isabel Toledo, shown here in her Manhattan studio in February, aims to use her own experiences to build a case against the corporate nature of the New York fashion industry, in her book ‘Roots of Style
Fashion designer Isabel Toledo, shown here in her Manhattan studio in February, aims to use her own experiences to build a case against the corporate nature of the New York fashion industry, in her book ‘Roots of Style: Weaving Together Life, Love, and Fashion.’ (Byron Smith for The Wall Street Journal)


Dancer Christopher Klein, 21, right, on the court at a basketball game between St. John’s University and Syracuse at Madison Square Garden. For the last two years, he has been the lone male on the St. John’s dance team. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal)


Friends of the High Line staff member Yvette Weaver helped at the start of the ‘spring cutback’ at the High Line elevated park in Manhattan Tuesday. Volunteers and staffers are trimming back the plants in preparation for spring. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal )


Artist Michael Riedel, left, and Paul Pisoni, director of production at the David Zwirner Gallery, discussed Mr. Riedel’s work as they prepared to install a piece at the gallery’s booth at The Armory Show at Piers 92 and 94 in Manhattan Tuesday. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal )


From left, Steven Holz, Michael Goldberg, Jonathan Cline and Ira Rothstein at H. Herzfeld Fine Men’s Haberdashery in Midtown. Step into the shop, barely noticeable on a busy East Midtown block, and you enter Old New York. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal )


A new exhibition at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, called ‘Nomads and Networks: The Ancient Art and Culture of Kazakhstan,’ opened Wednesday and runs through June 3. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)


Sushi chef Akira Nakazana at work in the sushi bar of Lure Fishbar, 142 Mercer St. in Manhattan. (See related article.) (Byron Smith for The Wall Street Journal)


Brian Martin and Emily Riley enjoyed the warm weather in Manhattan’s Central Park Thursday, as temperatures pushed near 70 degrees. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)

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Mario Tama / Getty Images

Tourists and onlookers view the World Trade Center site from the plaza of the Millenium Hilton Hotel on July 19, 2011 in New York City. The hotel is across the street from the World Trade Center and suffered significant damage in the 9-11 attacks. It was refurbished and reopened in May, 2003.

Mario Tama, a Getty Images photographer, was at home on the Lower East Side of Manhattan on Sept. 11, 2001, when he got the call that something big was happening at the World Trade Center site. After grabbing his cameras and coming around the corner, Tama saw the huge hole in the north tower and immediately thought of war – a subject he hadn’t covered before. 

The events of 9/11 turned out to be Tama’s introduction to war photography, something he never wanted to do. Even after photographing Hurricane Katrina and the start of the Iraq War – two events with much human suffering – Tama says 9/11 is the “most shocking thing I’ve ever covered.”

So when Tama was asked to shoot a special series of photographs for the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, he understood the significance. But living and working in New York City, he’d been to the site so many times over the years (by his estimation at least 125 times), he felt he needed a new way look at it in order to reinvigorate his senses.

Mario Tama / Getty Images

During a blessing of the World Trade Center cross before it was moved into its permanent home at the 9/11 Memorial Museum on July 23, 2011 in New York City. The cross is an intersecting steel beam discovered in the World Trade Center rubble which served as symbol of spiritual recovery in the aftermath of 9/11.

Tama was looking for a different kind of camera to shoot with when he ran into another photojournalist, Craig Ruttle, who suggested he check out the Lomo camera known as the "Sprocket – Rocket." Manhattan is vertical, a city island of skyscrapers and vertical spaces. But Tama sees the former World Trade Center site as horizontal, as a crater, so the panoramic nature of the Lomo format seemed right to him.

Additionally, he felt that shooting on film, something he hadn’t done since before the attacks, would help bring him back in time. In particular, Tama would be using black and white film, which he thought would better connect the current location with its history. Tama vividly remembers the day of the attacks, but because of the dust covering everything, he sees that day in his mind's eye as essentially black and white. 

Over the last month or so, Tama went back to the site again and again with his Lomo and photographed it. He plans to continue going back there with his new camera until Sept. 11, and will be there on that day covering the memorial events.

Mario Tama / Getty Images

A couple embraces on the Hudson River waterfront with Lower Manhattan and the rising One World Trade Center in the background on July 6, 2011 in Jersey City, New Jersey.

 

Tama says he has been to Ground Zero so many times it often feels like "just another piece of real estate," which he characterizes as a "great thing" because it helps him cope. Still, he expects the approach of the anniversary to be heart-wrenching. But just knowing, he says, that people around the world care about what happened on 9/11 and can empathize what he and so many others are feeling will make it easier to complete his work.

More photos from Mario Tama's 9-11 project in our slideshow.

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Paula Carano, center, arrived in the rain at the American Ballet Theatre’s Annual Spring Gala at the Metropolitan Opera House on May 16. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


Vahap Avsar’s sculpture ‘NONEISAFE’ on display at the Charles Bank Gallery on the Bowery. Here. Mr. Avsar with the work, which he created from a State Police cruiser he bought for $800. (Jesse Neider for the Wall Street Journal)


Little was left of a four-family home in Staten Island after an explosion and fire early Tuesday. One person was reported injured. Spencer Taylor Jr., who used to be the building’s super, and his dog Ruckus at the scene. The cause is under investigation. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


A vehicle collided with a light-rail train in Jersey City on May 17, and an 80-year-old passenger injured and trapped inside the car had to be freed by emergency personnel. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


Umbrellas were out during a rain-soaked morning rush hour in Manhattan on May 17. (Kevin Hagen for the Wall Street Journal)


The White Lady, a cocktail made with raspberries, lemon, vodka and St. Germain, at Tiny’s in Lower Manhattan. (Agaton Strom for The Wall Street Journal)


A dog named Rufus joined the 2011 AIDS Walk New York on May 15, despite the rain. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)


Members of the Pandas Pawn, the chess team from P.S. 124 in Manhattan’s Chinatown, at practice on May 13. Earlier this month, the elementary school team won the second-highest level at the national high school chess tournament. (Natalie Keyssar for The Wall Street Journal)


Jack Basora, 10 years old, running towards DIA Beacon after coming to the modern art museum to attend a dance performance with his class from Manhattan’s P.S. 3. (Natalie Keyssar for The Wall Street Journal)


The three cheese melt of gruyere, fontina and goat and roasted tomatoes at the Melt Shop. (Ramsay de Give for The Wall Street Journal)


A group of invitees got a sneak peek at Ryoji Ikeda’s ‘The Transfinite’ at the Park Avenue Armory. The multimedia installation will serve as the third annual visual-arts commission in the 55,000-square-foot space. It will open to the public Friday. (Benjamin Norman for The Wall Street Journal)


Olympia Kazi, senior director of Van Alen Institute, at the Van Alen book store and project space in Midtown. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal)


Officer James Rodgers with a knife that doubles as belt buckle, which he confiscated as part of job at Kings County Supreme Court. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal)


Natalia Polunin recieves lieutennt’s bars from her husband, William O’Neill, and she returns the honor as both were among 19 Emergency Medical Service paramedics promoted to the ran Monday. Ceremonies were held at the New York Fire Department’s headquaters in Brooklyn. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


The scene near a shooting in Staten Island. Police killed Ilya Iglanov in the basement of a home in the Annadale neighborhood on Tuesday after he shot Semyom Levin and his wife, Marina Tartakouskaya, inside their home. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


The New Jersey coastline shrouded in fog on Monday, as seen from the Harlem Piers at 125th Street. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal)

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