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The Future belongs to the ones who will dare to invent it - Domenico Zungri at TEDxBologna

Seguici su Facebook www.facebook.com Future (R)Evolution Domenico is an Experience Designer, specialized in the development of Immersive Simulations for educational, professional, and entertainment purposes. He earned a Master Degree in Digital Entertainment at the VRMMP (Virtual Reality & MultiMedia Park) of Turin, worked as Game Designer for Milestone srl in Milan, and specialized in Theme Park & Attraction Design with Steve Alcorn, CEO of Alcorn McBrIde inc. In 2011 he was awarded at the International Social Innovation Competition for a project about engaging 'at risk' kids through the Interactive Technologies of Video Games, and currently he collaborates with professor Alfonso Molina - Scientific Director of the Foundation "Mondo Digitale" - for the study and the prototipation of Immersive Serious Games aimed at the social inclusion of sensitive categories (children, elderlies, migrants, disabled). Domenico is the founder of Future Labs: a project of Technology Park dedicated to the Research, Development and Training on Immersive and Emergent Technologies, finalized to innovative processes of Social Design. The structure comprises an Experimental Center for Future Studies, an Immersive Theme Park with educational experiences for schools and families, a Residential Campus for Higher Education in the authorial professions of the field, and Production Studios for the development of immersive services and events. The project is highly focused on school education, and <b>...</b>
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In today’s pictures, a refugee cries in Myanmar, a man dressed as Santa votes in Chile, Bengals are displayed at a cat show in Croatia, and more.

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A recent Thursday at 10:23 a.m.: In the basement of Arion Press, where they still print books the old-fashioned way, Lewis Mitchell slid open a box of parts used to change the font size on the Monotype casting machines he has maintained for 62 years.

“I thoroughly enjoy the sound of the machines turning, and seeing the type come out is a joy,” Mitchell said.

He can tell by the sound of the moving springs and levers if something is awry with his machines — a skill he said all good technicians should have. Four different owners have run the business since Mitchell walked through the doors at age 18, and he has had several opportunities to leave, including a scholarship to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that he declined. Now 80, Mitchell can’t imagine retiring from the job he loves so much.

When Mitchell started making this kind of type, it was really the only way to print things, and now he doesn’t know how many books he’s helped print over the decades. There were once type-casting operations in most major U.S. cities, but now the practice is almost extinct. There are only two companies left in the world that cast type for printing presses, and Arion is by far the largest.

Mitchell has four grown children and nine grandchildren, but he calls the 20 type-casting machines his “babies.” “I treat them with kindness. I don’t use a hammer on them or an oversized screwdriver.” The first machine, which started the company during 1915 Panama Pacific International Exposition, is still its best machine — proof that Mitchell’s methods work. “My dad taught me from square one if you going to do something, you’re going to do it right or you don’t do it.”

By San Francisco Chronicle.

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The human resources department is known for being touchy-feely, but in the age of big data, it’s becoming a bit more cold and analytical. From figuring out what schools to recruit from to what employees should be offered flexible work arrangements, data analytics are helping HR professionals make more informed decisions.

European Pressphoto Agency
Jonah Hill in a scene from ‘Moneyball’.

The success of Oscar nominated film Moneyball isn’t hurting either, said James Raybould, director of insights at LinkedIn. The movie, based on the Michael Lewis book, tells the true story of Oakland A’s General Manager Billy Beane. Using statistical analysis, Beane was able to recruit undervalued baseball players and lead his underfunded baseball club to the playoffs.

“We’re seeing a lot of companies actually aspire to that movie,” he said last week during a panel on big data at the Impact 2012: The Business of Talent conference convened by consulting group Bersin & Associates. “How do I make Moneyball for HR?”

Capital One, the credit card company and bank, has automated data reports on employee attrition, headcount and promotions. It is also beginning to analyze the characteristics of its most successful employees, like what schools they went to and what their majors were, said Mark Williams, statistical analysis manager for workforce analytics at Capital One. “Now we’re going back through resumes and creating a lot of that data,” he said.

In the wake of the financial crisis, when the compensation structure of many banks were criticized for incentivizing excessive risk-taking, Williams has also been asked to do an analysis of how pay is linked to sales performance.

“We do risk very well; we don’t lend to people who won’t pay us back…. Part of that is we have really good governance over our credit models; we have a staff of statisticians and that’s their job,” he said. “What I’m looking to do is a very similar thing in creating a governance process around some of the risk metrics for compensation.”

The big data revolution is just beginning to penetrate the HR industry, said Josh Bersin, chief executive and president of Bersin & Associates. Some companies have a progressive view of how data analytics can help their HR departments. Most don’t. “Of the companies we talk to, five to 15% are very sophisticated at analyzing people data,” he said.

At Luxottica Group, the Milan-based eyeglasses conglomerate, data analytics have disproven assumptions about gaps within the company’s recruiting strategy, said Sean Dineen, vice president of talent management and organizational development.

The data showed it took an average 96 days to fill a position with an external candidate. The management team believed that the company’s recruiters acted too slow, but a statistical analysis found hiring managers dragged their feet about making decisions about who to hire, Dineen said. It now takes the company 46 days to hire external candidates.

Luxottica, the parent company of brands like Ray-Ban and Oakley, is also using analytics to see how well it is does in promoting its best employees. “Are we actually moving high potential people?” he said. “Why is this person [who rates highly] in the way we evaluate talent in the same job they were four years ago?”

Joseph Walker covers technology for FINS.com, The Wall Street Journal’s jobs and career website.

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TEDxSalford - Prof. Vito Di Bari - Innovation Design

Vito Di Bari is an acclaimed futurologist and an authority on innovation. Mixing Italian strengths of creativity and design with strong scientific analysis, he explains future mega-trends and scenarios of our fast-pace changing world. He is the Innovation Designer of Milan's World Expo 2015. He is recognized worldwide for his numerous innovative theories, and multitude of published works. Exploring the future of technology applied to everyday life, Vito shows you how our lives will change and why. Connecting recent discoveries in media, nanotech and robotics, he explains how corporations and individuals will change their behaviours and attitudes. He expertly analyzes for his audiences the intersections between the future success of trends and the adoption of innovations and their impact on our lifestyles. Post production done by twitter.com About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
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Before he was executive director of the Herb Ritts Foundation, Mark McKenna was renowned photographer Herb Ritts’s camera assistant. In a recent interview Mr. McKenna tells about the making of the iconic image of the model Christy Turlington seen from the back, in a keyhole of white surrounded by the dramatic shadow of black fabric pulling upwards. He recalls that Ritts was “an incredible director of people…not just telling them what to do, but getting them to step in and be a part of the process.”

On this day, there was a sense of “play” in the air, despite the important client, Versace. Out in the Mojave desert, in full sun on the dry lake bed, El Mirage, with a small but able team, Ritts was in his element. As the model Christy Turlington held the fabric in front of her, the crew tied the outer corners to weighted stands on either side. All at once, the desert wind blew up the cone of fabric like an inside-out balloon, and Ritts had his moment. Minutes afterward, a storm rolled in and the crew rushed to clear out. The exhibition Herb Ritts: L.A. Style, opened April 3rd at The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, and is accompanied by a book of the same name from Getty Publications.


Versace Dress, Back View, El Mirage, 1990. © Herb Ritts Foundation


Christy Turlington, Versace 3, Milan, 1991. © Herb Ritts Foundation


Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Point Dume, 1987. © Herb Ritts Foundation


Male Nude with Socks I, Los Angeles (Mark Findlay), 1990. © Herb Ritts Foundation


Greg Louganis, Hollywood, 1985. Herb Ritts Foundation

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