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“All I want to do is take pictures. I don’t care about anything else,” says celebrated photojournalist Bruce Davidson. The quote is from Cheryl Dunn’s new documentary Everybody Street, which chronicles the masters of New York street photography — from the confrontational Bruce Gilden to hip hop documentarian Ricky Powell. The project has been in the works for a while, and according to the official site, distribution still hasn’t been nailed down, but hopefully the slightly NSFW trailer below can tide you over until its broader release.

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Brooklyn-based photographer Ryan Page creates work that’s utterly timeless; street photographs of his native New York captured with an unassuming eye. His monochrome images have a film noir moodiness that recalls Hitchcock and a narrative ambiguity that’s evocative of the mysterious tangential plots of fellow New-Yorker Paul Auster. Ryan makes his images with mystery in mind, as he told The New Yorker: “Mystery is a word I come back to a lot in my work. I’m always inspired by the mystery that’s invoked when we look at images whose context is unknown. I believe the mind is attracted to these types of images because they force viewers to use their own imagination, allowing them to experience the wonder of possibility.”

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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When Urban Compass debuted to the public in May of this year, it had its fair share of doubters. The company was trying to reinvent the process of searching for an apartment in New York, a notoriously expensive, difficult, and fraud-filled endeavor. Four months later the company is approaching profitability, raising another $20 million in venture capital, and plotting its expansion into new cities like San Francisco, Boston, and Chicago

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35-drake-1348868073

Since The Internet welcomes all kinds of feelings, come find yourself in Sensi Sessions. Each Sensi Session offers a monthly roundup of music that's slightly sensitive; here you'll find music that goes from the vibe of Rich Homie Quan's "Type of Way" to deep thoughts in minimal dance music. Sensi is whatever you let it be, and this month's selection ranges from weirdo pop from Australian-born Martin King, Drake vs Jhené Aiko and a Le1f cut that goes extra deep.

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At yesterday’s Ampersand New York web typography conference in the Times Center at The New York Times, Font Bureau designer/technologist (and A List Apart columnist) Nick Sherman demo’d Size Calculator, a web application created to bring screen design a capability that print design has enjoyed for 500 years.

It is trivial for a designer to set type (or any artwork) to appear at a specific size in centimeters or inches on the printed page. But it is impossible to do so when designing for screens. Here’s how Zen it gets: if I use CSS to set a line of type at 65cm, it will most certainly not be 65cm tall—nor does the W3C expect it to be. Actual size will depend on the dimensions and resolution of the screen. (Perceived size will of course depend on viewing distance, but that is true for print as well.)

Likewise, if I want an image or a line of type to appear to be exactly the same size when viewed on different screens—say, on a smartphone and a desktop monitor—there’s no way to achieve that, either.

Size Calculator solves these problems by using JavaScript to do the math.

What it is good for: if you know the dimensions and resolution of your device (be it a wall screen at a conference, a digital billboard, or a specific model phone held in a specific orientation), you can finally do the things I mentioned in the paragraphs above. Same size type on different screens viewed at different distances? Achievement unlocked. Another thing Nick did in his demo was to “print” an exact size dollar bill on the screen in the Times Center auditorium. He proved that it worked by walking to the screen and holding the actual dollar in front of the projected dollar. He then printed a life-size image of himself. Fun!

What it is not good for: although Size Calculator is exciting, it would not be good for responsive web design, because RWD is about designing for a universe of unknown devices, resolutions, and capabilities.

But if you are designing for a limited set of known screens, the sky’s the limit—literally: your design can take miles or km into account. If you’ve always wanted to make a ten thousand foot letter display at 12pt when viewed from a helicopter, now’s your chance.

What will you do with Size Calculator?

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