Skip navigation
Help

Newport

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

According to the latest jobs numbers, issued by the Labor Department on January 6, the U.S. unemployment rate has dropped to 8.5 percent, down from 10 percent in 2009. The Great Recession has claimed more than 8.5 million jobs since 2007, and even though the current trajectory of the U.S. appears to be toward recovery, Americans are still struggling to find work. Nine of the photographs below appear in The Atlantic's January/February 2012 print issue, and I've added 25 more here to round out a collection of images from these years of uncertainty -- of men and women both at work and out of work in the United States. [34 photos]

A workman steams a U.S. flag in preparation for a planned visit by President Barack Obama, on April 6, 2011, at wind turbine manufacture Gamesa Technology Corporation in Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

0
Your rating: None

As 2011 draws to a close, Framework looks back on an eventful, tumultuous year, documented by the photojournalists of the Los Angeles Times.

It was a year marked by the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan; the Arab Spring in North Africa and the Middle East, with rebel uprisings and hard-fought battles resulting in the fall of Egypt’s president, Hosni Mubarak, and the capture and death of Libya’s Moammar Kadafi; and the humanitarian crisis of continued famine in Africa.

2011 also saw the somber 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks of 2001; the rise of the Occupy Wall Street movement; the royal wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton in London and their subsequent Southland visit; and the involuntary manslaughter trial, conviction and sentencing of Michael Jackson’s personal physician.

Carmageddon in Los Angeles, anticipated with dire predictions of monumental gridlock, turned out to be not so disruptive after all.

Almost nine years after the invasion of Iraq, the war was declared officially over with the withdrawal of all U.S. combat troops and their return home — in time for the holidays, no less.

As always, the worlds of entertainment, sports and celebrity are part of the gallery, adding a light, colorful touch to a memorable year.

Enjoy the look back with us, and have a wonderful 2012.

0
Your rating: None

IN MOURNING
IN MOURNING: Dagmar Havlova, seen through the window of a hearse, and thousands of Czechs paid their respects to her husband, Vaclav Havel, in Prague Wednesday. Mr. Havel, whose ‘Velvet Revolution’ toppled communist rule, died Sunday at age 75 after a respiratory illness. (David W Cerny/Reuters)

MANY OPTIONS
MANY OPTIONS: A vendor sat near displays of cellphone numbers of Kuwait’s Zain and South Africa’s MTN carriers in Khartoum, Sudan, Wednesday. (Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters)

SOLDIERS STRETCH
SOLDIERS STRETCH: Soldiers rehearsed Wednesday on Rajpath Boulevard in New Delhi for India’s upcoming Republic Day celebrations. (Kevin Frayer/Associated Press)

DIGGING OUT
DIGGING OUT: A boy shoveled mud from his home in Iligan, Philippines, Wednesday. Flash flooding from Typhoon Washi left hundreds of people dead and displaced hundreds of thousands. (Erik De Castro/Reuters)

HELPING HANDS
HELPING HANDS: Soldiers carried Zeinab al-Shogery, whose leg is injured, from a polling station in Giza, Egypt, Wednesday. The country is holding staggered parliamentary elections. Recent clashes between the military and pro-democracy activists have left at least 14 people dead. (Nasser Nasser/Associated Press)

VOTER OUTREACH
VOTER OUTREACH: Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov.Romney waved to voters inside a pizza parlor in Newport, N.H., Wednesday. (Jessica Rinaldi/Reuters)

0
Your rating: None

Features and Essays

I love 15th of every month as the following month’s National Geographic features hit their feature hub… Two good photojournalism pieces in the October issue…which I’m very much hoping to receive in the mail…We became annual subscribers for the first time…Time mag too… Buying single copies ends up getting rather costly…

Terrific photos by Kitra Cahana…Subject: “Moody. Impulsive. Maddening. Why do teenagers act the way they do? “…

Kitra Cahana: Teenage Brains (NGM: October 2011) Cahana’s website

Mark Leong: Ulanbaatar, Mongolia (NGM: September 2011)

If you enjoyed Leong’s essay, do also see Timothy Fadek’s Mongolia work…done last year, but definitely worth having a look, if you aren’t familiar with it…

Timothy Fadek: Mongolia: Golden Promises (Photographer’s website: September 2011)

Uriel Sinai documents life West Bank settlements as Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas prepares to ask the United Nations for statehood…

Uriel Sinai: Inside West Bank Settlements (Time: September 2011)

Related…

Amnon Gutman: The Promised Land (Foreign Policy: September 2011)

Julien Goldstein: Ramallah: Portrait of a West Bank City (MSNBC: September 2011)

Stefan Boness: White City (Panos: September 2011) Tel Aviv

To other stories…

Dominic Nahr: Somalia: The Catastrophic Famine (Magnum: September 2011)

Larry Towell: Afghanistan 2011: MEDEVAC and the Taliban Close-up (Magnum: September 2011)

Denis Dailleux: Scenes from a Ghana Witch Camp (Newsweek: September 2011)

Mads Nissen: Chinese Roulette (Panos: September 2011)

Warrick Page: Pakistan Floods (Guardian: September 2011)

Seamus Murphy: 17 Years in Afghanistan (Life: September 2011)

New York Times: Repressing the Religious Majority (NYT: September 2011) Photographer’s name withheld probably for security reasons

Brendan Corr: Faithful Albion (Panos: September 2011)

Chiara Tocci: Life After Zog (Foto8: September 2011) Tocci’s website

New Yorker: Beyond Words: Photography in the New Yorker (New Yorker: September 2011)

Sam Phelps: Train Portraits Pakistan (Photographer’s website: September 2011)

Sam Phelps: Gadani Ship Breaking Yard, Pakistan (Photographer’s website: September 2011)

Steven Siewert: Viva Las Vegas Rockabilly! (Agence Vu: 2011)

Piotr Malecki: Where Meat Means Money (Panos: September 2011)

Martina Bacigalupo: Wanawake, Being a Woman in Congo (Agence Vu: 2011)

I didn’t know Ara Güler is a Magnum photographer…That’s what Guardian states anyway, and indeed his photos are in the Magnum archive, eventhough he is not listed in the members….Enjoyed these Istanbul frames…Especially since we are heading there end of November for Veronica’s 25th birthday…

Ara Güler: Istanbul (Guardian: September 2011)

Newsweek: The Mexican Suitcase: History Lost and Found (Newsweek: September 2011) Related in NYT T Magazine

Ron Haviv: Blood on the Grass (VII Magazine: September 2011)

Ron Haviv: The Making of Dan Choi (Global Post: September 2011)

Kate Brooks: In the Light of Darkness: A Photographer’s Journey After 9/11 (TIME LB: September 2011)

TIME Lightbox featured some of the great work available for purchase at Friends of Anton to support Anton Hammerl’s children…

photo: Kenneth Jarecke

TIME Lightbox: Banding Together for a Fallen Colleague: The Friends of Anton (TIME LB: September 2011)

Also available at Friends of Anton…Yuri Kozyrev’s iconic Libya photo… Remember the moment he took it?  Others running away, but Yuri still shooting behind Tyler Hicks.

It’s great so many photographers have donated prints…Now they need people buying ‘em!

More features…

Allison Payne: College Bound (TIME LB: September 2011)

Zhe Chen: Bees (Inge Morath Foundation: September 2011)

Elinor Carucci: Pregnancy, Birth, and Motherhood (TIME LB: September 2011)

Lori Grinker: Piecing Together an Ancestral Puzzle (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Greg Constantine: The Places Where Nowhere Is Home (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Andre Liohn: Arab Spring (Photographer’s archive: September 2011)

Etienne de Malglaive: Storming Tripoli (Photographer’s archive: September 2011)

Interviews

Photographer Kitra Cahana talks about her NatGeo assignment about teenagers…

Kitra Cahana (NG: September 2011)

Toby Smith (MorningNews: September 2011)

Martin Parr and his fancy new camera…he seems to be pretty excited about it as you can see below…

Martin Parr (Youtube: September 2011)

Although, it’s not really his camera, is it? Magnum have partnered with Nintendo…. Related  on PopPhoto and PetaPixel

Some really good interviews on the Ideas Tap website…

George Georgiou : Photographer (IdeasTap: September 2011)

“I invest myself emotionally in the people I photograph – not just to gain their trust but also to make myself feel comfortable. I’m not a quick, brash photographer – I was encouraged at Newport to understand compassion and humility and understanding, and that’s something I’ve tried to adhere to. “- Ivor Prickett

Ivor Prickett : Photojournalist (IdeasTap: September 2011)

“Realistically, unless you’re an individual like Ryan McGinley, it’s going to take 10 years to establish yourself: five years to pay the rent and five years to hone your practice. But the beauty about photography is, if you make it work for you, you never have to retire” – David Birkett

David Birkett : Photography Assistant (IdeasTap: September 2011)

Laura El-Tantawy (Burn: September 2011)

Martin Roemers (Noorderlicht festival: 2011)

Hans Aarsman (Ted Talks video on Conscientious: 2011)

Sebastian Junger (Guardian: September 2011)

Damon Winter (APE: September 2011)

Erroll Morris :  Truth Outside Photographs (NPR: September 2011)

Doug Mills (C-Span: 2008)

Jason Howe (BBC: September 2011)

Fernando Moleres (BJP: September 2011)

Michael Mack : Mack Books: From print to the iPad (BJP: September 2011)

Platon on Perry: Behind the Scenes of the Cover of TIME (TIME LB: September 2011)

Philip-Lorca diCorcia (ASX: 2011)

Kosuke Okahara (La Lettre: September 2011)

Philip Cheung (Thisisthewhat: 2011)

Pete Brook (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Pete Brook (BJP blog: September 2011)

Articles

John Stanmeyer has written more about working for National  Geographic…

Must read. John Stanmeyer: The Amazing Yellow-Bordered Magazine, Part II (Photographer’s blog: September 2011) Side note: Noticed Stanmayer’s blog presents us a differently processed file from his NGM Girl Power story. His own vision?

Joao Silva back at work…

NYT Lens: Joao Silva at the White House (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Olivier Sarbil was injured in Libya last week…

French freelance journalist wounded in Libya as NTC battles on (Vanguard: September 17, 2011)

Olivier’s friends have shared info on Facebook that he is now back in France, at Percy Hospital in Paris – a military hospital that specializes in injuries from the battlefield. I wish him good recovery. | Olivier’s website

Very good piece on pricing your work….

Jessica Hische: The Dark Art of Pricing (Jessica Hische blog: 2011)

Guardian: Joel Sternfeld’s First Pictures: the opening chapter of a colourful career (Guardian: September 2011)

photo: Peter van Agtmael

Leo Hsu: HomeFrontLine at Silver Eye (Foto8: September 2011) the exhibition

photo: Christopher Anderson

BJP: iPublish: Photojournalists turn to the iPad to tell their stories (BJP: September 2011)

BBC: On Bruce Davidson Subway photos (BBC: September 2011)

Foto8: Preview of Jocelyn Bain Hogg’s new book The Family (foto8: September 2011)

Thames and Hudson: Magnum Contact Sheets: Design # 2 – The Jacket (Thames and Hudson blog: September 2011)

David Campbell: Who Believes Photographs (DC: September 2011)

PDN: Burmese Photojournalist Sentenced to 10 More Years (PDN: September 2011)

APE: Real World Estimates – Magazine Article Reprints by Jess Dudley (APE: September 2011)

Unbelievable….

Poynter: Daily Mail lifts from WP, then asks its reporter for help finding photo (Poynter: September 2011)

Life: Taking Great Portraits (Life: September 2011)

Huffington Post: Reuters Raises Profile With Marquee Hires, Editor Aims To Become ‘Best In The World’ (HP: September 2011)

The 14 Most Influential Cameras of All Time (Adorama: September 2011)

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Attila Balazs (Guardian: September 2011)

Guardian: Wolfgang Tillmans’s best shot (Guardian: September 2011)

photo: Jason Lee

Reuters: Unmasking the masked boy (Reuters blog: September 2011)

NPR: A Teenager’s Photo That Helped Inspire Libya’s Revolutionaries (NPR: September 2011)

Crowd funding…

PhotoShelter : 14 Tips to Crowdfund Your Next Photo Project (PS: September 2011)

Social Media Examiner: 11 Tips for Crowdfunding: How to Raise Money From Strangers 

Events

Epen Rasmussen : Transit : Frontline Club : 7pm Thursday : 22 September

multimedia

World Press Photo Enter

Awards, Grant, and Competitions

Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize shortlisted works seen in the Guardian last week… (see that bigger here)

BJP: Shortlist unveiled for Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2011

International Photography Award 2011 | Deadline extended | Entries close 26th September 2011

Unicef POY 2011 (Lightstalkers)

Conscientious Portfolio Competition 2011 Winners

Congratulations to Matt Dunham and other winners at The Picture Editors’ Guild Awards…

Journalism.co.uk: AP photographer overall winner in press photography awards |slideshow The Picture Editors’ Guild Awards 2011 (Guardian: September 2011)

BJP: Deadline approaching for Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award

Young Photographer of the Year Competition 2011 

Screenings

MSF Delivers 3D film exhibition at Spitalfields market in London from 22nd to 27th September…I went to Duckrabbit/MSF 3D photofilm premiere on Monday at Royal Society of Medicine here in London, I was very impressed.

Videos

Annie Leibovitz : Life Through a Lens 

Nick Turpin: In- sight

Portfolio reviews

Roof Unit Portfolio Reviews 

Photographers

Zalmai

Samuel Aranda

Jamie-James Medina

Scott Goldsmith

Katherine Leedale

Mary Turner | archive

To finish off… Dingle!!!!

Final end note…The Twitter feed has now 20,000 followers. Can’t be all bots,so thanks for following.I’ll try my best to keep the tweets relevant and interesting…

0
Your rating: None

Billy Stinson (L) comforts his daughter Erin Stinson as they sit on the steps where their cottage once stood August 28, 2011 in Nags Head, North Carolina. The cottage, built in 1903 and destroyed yesterday by Hurricane Irene, was one of the first vacation cottages built on Albemarle Sound in Nags Head. Stinson has owned the home, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, since 1963. “We were pretending, just for a moment, that the cottage was still behind us and we were just sitting there watching the sunset,” said Erin afterward.

Hurricane Irene moved along the east coast causing heavy flooding damage as far north as Vermont and shutting down the entire New York mass transit system.

0
Your rating: None


The Senate just drove a stake into the Navy’s high-tech heart. The directed energy and electromagnetic weapons intended to protect the surface ships of the future? Terminated.

The Free Electron Laser and the Electromagnetic Railgun are experimental weapons that the Navy hope will one day burn missiles careening toward their ships out of the sky and fire bullets at hypersonic speeds at targets thousands of miles away. Neither will be ready until at least the 2020s, the Navy estimates. But the Senate Armed Services Committee has a better delivery date in mind: never.

The committee approved its version of the fiscal 2012 defense authorization bill on Friday, priced to move at $664.5 billion, some $6.4 billion less than what the Obama administration wanted. The bill “terminates” the Free Electron Laser and the railgun, a summary released by the committee gleefully reports.

“The determination was that the Free Electron Laser has the highest technical risk in terms of being ultimately able to field on a ship, so we thought the Navy could better concentrate on other laser programs,” explains Rick DeBobes, the chief of staff for the committee. “With the Electromagnetic Railgun, the committee felt the technical challenges to developing and fielding the weapon would be daunting, particularly [related to] the power required and the barrel of the gun having limited life.”

Both weapons are apples in the eye of the Office of Naval Research, the mad scientists of the Navy. “We’re fast approaching the limits of our ability to hit maneuvering pieces of metal in the sky with other maneuvering pieces of metal,” its leader, Rear Adm. Nevin Carr, told me in February. The answer, he thinks, is hypersonics and directed energy weapons, hastening “the end of the dominance of the missile,” Adm. Gary Roughead, the top officer in the Navy, told me last month. With China developing carrier-killer missiles and smaller missiles proliferating widely, both weapons would allow the Navy to blunt the missile threat and attack adversaries from vast distances.

And both have recently experienced technical milestones that made researchers squeal with glee.

In December, the Navy corralled reporters to Dahlgren, Virginia, to watch a railgun the size of a schoolbus fire a 23-pound bullet using no moving parts — just 33 megajoules of energy, a world record. (A prototype of a ship-ready railgun is pictured above.)

And this winter, the Free Electron Laser, the most powerful and sophisticated laser there is, boasted two big advances within a month. In January, its 14-kilowatt prototype passed tests that injected enough energy into it to get it up to a megawatt’s worth of death ray — a “remarkable breakthrough,” nine months ahead of schedule, the Office of Naval Research crowed. The next month, its testers at the Jefferson Lab in Newport News added even more power. Researchers think it could be far more than a weapon: it might act as a super-sensor, and Yale scientists use it to hunt for cosmic energy.

Shipboard power is the question mark surrounding both weapons. The laser and the railgun require diverting power from a ship’s generators in order to fire. The Navy’s waved that away, saying that its onboard generators — especially the superpowerful ones in development — can handle the megawattage necessary, and the Free Electron Laser’s guts are shaped like a racetrack to “recycle” some of the energy injected into it. But both plans rely on the power efficiency of ships that aren’t built yet.

Neither comes cheap, either. The Navy’s spent some $211 million since 2005 developing the railgun. Its milestones with the Free Electron Laser — in development in some form since the ’90s — led it to ask Congress for $60 million in annual directed-energy research funds, most of which go to the superlaser. Needless to say, a Senate panel facing a huge budget crunch was unsympathetic.

The Office of Naval Research didn’t respond by press time. The process of passing a defense budget making it through no fewer than four committees and two floor votes, so it’s not like these programs cease to exist. But unless the Navy makes a big push for its futuristic weapons, both of them will die on the drawing board.

Photo: Spencer Ackerman

See Also:

0
Your rating: None