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ILULISSAT, Greenland (AP) — Greenland’s Inuit people have countless terms to describe ice in all its varieties. This gallery of photographs by Brennan Linsley of The Associated Press is something of a visual vocabulary for the striking forms ice takes on the giant Arctic island.

Greenland’s ice sheet and glaciers are melting more and more as the world warms, sending gushing water and towering icebergs into the sea, threatening to raise ocean levels worldwide in the years and decades to come. Researchers are hard at work trying to gauge how much will melt and when.

Some of the most spectacular icebergs are calved from the 4-mile-wide Jakobshavn Glacier near the town of Ilulissat on Greenland’s west central coast. These icebergs push out into the 30-mile-long Ilulissat Ice Fjord, and then into Disko Bay and eventually the North Atlantic ocean.

The ice, much of it tens of thousands of years old, originates in the 660,000-square-mile ice sheet covering 80 percent of Greenland.

 Greenland Ice

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Attached by rope to a waiting helicopter, researcher Carl Gladish walks back after deploying a GPS seismometer, or GeoPebble, to track glacial movement on Jakobshavn Glacier, near Ilulissat, Greenland. Chief researcher David Holland, hopes to eventually deploy scores of the devices to measure ice loss in Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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In this July 26, 2011 photo, a melting iceberg floats along a fjord leading away from the edge of the Greenland ice sheet near Nuuk, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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In this July 18, 2011 photo, icebergs shed from the Greenland ice sheet float near Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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In this July 15, 2011 photo, during leisure hours, researchers gather atop nearly two miles of ice, at Summit Station, a remote research site operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation, (NSF), situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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A vein of highly-compacted blue ice runs along the surface of an iceberg shed from the Greenland ice sheet, near Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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Two icebergs press up against each other after being shed from the Greenland ice sheet, near Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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A melting iceberg floats along a fjord leading away from the edge of the Greenland ice sheet near Nuuk, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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A Greenlandic Inuit hunter and fisherman steers his boat past a melting iceberg, along a fjord leading away from the edge of the Greenland ice sheet, near Nuuk, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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A pool of melted ice forms atop Jakobshavn Glacier, at the fringe of the Greenland ice sheet. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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Attached by rope to a waiting helicopter, Arctic researcher Carl Gladish of New York University hammers a steel stake into ice, securing a newly deployed GPS seismometer, or Geopebble, designed to track glacial movement near the edge of the Greenland ice sheet, atop Jakobshavn Glacier, outside Ilulissat, Greenland. The chief researcher, NYU's David Holland, hopes to eventually deploy scores of the devices to help measure ice loss in Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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A fishing boat weaves through icebergs shed from the Greenland ice sheet, near Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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Researcher Brandon Strellis of Georgia Tech exits a small work pod at Summit Station, a remote research site operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation, (NSF), situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's vast white landscape, teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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An iceberg floats in the sea near Qeqertarsuaq, Disko Island, Greenland. Greenland is the focus of many researchers trying to determine how much its melting ice may raise sea levels. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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Liquified glacial ice forms into light-absorbing, turquoise hued melt-pools atop Jakobshavn Glacier, at the fringe of the Greenland ice sheet, July 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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In this July 15, 2011 photo, in a trench dug into the 2-mile-thick Greenland ice sheet, researcher Brandon Strellis of Georgia Tech chemically preserves ice samples at Summit Station, a small research center situated at the heart of the vast ice sheet. Across Greenland's white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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In this July 15, 2011 photo, atop roughly two miles of ice, a small laboratory structure bristles with sensors at Summit Station, a remote research center operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet. Across Greenland's white landscape, small teams of researchers from around the world are searching for clues to the potential effects of global warming on Greenland's ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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This Friday, July 15, 2011 picture shows Liz Morris, 64, of Cambridge University's Scott Polar Research Institute, at Summit Station, a small research facility situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet, days before a month-long, 500-mile research trip via snowmobile. Morris' research trip is funded by Britain's National Environmental Research Council and mounted with the U.S. National Science Foundation's cooperation. In 2003, Queen Elizabeth honored the intrepid Morris with a Polar Medal, given in recognition of distinguished service in Arctic and Antarctic exploration. Three years earlier the monarch inducted her into the Order of the British Empire. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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A melting iceberg floats along a fjord leading away from the edge of the Greenland ice sheet, near Nuuk, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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In this July 18, 2011 photo, floating ice, left over from broken-up icebergs shed from the Greenland ice sheet, nearly cover the seafront in Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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A boat steers slowly through floating ice, left over from broken-up icebergs shed from the Greenland ice sheet, outside Ilulissat, Greenland. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

 Greenland Ice

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Drops of water fall from a melting iceberg near Nuuk, Greenland. Greenland is the focus of many researchers trying to determine how much its melting ice may raise sea levels. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) #

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Chloe Borkett

East of Nowhere

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The frozen conflict zone and ex-Soviet enclave of Trans-Dniester, is a narrow slither of land located along the Eastern Moldovan border – a disputed sovereignty, which for 20 years has been de facto governed but also unrecognized by the UN. This came about in the Soviet Union’s dying days as alarm grew in the Dniester region over growing Moldovan nationalism and the possible reunification of Moldova with Romania. A 1989 law, which made Moldovan an official language added to the tension, and Trans-Dniester proclaimed its secession in September 1990.

So what does it mean to grow up in a country that doesn’t exist? So called independence, was seen by many as a triumph that should have secured a better future, but the PMR government has only made time stand still in this little known region, where its people are subjected to living a poverty stricken, isolated and somewhat entrapped existence. Preserving a deeply Soviet hyper-reality, Lenin continues to stand proud on every town square. Political allegiance to Russia is safely guarded seemingly at a cost to its people as the day-to-day reality of maintaining such cultural and political heritage becomes the complete opposite of preservation. Compared to the west we are spoiled by choice, so what western teenager could imagine living in a landscape absent of entertainment, modern facilities or endless consumer possibilities? Where parental presence is limited, and travel or escape is economically and politically restricted.

To date there has only been a modest response made of the territory. Carrying out an on-going exploration pieces together fragments of history and politics to create a contemporary portrait of the new generation to become a fresh contribution to an under-documented region. Interior spaces and landscapes echo psychological states and social concerns, whilst a non-linear narrative leaves individual stories open to interpretation.

Bio

Chloe Borkett was born in southeast London and has been based in a number of cities around the UK and overseas. After graduating from LCC, she embarked on a 5-year career in the music industry, specializing in online marketing. In early 2003, Chloe retrained as a teacher and moved to Thailand for a period of 3 years.

During her time in Thailand, Chloe had the opportunity to work on various charitable projects. It was here where Chloe began to take photography seriously, cementing her decision to return to the UK to study concerned photography where she is soon to graduate with a degree in documentary photography from the renowned course at Newport School of Art.

With the reoccurring theme of isolation present within all Chloe’s work, subject interests have centered on social issues concerning minority groups and the young, as well as the exploration of underground or alternative cultures.

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Chloe Borkett

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