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NEW ARRIVAL!


BAKUSHOU YOSHIMOTO NO SHINKIGEKI

A true hidden gem, so forgive the long review. Set in Osaka complete with giant mechanical crab and Glico man, our man Kanpei stars in this platform game with variety levels and humour to match the Goemon series. The variety includes remembering which the prettiest girl on Osaka bridge is after they have jostled position for a one up. Or a dance section or ride on roller coaster both requiring fast reflexes. Or playing paper, scissors, stone and tossing a sizzling okonomiyaki pancake at the loser. Or mole bashing or rodeo riding..? The real peaches though come on the samurai themed level: slicing through bamboo mats or fighting attached to a kite. The platform sections are fun too: a walking stick power up turning you into an old man to beat everyone with the stick, or climbing up ninja grappling ropes, or jumping over raging bulls. The variety sections may require a little bit of Japanese knowledge, but are simple to work out through trial and error. Genki doesn't often compare to the seminal Goemon series, but this is real, tear jerking fun.

Publisher: Hudson Soft
Game Type: A Bit Special

Console: PC Engine Super CD ROM

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Arif Iqball

Glimpses of the Floating World

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Outside Japan there is often a misunderstanding about the role of the Geisha and that misunderstanding comes from different literary and movie interpretations/fictionalization by non-Japanese at different points in history. The difficulty also comes from the inability to recognize/accept that female entertainers can exist in cultures without engaging in any form of sexual entertainment.

The historical city of Kyoto, Japan is the true center of this floating world and home to five Kagai (literally flower towns, but specifically, performance districts) where you can see Geishas today. The oldest Kagai dates back to the fifteenth century and the tradition of the Geisha continues in Kyoto in the true manner and spirit as it has historically, where the women take pride in being “women of the mind” versus “women of the body”. By all local/Japanese definitions, these women are living art as well as the pinnacle of Japanese eloquence, good manners, style and elegance and are highly respected in Japanese society as artists. Some of their teachers have been labeled as “Living National Treasures” by the Japanese Government. The “Gei” of the Geisha itself means Art and “sha” means a person. Historically both men and women have been labeled Geisha although that word is seldom used and Geiko and Maiko (Apprentice Geiko) are the more appropriate forms of address.

There has been very little work done to photograph the artistic side of the Geiko and Maiko and my work is an effort to see them as living art and to be able to portray them in both formal and informal settings. Behind the painted face is really a teenager/young woman working very hard through song, dance, music, and witty conversation to make the customers of the tea houses escape from their world of stress to a world of art/humour/relaxation and laughter.

Most of this work was done in Medium Format to enable the viewer to eventually see and feel the larger photograph itself as art and I hope that this broader work can shed a new light to the understanding of the Maiko and Geiko and bring respect to them as artists from the non-Japanese viewer.

 

Bio

Arif Iqball was born in Pakistan in 1964 and has spent a third of his life each in Pakistan, US, and Japan respectively.  His curiosity about the balance between modernity and tradition originally attracted him to Japan and in the process, he completed a Masters Degree in Japanese Studies with an interest in Japanese Literature and the visual aesthetic of old Japanese movies.

An avid travel photographer, he uses a nostalgic lens to find beauty in ordinary life and people and is attracted to traditions and artists who are fading away in this modern world.  When completed, this interim work on the Geiko and Maiko in Kyoto will be presented both as a book, and as an exhibit.

His Japan related photographs have appeared in the Washington Post, Lonely Planet, and in Children books.

He currently lives and works in Tokyo.

 

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