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Original author: 
r_adams

Moving from physical servers to the "cloud" involves a paradigm shift in thinking. Generally in a physical environment you care about each invididual host; they each have their own static IP, you probably monitor them individually, and if one goes down you have to get it back up ASAP. You might think you can just move this infrastructure to AWS and start getting the benefits of the "cloud" straight away. Unfortunately, it's not quite that easy (believe me, I tried). You need think differently when it comes to AWS, and it's not always obvious what needs to be done.

So, inspired by Sehrope Sarkuni's recent post, here's a collection of AWS tips I wish someone had told me when I was starting out. These are based on things I've learned deploying various applications on AWS both personally and for my day job. Some are just "gotcha"'s to watch out for (and that I fell victim to), some are things I've heard from other people that I ended up implementing and finding useful, but mostly they're just things I've learned the hard way.

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Nerval's Lobster writes "Just in case you haven't been keeping up with the latest in five-dimensional digital data storage using femtocell-laser inscription, here's an update: it works. A team of researchers at the University of Southampton have demonstrated a way to record and retrieve as much as 360 terabytes of digital data onto a single disk of quartz glass in a way that can withstand temperatures of up to 1000 C and should keep the data stable and readable for up to a million years. 'It is thrilling to think that we have created the first document which will likely survive the human race,' said Peter Kazansky, professor of physical optoelectronics at the Univ. of Southampton's Optical Research Centre. 'This technology can secure the last evidence of civilization: all we've learnt will not be forgotten.' Leaving aside the question of how many Twitter posts and Facebook updates really need to be preserved longer than the human species, the technology appears to have tremendous potential for low-cost, long-term, high-volume archiving of enormous databanks. The quartz-glass technique relies on lasers pulsing one quadrillion times per second though a modulator that splits each pulse into 256 beams, generating a holographic image that is recorded on self-assembled nanostructures within a disk of fused-quartz glass. The data are stored in a five-dimensional matrix—the size and directional orientation of each nanostructured dot becomes dimensions four and five, in addition to the usual X, Y and Z axes that describe physical location. Files are written in three layers of dots, separated by five micrometers within a disk of quartz glass nicknamed 'Superman memory crystal' by researchers. (Hitachi has also been researching something similar.)"

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There are all kinds of reasons to think that Bitcoin is a joke, and that the value of the bitcoins themselves will ultimately go to zero. It's inherently unstable as a currency, prone to hyperdeflation, has an artificial scarcity, and is subject to hoarding.

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Original author: 
David Storey

  

Flexible box layout (or flexbox) is a new box model optimized for UI layout. As one of the first CSS modules designed for actual layout (floats were really meant mostly for things such as wrapping text around images), it makes a lot of tasks much easier, or even possible at all. Flexbox’s repertoire includes the simple centering of elements (both horizontally and vertically), the expansion and contraction of elements to fill available space, and source-code independent layout, among others abilities.

Flexbox has lived a storied existence. It started as a feature of Mozilla’s XUL, where it was used to lay out application UI, such as the toolbars in Firefox, and it has since been rewritten multiple times. The specification has only recently reached stability, and we have fairly complete support across the latest versions of the leading browsers.

There are, however, some caveats. The specification changed between the implementation in Internet Explorer (IE) and the release of IE 10, so you will need to use a slightly different syntax. Chrome currently still requires the -webkit- prefix, and Firefox and Safari are still on the much older syntax. Firefox has updated to the latest specification, but that implementation is currently behind a runtime flag until it is considered stable and bug-free enough to be turned on by default. Until then, Firefox still requires the old syntax.

When you specify that an element will use the flexbox model, its children are laid out along either the horizontal or vertical axis, depending on the direction specified. The widths of these children expand or contract to fill the available space, based on the flexible length they are assigned.

Example: Horizontal And Vertical Centering (Or The Holy Grail Of Web Design)

Being able to center an element on the page is perhaps the number one wish among Web designers — yes, probably even higher than gaining the highly prized parent selector or putting IE 6 out of its misery (OK, maybe a close second then). With flexbox, this is trivially easy. Let’s start with a basic HTML template, with a heading that we want to center. Eventually, once we’ve added all the styling, it will end up looking like this vertically and horizontally centered demo.


<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
   <meta charset="utf-8"/>
   <title>Centering an Element on the Page</title>
</head>
<body>
   <h1>OMG, I’m centered</h1>
</body>
</html>

Nothing special here, not even a wrapper div. The magic all happens in the CSS:


html {
   height: 100%;
} 

body {
   display: -webkit-box;   /* OLD: Safari,  iOS, Android browser, older WebKit browsers.  */
   display: -moz-box;   /* OLD: Firefox (buggy) */ 
   display: -ms-flexbox;   /* MID: IE 10 */
   display: -webkit-flex;    /* NEW, Chrome 21+ */
   display: flex;       /* NEW: Opera 12.1, Firefox 22+ */

   -webkit-box-align: center; -moz-box-align: center; /* OLD… */
   -ms-flex-align: center; /* You know the drill now… */
   -webkit-align-items: center;
   align-items: center;

    -webkit-box-pack: center; -moz-box-pack: center; 
   -ms-flex-pack: center; 
   -webkit-justify-content: center;
   justify-content: center;

   margin: 0;
   height: 100%;
   width: 100% /* needed for Firefox */
} 

h1 {
   display: -webkit-box; display: -moz-box;
   display: -ms-flexbox;
   display: -webkit-flex;
   display: flex;
 
   -webkit-box-align: center; -moz-box-align: center;
   -ms-flex-align: center;
   -webkit-align-items: center;
   align-items: center;

   height: 10rem;
}

I’ve included all of the different prefixed versions in the CSS above, from the very oldest, which is still needed, to the modern and hopefully final syntax. This might look confusing, but the different syntaxes map fairly well to each other, and I’ve included tables at the end of this article to show the exact mappings.

This is not exactly all of the CSS needed for our example, because I’ve stripped out the extra styling that you probably already know how to use in order to save space.

Let’s look at the CSS that is needed to center the heading on the page. First, we set the html and body elements to have 100% height and remove any margins. This will make the container of our h1 take up the full height of the browser’s window. Firefox also needs a width specified on the body to force it to behave. Now, we just need to center everything.

Enabling Flexbox

Because the body element contains the heading that we want to center, we will set its display value to flex:


body {
   display: flex;
}

This switches the body element to use the flexbox layout, rather than the regular block layout. All of its children in the flow of the document (i.e. not absolutely positioned elements) will now become flex items.

The syntax used by IE 10 is display: -ms-flexbox, while older Firefox and WebKit browsers use display: -prefix-box (where prefix is either moz or webkit). You can see the tables at the end of this article to see the mappings of the various versions.

What do we gain now that our elements have been to yoga class and become all flexible? They gain untold powers: they can flex their size and position relative to the available space; they can be laid out either horizontally or vertically; and they can even achieve source-order independence. (Two holy grails in one specification? We’re doing well.)

Centering Horizontally

Next, we want to horizontally center our h1 element. No big deal, you might say; but it is somewhat easier than playing around with auto margins. We just need to tell the flexbox to center its flex items. By default, flex items are laid out horizontally, so setting the justify-content property will align the items along the main axis:


body {
   display: flex;
   justify-content: center;
}

For IE 10, the property is called flex-pack, while for older browsers it is box-pack (again, with the appropriate prefixes). The other possible values are flex-start, flex-end, space-between and space-around. These are start, end, justify and distribute, respectively, in IE 10 and the old specification (distribute is, however, not supported in the old specification). The flex-start value aligns to the left (or to the right with right-to-left text), flex-end aligns to the right, space-between evenly distributes the elements along the axis, and space-around evenly distributes along the axis, with half-sized spaces at the start and end of the line.

To explicitly set the axis that the element is aligned along, you can do this with the flex-flow property. The default is row, which will give us the same result that we’ve just achieved. To align along the vertical axis, we can use flex-flow: column. If we add this to our example, you will notice that the element is vertically centered but loses the horizontal centering. Reversing the order by appending -reverse to the row or column values is also possible (flex-flow: row-reverse or flex-flow: column-reverse), but that won’t do much in our example because we have only one item.

There are some differences here in the various versions of the specification, which are highlighted at the end of this article. Another caveat to bear in mind is that flex-flow directions are writing-mode sensitive. That is, when using writing-mode: vertical-rl to switch to vertical text layout (as used traditionally in China, Japan and Korea), flex-flow: row will align the items vertically, and column will align them horizontally.

Centering Vertically

Centering vertically is as easy as centering horizontally. We just need to use the appropriate property to align along the “cross-axis.” The what? The cross-axis is basically the axis perpendicular to the main one. So, if flex items are aligned horizontally, then the cross-axis would be vertical, and vice versa. We set this with the align-items property (flex-align in IE 10, and box-align for older browsers):


body {
   /* Remember to use the other versions for IE 10 and older browsers! */
   display: flex;
   justify-content: center;
   align-items: center;
}

This is all there is to centering elements with flexbox! We can also use the flex-start (start) and flex-end (end) values, as well as baseline and stretch. Let’s have another look at the finished example:

figure1.1_mini
Simple horizontal and vertical centering using flexbox. Larger view.

You might notice that the text is also center-aligned vertically inside the h1 element. This could have been done with margins or a line height, but we used flexbox again to show that it works with anonymous boxes (in this case, the line of text inside the h1 element). No matter how high the h1 element gets, the text will always be in the center:


h1 {
   /* Remember to use the other versions for IE 10 and older browsers! */
   display: flex;
   align-items: center;
   height: 10rem;
}

Flexible Sizes

If centering elements was all flexbox could do, it’d be pretty darn cool. But there is more. Let’s see how flex items can expand and contract to fit the available space within a flexbox element. Point your browser to this next example.

figure1.2_mini
An interactive slideshow built using flexbox. Larger view.

The HTML and CSS for this example are similar to the previous one’s. We’re enabling flexbox and centering the elements on the page in the same way. In addition, we want to make the title (inside the header element) remain consistent in size, while the five boxes (the section elements) adjust in size to fill the width of the window. To do this, we use the new flex property:


section {
   /* removed other styles to save space */
   -prefix-box-flex: 1; /* old spec webkit, moz */
   flex: 1;
   height: 250px;
}

What we’ve just done here is to make each section element take up 1 flex unit. Because we haven’t set any explicit width, each of the five boxes will be the same width. The header element will take up a set width (277 pixels) because it is not flexible. We divide the remaining width inside the body element by 5 to calculate the width of each of the section elements. Now, if we resize the browser window, the section elements will grow or shrink.

In this example, we’ve set a consistent height, but this could be set to be flexible, too, in exactly the same way. We probably wouldn’t always want all elements to be the same size, so let’s make one bigger. On hover, we’ve set the element to take up 2 flex units:


section:hover {
   -prefix-box-flex: 2;
   flex: 2;
   cursor: pointer;
}

Now the available space is divided by 6 rather than 5, and the hovered element gets twice the base amount. Note that an element with 2 flex units does not necessarily become twice as wide as one with 1 unit. It just gets twice the share of the available space added to its “preferred width.” In our examples, the “preferred width” is 0 (the default).

Source-Order Independence

For our last party trick, we’ll study how to achieve source-order independence in our layouts. When clicking on a box, we will tell that element to move to the left of all the other boxes, directly after the title. All we have to do is set the order with the order property. By default, all flex items are in the 0 position. Because they’re in the same position, they follow the source order. Click on your favorite person in the updated example to see their order change.

figure1.3_mini
An interactive slideshow with flex-order. Larger view.

To make our chosen element move to the first position, we just have to set a lower number. I chose -1. We also need to set the header to -1 so that the selected section element doesn’t get moved before it:


header {
   -prefix-box-ordinal-group: 1; /* old spec; must be positive */
   -ms-flex-order: -1; /* IE 10 syntax */
   order: -1; /* new syntax */
} 

section[aria-pressed="true"] {
   /* Set order lower than 0 so it moves before other section elements,
      except old spec, where it must be positive.
 */
   -prefix-box-ordinal-group: 1;
   -ms-flex-order: -1;
   order: -1;

   -prefix-box-flex: 3;
   flex: 3;
   max-width: 370px; /* Stops it from getting too wide. */
}

In the old specification, the property for setting the order (box-ordinal-group) accepts only a positive integer. Therefore, I’ve set the order to 2 for each section element (code not shown) and updated it to 1 for the active element. If you are wondering what aria-pressed="true" means in the example above, it is a WAI-ARIA attribute/value that I add via JavaScript when the user clicks on one of the sections.

This relays accessibility hints to the underlying system and to assistive technology to tell the user that that element is pressed and, thus, active. If you’d like more information on WAI-ARIA, check out “Introduction to WAI-ARIA” by Gez Lemon. Because I’m adding the attribute after the user clicks, this example requires a simple JavaScript file in order to work, but flexbox itself doesn’t require it; it’s just there to handle the user interaction.

Hopefully, this has given you some inspiration and enough introductory knowledge of flexbox to enable you to experiment with your own designs.

Syntax Changes

As you will have noticed throughout this article, the syntax has changed a number of times since it was first implemented. To aid backward- and forward-porting between the different versions, we’ve included tables below, which map the changes between the specifications.

Specification versions

Specification
IE
Opera
Firefox
Chrome
Safari

Standard
11?
12.10+ *
Behind flag
21+ (-webkit-)

Mid
10 (-ms-)

Old

3+ (-moz-)
<21 (-webkit-)
3+ (-webkit-)

* Opera will soon switch to WebKit. It will then require the -webkit- prefix if it has not been dropped by that time.

Enabling flexbox: setting an element to be a flex container

Specification
Property name
Block-level flex
Inline-level flex

Standard
display
flex
inline-flex

Mid
display
flexbox
inline-flexbox

Old
display
box
inline-box

Axis alignment: specifying alignment of items along the main flexbox axis

Specification
Property name
start
center
end
justify
distribute

Standard
justify-content
flex-start
center
flex-end
space-between
space-around

Mid
flex-pack
start
center
end
justify
distribute

Old
box-pack
start
center
end
justify
N/A

Cross-axis alignment: specifying alignment of items along the cross-axis

Specification
Property name
start
center
end
baseline
stretch

Standard
align-items
flex-start
center
flex-end
baseline
stretch

Mid
flex-align
start
center
end
baseline
stretch

Old
box-align
start
center
end
baseline
stretch

Individual cross-axis alignment: override to align individual items along the cross-axis

Specification
Property name
auto
start
center
end
baseline
stretch

Standard
align-self
auto
flex-start
center
flex-end
baseline
stretch

Mid
flex-item-align
auto
start
center
end
baseline
stretch

Old
N/A

Flex line alignment: specifying alignment of flex lines along the cross-axis

Specification
Property name
start
center
end
justify
distribute
stretch

Standard
align-content
flex-start
center
flex-end
space-between
space-around
stretch

Mid
flex-line-pack
start
center
end
justify
distribute
stretch

Old
N/A

This takes effect only when there are multiple flex lines, which is the case when flex items are allowed to wrap using the flex-wrap property and there isn’t enough space for all flex items to display on one line. This will align each line, rather than each item.

Display order: specifying the order of flex items

Specification
Property name
Value

Standard
order

Mid
flex-order
<number>

Old
box-ordinal-group
<integer>

Flexibility: specifying how the size of items flex

Specification
Property name
Value

Standard
flex
none | [ <flex-grow> <flex-shrink>? || <flex-basis>]

Mid
flex
none | [ [ <pos-flex> <neg-flex>? ] || <preferred-size> ]

Old
box-flex
<number>

The flex property is more or less unchanged between the new standard and the draft supported by Microsoft. The main difference is that it has been converted to a shorthand in the new version, with separate properties: flex-grow, flex-shrink and flex-basis. The values may be used in the same way in the shorthand. However, the default value for flex-shrink (previously called negative flex) is now 1. This means that items do not shrink by default. Previously, negative free space would be distributed using the flex-shrink ratio, but now it is distributed in proportion to flex-basis multiplied by the flex-shrink ratio.

Direction: specifying the direction of the main flexbox axis

Specification
Property name
Horizontal
Reversed horizontal
Vertical
Reversed vertical

Standard
flex-direction
row
row-reverse
column
column-reverse

Mid
flex-direction
row
row-reverse
column
column-reverse

Old
box-orient

box-direction
horizontal

normal
horizontal

reverse
vertical

normal
vertical

reverse

In the old version of the specification, the box-direction property needs to be set to reverse to get the same behavior as row-reverse or column-reverse in the later version of the specification. This can be omitted if you want the same behavior as row or column because normal is the initial value.

When setting the direction to reverse, the main flexbox axis is flipped. This means that when using a left-to-right writing system, the items will display from right to left when row-reverse is specified. Similarly, column-reverse will lay out flex items from bottom to top, instead of top to bottom.

The old version of the specification also has writing mode-independent values for box-orient. When using a left-to-write writing system, horizontal may be substituted for inline-axis, and vertical may be substituted for block-axis. If you are using a top-to-bottom writing system, such as those traditional in East Asia, then these values would be flipped.

Wrapping: specifying whether and how flex items wrap along the cross-axis

Specification
Property name
No wrapping
Wrapping
Reversed wrap

Standard
flex-wrap
nowrap
wrap
wrap-reverse

Mid
flex-wrap
nowrap
wrap
wrap-reverse

Old
box-lines
single
multiple
N/A

The wrap-reverse value flips the start and end of the cross-axis, so that if flex items are laid out horizontally, instead of items wrapping onto a new line below, they will wrap onto a new line above.

At the time of writing, Firefox does not support the flex-wrap or older box-lines property. It also doesn’t support the shorthand.

The current specification has a flex-flow shorthand, which controls both wrapping and direction. The behavior is the same as the one in the version of the specification implemented by IE 10. It is also currently not supported by Firefox, so I would recommend to avoid using it when specifying only the flex-direction value.

Conclusion

Well, that’s a (flex-)wrap. In this article, I’ve introduced some of the myriad of possibilities afforded by flexbox. Be it source-order independence, flexible sizing or just the humble centering of elements, I’m sure you can find ways to employ flexbox in your websites and applications. The syntax has settled down (finally!), and implementations are here. All major browsers now support flexbox in at least their latest versions.

While some browsers use an older syntax, Firefox looks like it is close to updating, and IE 11 uses the latest version in leaked Windows Blue builds. There is currently no word on Safari, but it is a no-brainer considering that Chrome had the latest syntax before the Blink-WebKit split. For the time being, use the tables above to map the various syntaxes, and get your flex on.

Layout in CSS is only getting more powerful, and flexbox is one of the first steps out of the quagmire we’ve found ourselves in over the years, first with table-based layouts, then float-based layouts. IE 10 already supports an early draft of the Grid layout specification, which is great for page layout, and Regions and Exclusions will revolutionize how we handle content flow and layout.

Flexbox can be used today if you only need to support relatively modern browsers or can provide a fallback, and in the not too distant future, all sorts of options will be available, so that we can use the best tool for the job. Flexbox is shaping up to be a mighty fine tool.

Further Reading

(al)

© David Storey for Smashing Magazine, 2013.

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Original author: 
Jim Rossignol


As Eve trundles towards is tenth anniversary, and I baulk with disbelief that it has really been a decade since I quit PC Gamer and spent the summer playing Eve and Planetside 1, CCP have started rolling out celebratory things, including a fantastic space timeline that illustrates the rich backstory of the game’s universe. I was never particularly invested in Eve’s fiction, but it’s impossible to deny the work that CCP put into it, with an encyclopaedia of short stories and even a few novels.

Ten years! I put in five. You can read about them here. I wish I could go back. I miss you, Statecorp.

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Original author: 
Kevin Smith

Trader Wall Street Computer Screen Bloomberg Terminal Staring Intently Focus

There is a ton of research that tells us using a computer for extended amounts of time is bad for our vision.

There's free app called f.lux that softens the light computer screens emit, helping you look at the screen longer.

And it actually works.

F.lux automatically adjusts your screen's color each evening based on the sunset time in your location. It's perfect for dark environments.

Users can tweak the color based on what type of light is present in a room like candlelight, Tungsten, Halogen, Fluorescent, Daylight, and custom lighting. You can even suspend the feature if you need to see true colors.

We've been using f.lux for a few weeks on a Reina MacBook Pro, and can't imagine going back. The transition is subtle and takes a bit getting used to, but if you use it regularly, your eyes will thank you later.

LED computer screens emit a blue light that f.lux's maker Stereopsis says is bad for us and affects our sleep. The blueish light that comes from LCD screens was designed to be used during the day, but at night our computers can't adjust to a more acceptable temperature.

Here's what a screen looks like with and without f.lux:

f.lux

F.lux is available for Mac, PC, and jailbroken iOS devices.

SEE ALSO: What The Heck Is A Dongle? >

Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

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Faced with the need to generate ever-greater insight and end-user value, some of the world’s most innovative companies — Google, Facebook, Twitter, Adobe and American Express among them — have turned to graph technologies to tackle the complexity at the heart of their data.

To understand how graphs address data complexity, we need first to understand the nature of the complexity itself. In practical terms, data gets more complex as it gets bigger, more semi-structured, and more densely connected.

We all know about big data. The volume of net new data being created each year is growing exponentially — a trend that is set to continue for the foreseeable future. But increased volume isn’t the only force we have to contend with today: On top of this staggering growth in the volume of data, we are also seeing an increase in both the amount of semi-structure and the degree of connectedness present in that data.

Semi-Structure

Semi-structured data is messy data: data that doesn’t fit into a uniform, one-size-fits-all, rigid relational schema. It is characterized by the presence of sparse tables and lots of null checking logic — all of it necessary to produce a solution that is fast enough and flexible enough to deal with the vagaries of real world data.

Increased semi-structure, then, is another force with which we have to contend, besides increased data volume. As data volumes grow, we trade insight for uniformity; the more data we gather about a group of entities, the more that data is likely to be semi-structured.

Connectedness

But insight and end-user value do not simply result from ramping up volume and variation in our data. Many of the more important questions we want to ask of our data require us to understand how things are connected. Insight depends on us understanding the relationships between entities — and often, the quality of those relationships.

Here are some examples, taken from different domains, of the kinds of important questions we ask of our data:

  • Which friends and colleagues do we have in common?
  • What’s the quickest route between two stations on the metro?
  • What do you recommend I buy based on my previous purchases?
  • Which products, services and subscriptions do I have permission to access and modify? Conversely, given this particular subscription, who can modify or cancel it?
  • What’s the most efficient means of delivering a parcel from A to B?
  • Who has been fraudulently claiming benefits?
  • Who owns all the debt? Who is most at risk of poisoning the financial markets?

To answer each of these questions, we need to understand how the entities in our domain are connected. In other words, these are graph problems.

Why are these graph problems? Because graphs are the best abstraction we have for modeling and querying connectedness. Moreover, the malleability of the graph structure makes it ideal for creating high-fidelity representations of a semi-structured domain. Traditionally relegated to the more obscure applications of computer science, graph data models are today proving to be a powerful way of modeling and interrogating a wide range of common use cases. Put simply, graphs are everywhere.

Graph Databases

Today, if you’ve got a graph data problem, you can tackle it using a graph database — an online transactional system that allows you to store, manage and query your data in the form of a graph. A graph database enables you to represent any kind of data in a highly accessible, elegant way using nodes and relationships, both of which may host properties:

  • Nodes are containers for properties, which are key-value pairs that capture an entity’s attributes. In a graph model of a domain, nodes tend to be used to represent the things in the domain. The connections between these things are expressed using relationships.
  • A relationship has a name and a direction, which together lend semantic clarity and context to the nodes connected by the relationship. Like nodes, relationships can also contain properties: Attaching one or more properties to a relationship allows us to weight that relationship, or describe its quality, or otherwise qualify its applicability for a particular query.

The key thing about such a model is that it makes relations first-class citizens of the data, rather than treating them as metadata. As real data points, they can be queried and understood in their variety, weight and quality: Important capabilities in a world of increasing connectedness.

Graph Databases in Practice

Today, the most innovative organizations are leveraging graph databases as a way to solve the challenges around their connected data. These include major names such as Google, Facebook, Twitter, Adobe and American Express. Graph databases are also being used by organizations in a range of fields including finance, education, web, ISV and telecom and data communications.

The following examples offer use case scenarios of graph databases in practice.

  • Adobe Systems currently leverages a graph database to provide social capabilities to its Creative Cloud — a new array of services to media enthusiasts and professionals. A graph offers clear advantages in capturing Adobe’s rich data model fully, while still allowing for high performance queries that range from simple reads to advanced analytics. It also enables Adobe to store large amounts of connected data across three continents, all while maintaining high query performance.
  • Europe’s No. 1 professional network, Viadeo, has integrated a graph database to store all of its users and relationships. Viadeo currently has 40 million professionals in its network and requires a solution that is easy to use and capable of handling major expansion. Upon integrating a graph model, Viadeo has accelerated its system performance by more than 200 percent.
  • Telenor Group is one of the top ten wireless Telco companies in the world, and uses a graph database to manage its customer organizational structures. The ability to model and query complex data such as customer and account structures with high performance has proven to be critical to Telenor’s ongoing success.

An access control graph. Telenor uses a similar data model to manage products and subscriptions.

An access control graph. Telenor uses a similar data model to manage products and subscriptions.

  • Deutsche Telekom leverages a graph database for its highly scalable social soccer fan website attracting tens of thousands of visitors during each soccer match, where it provides painless data modeling, seamless data model extendibility, and high performance and reliability.
  • Squidoo is the popular social publishing platform where users share their passions. They recently created a product called Postcards, which are single-page, beautifully designed recommendations of books, movies, music albums, quotes and other products and media types. A graph database ensures that users have an awesome experience as it provides a primary data store for the Postcards taxonomy and the recommendation engine for what people should be doing next.

Such examples prove the pervasiveness of connections within data and the power of a graph model to optimally map relationships. A graph database allows you to further query and analyze such connections to provide greater insight and end-user value. In short, graphs are poised to deliver true competitive advantage by offering deeper perspective into data as well as a new framework to power today’s revolutionary applications.

A New Way of Thinking

Graphs are a new way of thinking for explicitly modeling the factors that make today’s big data so complex: Semi-structure and connectedness. As more and more organizations recognize the value of modeling data with a graph, they are turning to the use of graph databases to extend this powerful modeling capability to the storage and querying of complex, densely connected structures. The result is the opening up of new opportunities for generating critical insight and end-user value, which can make all the difference in keeping up with today’s competitive business environment.

Emil is the founder of the Neo4j open source graph database project, which is the most widely deployed graph database in the world. As a life-long compulsive programmer who started his first free software project in 1994, Emil has with horror witnessed his recent degradation into a VC-backed powerpoint engineer. As the CEO of Neo4j’s commercial sponsor Neo Technology, Emil is now mainly focused on spreading the word about the powers of graphs and preaching the demise of tabular solutions everywhere. Emil presents regularly at conferences such as JAOO, JavaOne, QCon and OSCON.

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The Evolution of the Emcee: Akala at TEDxSalford

Akala is a renowned English rapper, poet, and journalist. Emerging from London's hip-hop underground, in 2006 Kingslee 'Akala' Daley) won the MOBO 'Best Hip-Hop' award for his debut album "It's Not A Rumour". Since then he has released his second album "Freedom Lasso" and toured extensively in the UK and around the world. He has also found the time to take his own energetic and original workshops all over the country working for clients such as the BBC, London Metropolitan Archives, Times BFI London Film Festival and various schools/youth clubs around the capital. Breaking down the culture of cliché and stereotype that smothers the genre he loves is a major part of the mission he's taken on, and gives impetus to this third album of pointed, perceptive hip hop music from the convention-defying emcee. Akala has performed at various UK festivals including V Festival, Wireless, Glastonbury, Reading and Leeds Festivals, Parklife and Isle of Wight. Credits: Camerawork: Nathan Rae & Team - nathanrae.co.uk Post production: Elliott Wragg - twitter.com Audio restoration : Jorge Polvorinos - jorgepolvorinos.wordpress.com Head of IT and Design Vlad Victor Jiman - twitter.com Intro: Mike Wood - www.completeedits.co.uk twitter.com In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small <b>...</b>
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