Skip navigation
Help

Sadr City

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
(author unknown)

One of the oldest forms of storytelling is that of re-enactment, donning the costumes of the story's subjects, miming their actions, performing a narrative before a live audience. Whether organized by history enthusiasts, government offices, religious groups, or just for fun, military battles and religious events are the most popular subjects for re-enactment. Collected here are recent performances from around the world, covering a few events from the past 2,000 years. [36 photos]

Actors wearing military uniforms of the Hungarian and Austrian Hapsburg dynasty reenact the first stage of the 1849 Battle of Isaszeg, Hungary, on April 6, 2013 during the Isaszeg Historical Days event. The battle was part of the Spring Campaign of the Hungarian Revolution of 1848 between the Austrian Empire and the Hungarian Revolutionary Army. (Peter Kohalmi/AFP/Getty Images)     

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
(author unknown)

Ten Years in Iraq - SADR CITY, BAGHDAD - MARCH 2008: Pieces of scrap metal and boxes mark graves in a makeshift cemetery for victims of sectarian killing, on the eastern outskirts the poor Shia slums of Sadr City. The bodies, shot by Shia militiamen, are collected from a nearby killing ground called al-Sadda, and buried by locals. (Photo by Ghaith Abdul-Ahad/ Reportage by Getty Images). See more iconic images from the Iraq War here.

0
Your rating: None

Ten years ago, the International Labor Organization (ILO) established June 12 as World Day Against Child Labor. The ILO, an agency of the United Nations, says on its website: "Hundreds of millions of girls and boys throughout the world are engaged in work that deprives them of adequate education, health, leisure and basic freedoms, violating their rights." The World Day Against Child Labor was launched as a way to highlight the plight of these children and support governments and social organizations in their campaigns against child labor. [37 photos]

The rough hands of an Afghan child, at the Sadat Ltd. Brick factory, where some children work from 8am to 5 pm daily, seen on May 14, 2010 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Child labor is common at the brick factories where the parents work as laborers, desperate to make more money enlisting their children to help doing the easy jobs. (Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)

0
Your rating: None

SWEATING BEADS
SWEATING BEADS: Beads of perspiration dropped from the face of Spain’s Rafael Nadal during a match against the Czech Republic’s Tomas Berdych at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne, Australia, Tuesday. Mr. Nadal won. (Darren Whiteside/Reuters)

CHALLENGING PUTIN
CHALLENGING PUTIN: Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin instructed a boy during a judo demonstration in Kemerovo, Russia, Tuesday. (Reuters)

MOVING HOUSE
MOVING HOUSE: Workers lifted a Habitat house over a fence from a South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice facility in Columbia, S.C., Monday. Youths at the facility worked with volunteers to build the home for a woman whose son suffers from cerebral palsy. (Gerry Melendez/the State/Associated Press)

A MOCKERY OF JUSTICE
A MOCKERY OF JUSTICE: A demonstrator motioned to a doll bearing the likeness of former dictator Gen. Francisco Franco as he held up a banner of Spanish judge Baltasar Garzon at Madrid’s Supreme Court Tuesday. The judge is being tried for probing alleged atrocities around Spain’s 1936-39 civil war, which brought Mr. Franco to power. (Susana Vera/Reuters)

TEARFUL TESTIMONY
TEARFUL TESTIMONY: Audrey Mabrey wiped tears away as she testified Tuesday in Tampa., Fla., against her husband, Christopher Hanney, who allegedly set her on fire. (Kathleen Flynn/Tampa Bay Times/Zuma Press)

FATHER AND SON
FATHER AND SON: A boy rested next to his father at a hospital after they were wounded in a car bombing in the Sadr City area of Baghdad Tuesday. A series of car bombs exploded in Shiite areas, killing at least nine people and injuring dozens, an interior ministry official said. (Ahmad al-Rubaye/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

TANGLED UP
TANGLED UP: Iceland’s Robert Gunnarsson lay on the ground during a game against Spain at the European Handball Championship in Novi Sad, Serbia, Tuesday. (Laszlo Balogh/Reuters)

0
Your rating: None

Marco Grob for TIME

Ali Abbas, London, July 3, 2011

Yuri Kozyrev is known best for his photographs of conflict—he just won the top award at Visa pour l’Image, the international festival of photojournalism, for his coverage of the Arab Spring. But one of the photographs he’s shot that may have had the most impact is not of a battle, but of a badly burned 12-year-old boy lying in a Baghdad hospital bed, the victim of a misdirected allied bomb during the Iraq war. The picture of Ali Abbas ran in TIME‘s April 14, 2003 issue, generating a flood of media interest in the young Iraqi. Offers came from Canada and Britain to fit him with artificial arms and recover from his wounds, while donations poured into funds set up in his name.

When Kozyrev took the picture eight years ago, he was part of a small, strictly controlled group of journalists the Iraqi government allowed in Baghdad, then still under Hussein’s rule. They were taken to only a few sites, one of which was Abbas’ hospital, to be shown victims of U.S. bombings. “This was the way we could cover it. This was the way they wanted us to see the war,” says Kozyrev. As the journalists were escorted around the hallways, a doctor took Kozyrev’s elbow, pulling him away from the group, to the top floor of the hospital. There, alone with his aunt, was Abbas; asleep, badly burned and unaware that his entire family had been killed.

Kozyrev got off three frames, and talked briefly to the aunt before the doctor took him back to the group. “I was struck by Abbas,” says Kozyrev. “He was suffering. At the time, I don’t think he knew how bad it was.”

“The next day I decided to go to his village,” says Kozyrev, “fill in the details of his story and get confirmation that he was bombed.” With his driver, Kozyrev snuck out of the hotel and headed south out of the city. Stopped once by armed Iraqi soldiers, who let him go once they understood his mission, Kozyrev found the ruins of the farm and an uncle who was looking through the rubble told him about Abbas’ family.

After the photo was published, Kozyrev saw Abbas only once more—at a hospital in Sadr City, where the boy had been moved. When Kozyrev went to check on him, he found a line of journalists waiting to interview Abbas. “He was crying,” says Kozyrev. “By then, he realized what had happened to him.”

In July, for TIME‘s 9/11 commemorative issue, Swiss photographer Marco Grob took Abbas’ portrait in London, while reporter William Lee Adams asked him about his life since the bombing. Abbas, who recently became a UK citizen, talked about hoping to set up a charity for victims of war.

Kozyrev keeps abreast of Abbas’ progress, asking about him through friends in the UK. ”I know he is doing OK,” says Kozyrev. “Or as well has a boy who has been through what he has can be. But people should know he was only one of many wounded kids in the hospital that day.”

To see TIME’s interview with Ali Abbas, click here.

0
Your rating: None