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Photographers around the world looked up to the sky this past weekend to capture the "supermoon." This is the phenomenon when the moon makes its closest approach to Earth, appearing 30 percent brighter and about 14 percent larger than a typical full moon. It occurs about once every 14 months and is technically called a perigee full moon. At 221,823 miles from Earth, the supermoon was a feast for the eyes.-Leanne Burden Seidel (24 photos total)
A cotton candy vendor walks in from of the moon during the Los Angeles Angels' baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates, June 22 in Anaheim, Calif. (Mark J. Terrill/Associated Press)    

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TEDxBend - David Hume Kennerly - Telling the Story in 1/60th of a Second

David Hume Kennerly is a native Oregonian who won the 1972 Pulitzer Prize for his photos of the Vietnam War, was President Gerald R. Ford's personal photographer, and is an Emmy--‐ nominated film producer. American Photo Magazine named him "One of the 100 Most Important People in Photography." He has contributed to Newsweek, Time & Life, and George magazines. His books, Shooter, Photo Op, Seinoff: The Final Days of Seinfeld, Photo du Jour, and, Extraordinary Circumstances: The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford have been must--‐reads in the photo community. He was executive producer and principal photographer of Barack Obama: The Official Inaugural Book. Kennerly is on the Board of Trustees of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation, and the Atlanta Board of Visitors of the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD). His archive is at the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas, Austin. He resides in Santa Monica, California where he's participating in an Egyptian work--‐ release program. In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized <b>...</b>
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make it bounce!

Recently BLITZ was asked about modifying an audio driven flash site we completed a few years ago. In that time, technology on the internet driving rich consumer experiences has shifted from a plugin based platform dominated by Adobe Flash to a reliance on the native capabilities of the browser. This is significant, as it’s now obvious that mobile is the current trend in browsing. The old project utilized flash’s ability to extract sound data from a playing song and displayed an on-the-fly visualization of the data, similar to a visual EQ. This ability does not currently exist in most native JavaScript engines, though it is proposed. It got us thinking whether or not we could get this same effect running on a non-flash mobile browser. Currently IOS doesn’t support the ability to get this data from a sound file. After spending a couple hours thinking through the possibilities, we settled on a solution. We would preprocess the audio file, extracting the sound spectrum data and process that data in the browser.

The jist of the data-extraction process looks like this:

An Air application loads the mp3 file and lets the song play. As it plays, every 100 milliseconds it will grab the sound spectrum and select parts of it to use. Originally we were planning on using all 256 data points from the right channel, but a single 4-minute mp3 file was spitting out an 11 meg JSON file. Obviously this was a tad excessive… So after some tweaking we settled on grabbing 50 data points (every 5 from 0 to 250), which decreased the file size from 11 megs down to 2.5 megs. And trimming the decimal values down to only 3 decimal points (Thank You Nick Vincent for the idea) got it down to 800k, a size we were happy with. At each 100 millisecond marker, we grab the data, and inject it into an object. we use the time in miliseconds as the key (we had to round it to 100 ms) for the object. Once we have the object populated, we then serialize it to JSON and save it as a text file.

Once we had the data it was just a matter of implementation. Drop 50 dots in the DOM, each corresponding do the 50 data points of the sound spectrum, and move them around as the song plays. Implementation can vary, so we didn’t spend any real time cleaning things up for reuse, the purpose was more of a proof of concept. If we were going to get serious about it, we would write a wrapper JS file that you would pass an audio element, and the path to the JSON file. Then you’d hook up your events and let it handle the rest. If anyone has interest in taking this task on please let us know. We’d actually love to build it out time permitting.

You can view the demo here:

http://dino.blitzstaging.com/demos/soundspectrum/

Please note, the demo only works in safari, chrome and IOS (that was the challenge). You could easily rig this to work on firefox, just wasn’t a priority.

And you can get the source here:

https://github.com/dinopetrone/SoundSpectrum

The source has both the air application and a www folder containing the demo. To get the air application running you have to open in flash and build. I didn’t create an actual .air file. You will also have to run sass to compile the css (sorry its just how we do things here at BLITZ)

Coming from the flash world, I was very much sick of sound visualization. So please don’t take this and just create another sound visualizer… that’s lame. If you have any practical use please let me know. Also, one disclamer, all of this needs a good deal of polish. Again, it was just a POC spike.

If you’ve read all the way to the end of this article and are interested in doing work like this, we’re always looking for people to join the technology team. Check out our Careers Page for a list of open positions.

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Actor Logan Cunningham voices Rucks, the narrator of Supergiant Games' Bastion. Creating the character in collaboration with sound director Darren Korb and studio director Amir Rao added new dimensions to a long-standing friendship. The three first met on their neighborhood soccer field and in high school, growing up in San Jose.

The Supergiant sound team is in the running for three VGA awards, with votes currently being accepted on the Spike website. In this interview we hear about the creation of the voice of Rucks from the actor and sound director.


Logan Cunningham at the E3 Expo in Los Angeles

What was it that led you to pursue a career in acting?

Logan Cunningham: When I was in high school I had done some acting with Darren, but I didn't train as an actor while in college. I studied basically everything else. When it came time to graduate Fordham University at Lincoln Center as a journalism and communications student, also studying a lot of English, film and visual arts, I realized that everything I had been studying was leading me back to acting and the theater.

Acting was very difficult, and I liked that. In my life, acting and writing are the two things that I've done that have been the hardest and the most fun. I've been out of college for five years, and have spent a lot of time thinking about being an actor. While I don't go on a ton of auditions, I do whatever comes my way. That was, ironically, how Bastion happened.

Did you feel that your interdisciplinary background was something that helped inform this performance?

LC: Certainly. I think that if you are an actor you should study as many things as you can.

When you began creating the character of Rucks, you had not been thinking of yourself as a voice actor. What preparation was necessary to satisfy the requirements of supplying narration for the game?

LC: Voice-over in general is a technical challenge. It's easier than live action acting, in that you don't have wardrobe or makeup and you can get away with more. Obviously, I would never be cast as Rucks in "Bastion: The Movie." But I can produce his voice.

There are things like diction and speaking clearly that are much more important in voice acting. I wasn't as used to that. The majority of the very early work with Darren was in finding that voice. What made it harder than live acting was never having a whole, completed script to read. I've since learned that this is pretty much the plight of all voice actors in videogames, who generally don't get whole scripts for security reasons.

Lyrics by Greg Kasavin, vocals by Logan Cunningham

Were suggestions you were receiving from writer Greg Kasavin helpful in building the character?

LC: A big influence on the sound of the voice is Ian McShane from Deadwood. Greg would send links to YouTube clips, which was great timing because I had just started getting into the show. In the credits of Bastion, I thank my friend Marcus for lending me his DVDs of the series the summer before, where I developed a huge actor crush on McShane and his voice.

Before Bastion, I had not been comfortable dropping my voice that low. When I was in school I was the kid that the teachers always asked to read out loud, which I hated doing. I was really self-conscious about the deepness of my voice and would pitch it higher in my everyday speech. This was a new thing for me, feeling comfortable in that lower register. And I have Deadwood to thank for that.

What kinds of exercises were you doing in order to capture the right sound for the character?

LC: Before we would start each session I warmed up with a blurb from cereal boxes, film synopses from Netflix envelopes, whatever was around. I did that four times in total: as Daniel Day-Lewis's character Bill the Butcher in Gangs of New York, as Sam Elliot, Al Swearengen from Deadwood, then finally as Rucks, after all that. Doing those three passes, somehow Rucks would come out.

Apart from the mechanics of finding the voice, were there insights into the personality of the character that came from Greg's writing or your own choices as an actor?

LC: The script we used came to us as a Google document, split into six columns. The column next to the lines themselves were pointers from Greg, giving some context. He had written an extensive backstory to Bastion that I was not privy to until the game had been unveiled publicly. I didn't even meet Greg until seven or eight months into it.

From the lines and my own imagination, I sensed that archetype of an aging gunslinger. I got the loneliness and the regret. It was clear to me that he had spent most of his life alone, but also that there was a lot going on with the character. I was eager to read that backstory that Greg had written once I learned of its existence, and once I did I realized that I had been on the right track.

You had in fact grown up with Amir Rao and Darren Korb. How did that relationship form prior to development on this game?

LC: Amir and Darren went to elementary school together and have been friends since they were seven. Amir I met in eighth grade. Almost every season I would play recreational soccer on their school's team, the Cougars. I stopped playing in high school and became a theater kid, but in high school it turned out that Amir and I had a lot of mutual friends in common. The three of us all went to New York for college, and they were the familiar faces that I had in the city. The three of us have stayed friends since.

darrenkorb_santamonica_tn.jpg
Sound director Darren Korb in Santa Monica, California

You've described the genre of Bastion's score as "acoustic-frontier." How did you find a sound for the music score that was unique and fit with the environment that Supergiant was looking to create?

Darren Korb: Early in the process we tried to pin down a tone for the game. I was lucky enough to be involved from the beginning, and stumbled upon "acoustic frontier trip-hop." That was something that everyone seemed happy with, so I was looking for everything to fit that genre as a kind of thematic glue for the game.

Trip-hop uses sampled beats. The juxtaposition of the trippy hip-hop and the frontier acoustic guitar made for a fun mix. World One now has a Byzantine kind of sound, with Middle Eastern and Asian influences here and there. For World Two, I've gone more in the direction of Bayou and Western frontier. Each world has its own musical tone.

The soundtrack's concept of the frontier complements the visual quality of the Bastion sprouting up around the protagonist as you explore. Was the personal context of exploring new territory as independent developers at all informing the decision?

DK: Yeah, part of the idea behind the frontier vibe was to give you the feeling that the world around you wasn't settled. Being an unsettled independent game company, we delved into this project not knowing what was ahead of us.

Are there scores for past games that stood out in your memory at the time of working on the soundtrack for Bastion?

DK: My favorite music score for a game is Marble Madness. I love it so much. Another of my favorites is Dungeon Keeper for the PC, Windows 95. Back in the day I would put the actual Dungeon Keeper game disc in my car and would listen to the music tracks on it. As far as music in games goes, I grew up playing games and they are a big part of my influences, along with bands like Led Zeppelin, the Beatles, Weezer and They Might Be Giants. But before I liked rock music, I liked game music.

Have you found that joining the development team has allowed you to be directly involved in your role as musician?

DK: I love being a part of Supergiant Games. Not only do I get to do something that's incredibly fun, I get to work with friends of mine, who I really get along with. Because it's such a small team, I feel that everything I do has a large effect on the overall project. The soundscape of the game is directly affected by the things that I do. It's nice to feel like I have a stake in the project.

What kind of tone did you feel was right for the character of Rucks, and what do you feel the game gains by having the narration serve as an enduring element of the gameplay?

DK: We did some experimentation, looking at other memorable narrators that we really enjoyed, like Alec Baldwin in the Royal Tennenbaums, or Sam Elliot in the Big Lebowski. We looked at how narration like that fit with the quality of Logan's voice, and started to build the character a bit from the outside in. It started off with the aesthetics of his voice and then became more about who he was and what he was all about.

The narration in this game tells the story in an unobtrusive way that happens while you're playing and it gives context to your actions. During development, I would play levels that didn't have narration on them yet and I kind of had no idea what was happening. When the narration is added, you always know what's going on. You know your objective, and everything has a context.

bastion_01tn-thumb-478x268-987.jpg

What kind of attitude did you want the narrator to have toward the playable character of the Kid?

LC: I knew there was an affection there. Rucks really has no other choice but to like the Kid, because there's no one else around. I think he likes the Kid and sees a lot of himself in him. Fans of the game have theorized that Rucks may in fact be the Kid in a Star Trek-esque causality loop. I never saw it that way myself, but I can see how other people would.

Who was supplying the vocal effects found in the game? It seems like that may have fueled speculation about whether those characters were actually related somehow.

LC: The Kid's exertion sounds are Darren. There are two male Ura at the end of the game, and Darren and I both did the sounds for those.

Additionally, you are singing on the soundtrack. When you were listing the subjects you studied in college, I noticed that vocal performance did not come up. How much background did you have as a singer prior to this game?

LC: Not much. I had been in musicals, though it's the one kind of acting that I'm not particularly fond of doing. When I see it done well, I love it. Darren wrote a musical with his older brother and it was chosen for the New York Theater Festival. There were two performances about a month ago. I was actually their assistant director, stage manager and on-stage briefly in a panda suit.

Singing is something I do reluctantly. I knew going in that they wanted me involved on the soundtrack in some capacity, but I had no idea what it was going to be. The soundtrack came out on a Friday, while I got the song from Darren only the Monday before, and we recorded it on Wednesday. Darren wrote a Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash kind of song, that required a looser, more relaxed kind of singing style forgiving to someone like me, without technical vocal training. We did it in maybe two takes. He had to rewrite the guitar track I was singing over, because it turned out I could sing much lower than he thought I could. We're really happy with how it turned out.

Lyrics by Darren Korb, vocals by Logan Cunningham

The soundtrack has been very well received. It has millions of plays online. That must be gratifying.

LC: Yeah, the number of plays is some insane number. Out of everything about the game, the reception to the sound has surprised us the most. We all knew that Darren writes good music, but witnessing the crazy response to that has been a really nice surprise.

Could you tell us a little about your thoughts on Jen Zee's art style, seen in the game? When you saw Rucks for the first time, was that image something that meshed with your vision of the character?

LC: That was pretty much what I thought he would look like. What I really like about Jen's portrayal of Rucks is that he's a little threatening looking. He's not totally a kindly elder. Like everything she did in Bastion, there's a lot of layers to the look of the character.

There's an edge to it.

LC: Yeah.

What was your experience, having been on the development end for so long, finally playing through the finished product?

LC: I was floored by just how good it was. People sometimes question our "indie-ness" when they see the WB logo, but the truth is that it turned out the way it did because every single one of the seven people who worked on this were amazing at what they did. For those without a background in development, there's a lot of mystery to how a game is made. But, in fact, you can do it, just with labor and a small amount of hardware.

Playing Bastion from start to finish for the first time, I was so proud of it. More than anything else, I was happy for Amir for having pulled it off. When I had heard that he had started his own company with Gavin, it was surprising to me. For most of my life I had known Amir to be a huge gamer, an English major and intellectual. It was therefore a little shocking to discover that he was now an entrepreneur. But he's done it, terrifically.

Your character has popped up in a number of unexpected places outside of Bastion. There was a segment on the Dorkly website, showing Rucks narrating Mario games.

LC: I've seen that video everywhere and I like it. Imitation is the highest form of flattery, or whatever. There seemed to be a lot of people, to my eyes, that thought that was me speaking, which was a little disturbing, but that's fine.

There was also the wedding you narrated.

LC: Yeah, the guy emailed Greg. We were going to be recording anyway, so we thought, "Why not?" Our recording session was actually interrupted by that earthquake that hit New York back in August. We did it, sent it out and then we didn't hear anything. There wasn't even confirmation that the lines had been received, so we left it at that. Then this past Friday, I guess he emailed Ars Technica about it. That was how we found out that he had gone through with it and used the recording for his ceremony.

Do you have thoughts on the potential for working with Supergiant in the future, expanding upon the collaboration so far?

LC: There's enough in the lore to support another Bastion game. I, for one, would love to see a prequel happen. Rucks as a young man, in his hayday, would be an interesting place to go. All I know is that if what Supergiant does next requires a voice that I would be appropriate for, I'll be there.

[Images courtesy of Supergiant Games. For more information on Bastion, see the Supergiant website and soundtrack album. See also our GDC 2011 group chat with Darren Korb and other composers of indie games. Photos by Jeriaska.]

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November 11th marks the 85th Anniversary of one of the most famous highways in America, U.S. Route 66.

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What started in NewYork City in mid September, a call to "flood lower Manhattan, set up tents, kitchens, peaceful barricades and occupy Wall Street," has continued to feed similar groups around the United States taking up the name and cause. Groups have gathered to bring attention to many issues, with a central focus on the economic hardships and inequality they say many Americans face. -- Lloyd Young (35 photos total)
Occupy Boston demonstrators block an entrance to the Federal Reserve Bank behind a police line in Boston Oct. 8. (Michael Dwyer/Associated Press)

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A fan against intense heat for a heart patient... no air conditioning in apartment - SA Texas

Or a few minutes in the swimming pool is ok as long as he stays protected by the sun, 110F - SA Texas 2011

 

Panos Skoulidas

Heat Advisory

assignment

The US drought of 2011 will go down in history as one of the most severe natural disasters in decades. Beyond the financial impacts to farmers and ranchers, there is also a more far reaching impact to the overall quality of life to the inhabitants of the affected regions. As temperatures soar to over 100 degrees day after day for months on end, daily tasks become physical dares made between yourself and the heat. Pets, children, even the young and healthy struggle.

Shane Azar is 43. He is not healthy. Diabetic, overweight and recovering from recent open heart surgery, Shane has become a prisoner to the heat. Doctors have advised him to avoid the scorching sun because of potentially fatal reactions with his medications. His world is limited to the bed, a treasured fan, and a 5 minute daily dip in the pool in an effort to preserve his sanity.

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The Championships, Wimbledon started in 1877 and is the oldest and most prestigious tennis tournament in history. The games played and the players who win on Centre Court have become legends. The tournament is played at The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on grass courts, the games original surface. The Championships start each June, with the Finals taking place on Centre Court in early July. The winners of the Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Singles Final take their place in tennis history as a winner of one of the four tennis Grand Slam tournaments, the others being the US Open, French Open and Australian Open. 2011 total Prize Money is $23.5 million, with $1.77 million each to the men’s and women’s singles champions.

The 2011 tournament Top Men include: No. 1 Rafael Nadal of Spain vs. Michael Russell of the United States, No. 4 Andy Murray of Britain vs. Daniel Gimeno-Traver of Spain, No. 6 Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic vs. Filippo Volandri of Italy, No. 8 Andy Roddick of the United States vs. Andreas Beck of Germany, No. 10 Mardy Fish of the United States vs. Marcel Granollers of Spain.
Top Women include: No. 2 Vera Zvonareva of Russia vs. Alison Riske of the United States, No. 4 Victoria Azarenka of Belarus vs. Magdalena Rybarikova of Slovakia, No. 6 Francesca Schiavone of Italy vs. Jelena Dokic of Australia, No. 15 Jelena Jankovic of Serbia vs. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez of Spain, No. 23 Venus Williams of the United States vs. Akgul Amanmuradova of Uzbekistan.

 A look back at Wimbledon

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American tennis player Ellsworth Vines in play at Wimbledon, London on June 26, 1933. (AP Photo/Staff/Putnam) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Helen Jacobs, left, and Helen Wills Moody, both ot the United States, pose before the start of the women's singles finals match on Centre Court at Wimbledon, England, July 1. The year is not known. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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French tennis player Rene Lacoste, shown in this undated file photo, died at the age of 92 in a hospital at his hometown of St. Jean de Luz, southwestern France, according to his daughter, Sunday, Oct. 13, 1996. Lacoste, who dominated the tennis world in the 1920's and 1930's and created the famed Lacoste sport shirt with the crocodile emblem, won seven major singles titles in his career: Wimbledon twice, the U.S. open twice and the French Open three times. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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General view of the Men's Singles match, on No. 1 Court, at Wimbledon, London, on June 28, 1928, between Britain's Henry W. Austin and American William Cohen. Austin defeated Cohen 6-4, 3-6, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1. (AP) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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French tennis champion Rene Lacoste, left, and England's Henry W. Austin after their Wimbledon Men's Singles Championship match, London, June 30, 1928. Lacoste won the match 6-4, 6-4, 6-8, 1-6, 6-2. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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American tennis star Helen Wills, in action in the semi-final of the Women's Singles Tournament , at Wimbledon, London, on July 4, 1928. Miss Wills defeated fellow American Elizabeth Ryan, 6-1, 6-1. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Jean Borotra in action against H.W. Artens of Austria, in early rounds of Wimbledon championship, in London, England on July 4, 1931. (AP Photo/Len Putnam) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Tennis star Ellsworth Vines is greeted by fans as he arrives home in Pasadena, Calif., Sept. 14, 1932, after winning the Wimbledon and National titles. He is carried on the shoulders of friends at the train station. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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American tennis player Helen Jacobs with the Wightman Cup after the USA beat Britain at Wimbledon, London on June 16, 1934. (AP Photo/Staff/Putnam) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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American tennis player Francis Xavier Shields, Frank Shields, in his match against Henry Wilfred Bunny Austin, unseen, whom he defeated on July 2, 1934, at Wimbledon, London. (AP Photo/Staff/Putnam) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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American tennis player Sarah Palfrey at Wimbledon, London on July 3, 1934 (AP Photo/Staff/Putnam) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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King George V raising his hat to Miss Dorothy Round after she had brilliantly beaten Miss Helen Jacobs in the final of the Women's singles at Wimbledon, London on July 7, 1934, thus regaining yet another tennis title for Britain. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Fred Perry of Britain is shown in action in Wimbledon's Men's Singles at the All England Club in Wimbledon, England, July 3, 1936. Perry defeated Baron Gottfried von Cramm of Germany, 6-1, 6-1, 6-0, winning his third consecutive Wimbledon title. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Britain's Queen Mary, wearing dark glasses watching the tennis from the Royal Box on the Centre Court at Wimbledon, London on June 26, 1939, with her majesty is Sir Samuel Hoare, the British Home Secretary, left, who is also President of the British Lawn Tennis Association. (AP Photo/Staff/Putnam) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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The 1939 Wimbledon tournament started on June 26, with a long programme of Men's Single matches as the opening attractions on all the courts. The weather was unkind to the famous tournament, right, at the start, for low clouds made conditions gloomy in the extreme and rain seemed to threaten at any moment. Roderick Menzel of Germany, in play against E.G. Peters, of Great Britain, in the opening match of the 1939 Wimbledon Tournament on the Centre Court, on June 26, 1939. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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American player Sarah Fabyan, during her match with Mrs. Freda Hammersley, the former Freda James, the British Wightman Cup player, whom she beat 6-2, 6-3, at Wimbledon, London, on June 28, 1939. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Jack Kramer of Los Angeles smashes a return shot during his semi-final round match against Dinny Pails of Australia in the men's singles championship at Wimbledon, July 4, 1947. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Jaroslav 'Jeff' Drobny of Egypt is seen playing a forehand at the center court during his quarter finals match against Sven Davidson of Sweden, who he beat: 7-5; 6-4; 6-0 on June 29, 1953 - the seventh day of play at the All-England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, England, United Kingdom. (AP Photo/Leslie Priest) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Bob Falkenburg, left, and Gardnar Mulloy of the U.S. walk on to the tennis court at Wimbledon for their semi-final match, June 30, 1948. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Gertrude Moran races across Centre Court to make a return shot in third round women's singles match in Wimbledon, England, on June 22, 1949. Moran beat Betty Wilford of Britain, 6-2, 6-4. The American tennis player, from Santa Monica, Ca., wears a short tennis dress with ruffled, lace-trimmed briefs showing below the hem. The tennis outfit, designed and sewn by former tennis player-turned-fashion designer Teddy Tinling, earned her the nickname "Gorgeous Gussie." (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Jaroslav Drobny from Egypt, in play against Budge Patty, U.S.A., at Wimbledon, England, United Kingdom on June 22, 1953 in the men's singles 'Match of the Day'. (AP Photo/Leslie Priest) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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'Little Mo', Maureen Connolly of San Diego, California, left, and Miss Doris Hart of Coral Gables, Florida, who will meet each other in the final of the 67th All-England Lawn Tennis Championships on Saturday, July 4, 1953 are seen together after winning their semi-finals matches at Wimbledon, London, United Kingdom on July 2, 1953. Miss Connolly defeated Miss Shirley Fry, Akron, Ohio: 6-1; 6-1. Miss Hart defeated Mrs. Dorothy Head Knode, Alameda, California; 6-2, 6-2. (AP Photo/John Rider-Rider) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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American athlete Althea Gibson returns to Germany's Edda Buding in the first round of Wimbledon on June 26, 1956. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Althea Gibson, of New York City, slides under the net to return the ball during semi-finals of the women's doubles at the All-England Lawn Tennis Club in Wimbledon, England, July 6, 1956. Britain's Angela Buxton and Gibson defeated Louis Brough, of Beverly Hills, Ca., and Shirley Fry of St. Petersburg, Fla., 7-5, 6-4. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Australia’s Lew Hoad (rear) wipes his face as his countryman Ashley Cooper lies sprawled in front of net after a fall during their all-England lawn tennis championship match at Wimbledon, England on July 5, 1957. Hoad defeated Cooper, 6-2, 6-2 to win the Wimbledon title for the second year straight. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Althea Gibson of New York city, holding the large gold plate presented to her as the winner of the Women's Singles Tennis title at Wimbledon, England, July 6, 1957 is kissed by her finals opponent, Darlene Hard, of Montebello, Calif., (Left). Miss Gibson beat Miss Hard 6-3, 6-2 to become the first African American to win a Wimbledon championship. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Althea Gibson, who won the Wimbledon women's singles and doubles, smiles and waves to the crowd from the backseat of the open car during a ticker-tape parade up Broadway in New York City on July 11, 1957. Gibson, of Harlem, N.Y., is the first black person to win the Wimbledon title. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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The Wimbledon tennis scene was reflected in the sunglasses of this fan. Sarah Miles, 18, was attending the All England lawn tennis championships at the famed courts in London on June 22, 1960. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Billie Jean Moffitt, of Long Beach, Ca., is shown in action against Yola Ramirez of Mexico at the All-England Lawn Tennis championship in Wimbledon, England, June 29, 1961. Ramirez won 11-9, 1-6, 6-2. (AP Photo/Jim Pringle) #

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Billie Jean Moffittt (King), left, 18 of Long Beach, Calif., and Margaret Smith of Australia pose after Miss Moffitt (King) eliminated the top seeded Miss Smith on June 26, 1962 in one of the biggest upsets of the Wimbledon Tennis Championship. Miss Moffitt (King) won the opening day match 1-6, 6-3, 7-5. (AP Photo) #

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31

Arthur Robert Ashe, 19, son of a Richmond, Va., policeman and the first African American ever to play in the Wimbledon, England tennis championships, makes a return during match with Australia's J.B. Hillebrand during the second round of the championships, June 26, 1963. Ashe defeated Hillebrand, 5-7, 7-5, 11-9, 3-6, 6-3. Ashe is a junior at UCLA. (AP Photo) #

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32

Tennis stars at a pre-Wimbledon tennis party held at the Hurlingham Club in London, United Kingdom on June 20, 1965, are from left to right: Carmen Coronado, the Spanish No. 1; Aria Bueno of Brazil, the reigning Wimbledon champion; Helga Schultze of Germany and Madonna Schacht of Australia. (AP Photo/Frank Leonard Tewkesbury) #

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Australian Roy Emerson plays against Mike Sangster of Britain in a second round singles match during the All-England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, June 23, 1965. (AP Photo) #

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Billie Jean King of Long Beach, Ca., is shown in action as she is about to return the ball to Britain's Virginia Wade in the Wightman Cup Tennis tournament in Wimbledon, England on June 10, 1966. King won the match, 6-2, 6-3. (AP Photo) #

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35

Manuel Santana of Spain waits for a return from Dennis Ralston, back to camera, of the United States in their men's singles final at the Wimbledon lawn tennis championships in London, United Kingdom on July 1, 1966. Santana took the title with a 6-4, 11-9, 6-4 win. (AP Photo/Leslie Priest) #

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36

Billie Jean King of Long Beach, Ca., holds up her Wimbledon trophy plate after winning the women's singles title at Wimbledon, England, July 2, 1966. King, who wins her first Wimbledon championship, defeated Maria Bueno of Brazil, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1. (AP Photo) #

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This is a June 1949 photo of American tennis player from Santa Monica, Calif., Gertrude Moran taken in Wimbledon, England. Moran, also known as "Gorgeous Gussie," poses in her lace trimmed panties in her locker during the English women's singles championship at Wimbledon. (AP Photo) #

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38

With the games at 17 all, Pancho Gonzales of America takes a breather and rests on his racket during his Centre Court battle with compatriot Charles Pasarell at Wimbledon on June 24, 1969. Pancho, a long-time Wimbledon favourite, lost the first two sets 22-24: 1-6, but the match is not finished. (AP Photo) #

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Arthur Ashe is seen during the third round of the Men's Singles at Wimbledon, England, June 26, 1969. Ashe beat his opponent, Graham Stilwell of Great Britain, 6-2, 1-6, 6-2, 13-15,12-10. (AP Photo) #

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40

Stan Smith of the United States returns the ball to Ilie Nastase of Romania during first set action at Wimbledon, England, July 9, 1972. Stan went on to win the men's singles final in the All-England Lawn Tennis Club Championships, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3, 4-6, 7-5. Smith is the first American to win the Wimbledon title since 1963. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

41

Reigning Wimbledon Queen Billie Jean King returns volley to Esme Emmanuel of South Africa in U.S. Open tennis action at Forest Hills, New York on Sept. 3, 1972. The Long Beach, Calif., native handily defeated Emmanuel 6-1, 6-3, in the second round match. (AP Photo/Ray Stubblebine) #

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42

Mrs. Billie Jean King, Long Beach, Calif., the Wimbledon's champion, who confirmed last night that there will be no women's boycott of Wimbledon, stretches out on a seat on June 22, 1973 in Kensington Gardens, London after a long night of debate. She is wearing the new fashion in Dacron designed for her for 1973 by Ted Tinling. (AP Photo) #

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43

Sweden's 17-year-old tennis wonder Bjorn Borg, who has accumulated a following of teenage admirers at Wimbledon, England on June 28, 1973, makes a hurling backhand return to West Germany?s Karl Meiler during the center court singles match. Borg won, 6-4, 6-4, 3-6, 2-6,6-3. (AP Photo) #

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44

Sweden's teenage tennis star Bjorn Borg gets an adoring glance from a girl spectator as he packs his tennis racquets after being beaten by Britai'’s top tennis star Roger Taylor in the quarter-final of the Men's Singles of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, United Kingdom, on July 3, 1973. Taylor can be seen in background wearing white shirt. (AP Photo/Bob Dear) #

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45

Mrs. Billie Jean KIng of Long Branch, Calif., right, holds her trophy while 18-year-old Chris Evert of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., looks down at her runners-up medal at Wimbledon, London, July 7, 1973. This is the fifth win for Billie Jean King. (AP Photo) #

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Tennis stars Chris Evert, right, and Jimmy Connors show off their Wimbledon trophies, 1974. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Australia's John Newcombe, a former winner of the Men's singles title at Wimbledon , June 1974. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

48

Indian tennis player Vimay Amritraj in action against Australian Ken Rosewall, during their match in the men's Singles Championship at Wimbledon England, on June 25, 1974. Rosewall won the match 6-2, 5-7: 9-8; 6-1. (AP Photo) #

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49

Bjorn Borg, Sweden's 18-year-old tennis star, is escorted by police and a security guard, right, as he leaves tennis court at Wimbledon, England, June 27, 1974, after defeating Australia's Ross Case. The escort has become necessary to keep Borg from a hovering mass of teenage tennis buffs waiting to descend upon their hero. One autograph seeker is visible, at left, following Borg hopefully. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

50

Rumania's Ilie Nastase clowns with an umbrella, during play in his mens singles championship against Dick Stockton of the United States, at Wimbledon, England. July 2, 1974. Neither the umbrella nor the clowning did Nastase - the number two seed - any good -- he lost. Final scores: 5-7; 6-4; 6-3; 9-8 for a Stockton win. (AP Photo) #

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51

Bjorn Borg, the Swedish teenage champion, crashed out of the Wimbledon Tennis championships in England on July 2, 1974. He was beaten in the men?s singles by Egypt?s unseeded left hander Ismail El Shafei 6-2, 6-3, 6-1. Happy Shafei, left, and dejected Borg walk off after the match. (AP Photo) #

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52

In between sets of the Women's Singles final at Wimbledon, London on July 5, 1974 Olga Morozova of Russia, left, reflects on losing the first set 6-0 and Chris Evert cools off. Chris Evert of the United States defeated Olga Morozova 6-0, 6-4. (AP Photo) #

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Jimmy Connors of Belleville, Ill., is seen in action at Wimbledon during the finals of the men's singles championship against Australian Ken Rosewall, July 6, 1974. (AP Photo/Peter Kemp) #

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54

American tennis player Chris Evert at full stretch during the Ladies Singles final at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London on July 6, 1974 when she defeated Olga Morozova of Russia, unseen, 6-0, 6-4. (AP Photo) #

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55

Wimbledon's Men's Singles champion Jimmy Connors of Belleville, Ill. and his fiance, Women's Singles champion Chris Evert (Fort Lauderdale, Fla) at the Lawn Tennis Association ball at London's Grosvenor House on July 6, 1950. The couple led off the dancing. (AP Photo) #

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56

Ilie Nastase of Romania, clowns as he takes shelter from the sun under a linesman's chair at Wimbledon, England , June 24, 1975 before beating Temuraz Kakulia of USSR in the men's singles championships. Nastase won in three straight sets, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. (AP Photo) #

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57

America's Billie Jean King gets airborne to return a shot from Chris Evert during their ladies single semi-final match on the center court of the All-England club at Wimbledon, London on Wednesday, July 2, 1975. Mrs. King beat Miss Evert 2-6, 6-2, 6-3, to reach the final where she will play Evonne Goolagong Cawley of Australia. (AP Photo) #

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Arthur Ashe, right, shakes hands with his opponent, last year's champion Jimmy Connors, after defeating him in the final match of the men's singles championship at Wimbledon, England, July 5, 1975. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

59

Jimmy Connors dives to return the ball to Arthur Ashe in the final set of the 1975 Wimbledon Men's Tennis Final in London, July 5, 1975. Ashe defeated Connors, 6-1, 6-1, 5-7, 6-4. ( AP Photo/Staff/Caulkin) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

60

Arthur Ashe holds the Gentlemen's Singles Trophy after defeating fellow American Jimmy Conners (6-1, 6-1, 5-7, 6-4) in the final of the men's singles championship at the All England Lawn Tennis Championship in Wimbledon, England, July 5, 1975. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

61

Eighteen-year-old John McEnroe of the United States rests on his knees after falling during his men?s singles semifinal match with countryman Jimmy Connors at Wimbledon on Thursday, July 1, 1977. Connors won the match, 6-3, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, and will go against Bjorn Borg in the final of the all England tennis championship. (AP Photo) #

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62

Jul 1978: Martina Navratilova of Czechoslovakia in action during the Wimbledon ladies singles final against Chris Evert of the USA at the All England Tennis Club in London. \ Mandatory Credit: Tony Duffy /Allsport #

 A look back at Wimbledon

63

Three times Wimbledon champion Fred Perry, aged 68, interviewing Swedish tennis star Bjorn Borg for BBC Television at Wimbledon, England on Thursday, July 6, 1978. Borg, the defending Wimbledon champion, meets Jimmy Connors of the United States in the men?s singles semi-final. (AP Photo/Keith Hammett ) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

64

Sweden's Bjorn Borg goes down on his knees and throws his hands up in the air, as he wins the Men's Singles tennis championship at Wimbledon Saturday, July 8, 1978, for the third consecutive year. Borg defeated Jimmy Connors of the United States 6-2; 6-2; 6-3, to become the second man ever to win the Men's Singles title three times in a row. (AP Photo/Bob Dear) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

65

John McEnroe of the United States gets off the ground, as he hurtles across Wimbledon?s Centre Court in Wimbledon, England on Wednesday, June 27, 1979, in an effort to reach a shot from Britain?s Buster Mottram, during their Men?s Singles second round match. McEnroe went on to win the match 6-7; 6-2; 7-6; 6-2. (AP Photo/Dave Caulkin) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

66

A serious faced Billie Jean King rests her chin in her hand, during a break in her Ladies Singles quarterfinal match against Tracy Austin on Wimbledon's Centre on July 2, 1979. King, six times winner of the championship, was defeated 6-4; 6-7; 6-2, by 16 year-old Austin, who will play defending champion Martina Navratilova in the semi-finals of the tournament. (AP Photo/ Robert Dear) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

67

Billie Jean King, right, is all smiles as she and Martina Navratilova, center, hold the Women's Doubles trophy on Saturday July 7, 1979 at Wimbledon. For King it was a record 20th Wimbledon title and for Martina it was her second championship win in two days. Applauding at left is Britains Duchess of Kent. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

68

Andrea Jaeger of the United States puts her head back and throws up her arm in despair, after missing a shot in her Ladies Singles fourth round match against Britain's Virginia Wade, on Wimbledon's Center Court on June 30, 1980. Despite the missed shot, Jaeger, at fifteen, the youngest ever Wimbledon seed, went on to beat Wade 9-2; 7-6. (AP Photo/Robert Dear) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

69

Sweden's Bjorn Borg, left, and John McEnroe of the United States, walk together after the 1980 Men's Singles Final at Wimbledon, England, July 1980. The two tennis stars are to relive their classic championship finals on the Buckingham Palace tennis court, it was announced in London Thursday, May 25, 2000. They will replay the 1980 and 1981 Centre Court battles at a charity tennis afternoon hosted by Prince Andrew. (AP Photo/PA) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

70

John McEnroe of the United States argues a line call with the umpire, during his Men's Singles semi-final match on Wimbledon's Centre Court on Friday, July 4, 1980 in London, against fellow American Jimmy Connors. McEnroe claimed that he aced Connors, but the umpire-who's decision was upheld - disagreed. (PA Photo) #

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71

Bjorn Borg reacts after defeating John McEnroe to win his fifth consecutive Wimbledon singles championship, July 5, 1980. (AP Photo/Adam Stoltman) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

72

John McEnroe of the United States kicks his racquet into the air, during a stormy outburst on Wimbledon’s number one court, Monday, June 22, 1981, while playing fellow American Tom Gullikson in a Men’s singles first round match. Number two seed McEnrow was given a warning, lost two penalty points, and broke a racquet, before defeating Gullikson 7-6; 7-5; 6-3. (AP Photo/Peter Kemp) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

73

John McEnroe of the United States balances his trophy on his head after winning the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, England, Saturday, July 4, 1981. McEnroe defeated defending champion Bjorn Borg of Sweden, 4-6; 7-6; 7-6; 6-4, in a center court battle that lasted nearly three-and-a-half hours. (AP Photo/Bob Dear) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

74

John McEnroe of the United States clutches his stomach after a fall, tries to turn over, during the Men?s Singles final on Wimbledon?s Centre Court in England on Saturday, July 4, 1981. McEnroe was playing defending champion Bjorn Borg of Sweden. (AP Photo/Bob Dear) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Jun 1982: Chris Evert of the united states plays a two-handed backhand during a match at the 1982 Wimbledon tennis championships. Photo Getty Images #

 A look back at Wimbledon

76

Billie Jean King reacts as she is beaten by Chris Evert Lloyd in a Ladies Singles Championship semi final match at Wimbledon, London on July 2, 1982. Title holder Lloyd won 7-6, 2-6, 6-3 over her American compatriot. (AP Photo/Peter Kemp) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

77

Jimmy Connors, leaps high as he beats title holder John McEnroe, to take the Wimbledon Men's Singles Championship title in London on July 4, 1982. He won 3-6, 6-3, 6-7, 7-6, 6-4. (AP Photo/Bob Dear) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

78

Virginia Wade of Great Britain during her Women's Singles Quarter Final match against Yvonne Vermaak at the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championship on 27th June 1983 at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon in London, England.(Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

79

John McEnroe, of the United States, hurtles through the air to reach a shot from Ivan Lendl during their Men's Singles semi-final match at Wimbledon's center court, England, Friday, July 1, 1983. McEnroe went on to win the match 7-6 (7-5); 6-4; 6-4. (AP Photo/Bob Dear) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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Chris Evert, left, and Martina Navratilova joke with Police Constable Les Bowie on Number Two Court at Wimbledon, England, July 4, 1985. The two American tennis players will next meet in the Wimbledon women's singles final on Saturday, July 6. (AP Photo/Dave Caulkin) #

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81

Boris Becker holds the Wimbledon Singles Tennis Championship trophy on his head after he beat Kevin Curren, of the USA, in the final, July 07, 1985 in Wimbledon. The 17-year-old West German is the youngest ever to win the title. (AP Photo/Bob Dear) #

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82

Britain's Diana Princess of Wales registers a range of emotions, as she watches the Men's Singles, fourth round tennis match between Australia's Pat Cash and Sweden's Mats Wilander, from the Royal Box at Wimbledon's Centre Court, London, June 30, 1986. Cash scored a surprise win over Wilander. (AP Photo/Bob Dear) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

83

Czechoslovakian player Ivan Lendl stretches across Wimbledon's Number One Court, to reach a shot from Tim Mayotte, unseen, during their Men's Singles quarters final match at Wimbledon, London, July 2, 1986. Lendl won the match. (AP Photo/Staff/Caulkin) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

84

Boris Becker yells in celebration after defeating Ivan Lendl in the men's singles final at Wimbledon, July 6, 1986. (AP Photo/Dave Caulkin) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

85

Jun 1987: Martina Navratilova of the USA plays a backhand volley in the Womens' semi-final during the Wimbledon Championships played at Wimbledon, London, England. Allsport UK #

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86

West Germany's Steffi Graf turns away after missing a point against Jana Novotna, during their Women's Singles, fourth round match at Wimbledon, England, June 30, 1987. Graf won the match, and will meet Gabriela Sabatini in the quarter-finals. (AP Photo/Peter Kemp) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

87

American tennis player Jimmy Connors winces as pain killer is applied to his leg by an unidentified trainer, during his Men's Singles, fourth round match against Mikael Pernfors, on the Centre Court at Wimbledon, on July 1, 1987. Connors, 34, battled back from the brink of elimination, to win the match 1-6, 1-6, 7-5, 6-4, 6-2, to reach the quarter finals of the tournament. (AP Photo/Staff/Dear) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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New Champion Stefan Edberg carries his trophy, shown with girlfriend Annette Olsson while leaving Wimbledon on Monday, July 5, 1988. Edberg defeated Boris Becker in the Men's Singles Final to win the Championship for the first time. (AP Photo) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

89

Veteran Jimmy Connors uses his racquet the wrong way up, while clowning on Wimbledon's Centre Court in Wimbledon, London, on June 26, 1989, during his Men's Singles first round match against Andrei Chersakov of the Soviet Union. Connors went on to win the match 6-3, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3 to reach the second round of the tournament. (AP Photo) #

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90

Surrounded by private security guards, America's three-time Wimbledon champion John McEnroe arrives for play against Australian John Fitzgerald in Wimbledon, England, Monday, July 3, 1989 . On Friday, June 30 the American tennis star was allegedly attacked by a man with a aerosol can of air freshener as he left the venue and was later subjected to death threats. (AP Photo) #

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Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia pumps his arms in the air after winning a point against Boris Becker during their Men's Singles semi final match at the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championship on 7th July 1989 at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon in London, England. (Photo by Bob Martin/Getty Images) #

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92

The USA's Andre Agassi tears into a shot from Yugoslavia's Goran Prpic during their second round match at Wimbledon, England, Saturday, June 29, 1991. (AP Photo/Dave Caulkin) #

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93

The USA's John McEnroe pleads with a disinterested line judge during his match with France's Jean-Philippe Fleurian at Wimbledon, England on Sunday, June 30, 1991. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin) #

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94

Andre Agassi dries his tears of joy on the Centre Court at Wimbledon, after defeating Goran Ivanisevic to win the men's singles championship, Sunday, July 5, 1992. Agassi won 6-7 (8-10), 6-4, 6-4, 1-6, 6-4 to capture his first Grand Slam title. (AP Photo/Dave Caulkin) #

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Jun 1993: Boris Becker of Germany flies through the air to volley the winner during a singles match at the Wimbledon Championships in London. \ Mandatory Credit: Chris Cole /Allsport #

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96

Andre Agassi, right, and Germany's Bernd Karbacher sit facing the ends of Wimbledon's Centre Court during a break in their Men's Single match, Monday, June 21, 1993 in Wimbledon. This security measure allows the players to see the crowd, and is a result of Monica Seles' stabbing earlier this year during a tournament in Germany. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin) #

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97

Andre Agassi falls to the ground, after missing a shot from Todd Martin during their Men's Singles, fourth round match on the Centre Court at Wimbledon, Monday, June 27, 1994. Martin won the match 6-3, 7-5, 6-7 (0-7), 4-6, 6-1. (AP Photo/Dave Caulkin) #

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98

Anke Huber of Germany clasps her together to show some emotion during her Women's Singles match against Arantxa Sanchez Vicario during the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championship on 3rd July 1995 at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon in London,England. (Photo by Gary M. Prior/Getty Images) #

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99

Japan's Shuzo Matsuoka lies on Wimbledon's Court 13 as opponent Michael Joyce of the U.S. slumps on his chair after their men's singles fourth round match, Monday, July 3, 1995. Matsuoka won the match 6-3, 6-2, 6-4 to become Japan's first quarter finalist at Wimbledon in 62 years. (AP Photo/Gill Allen) #

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Japan's Ai Sugiyama returns to Germany's Anke Huber, during their Women's Singles, third round match on Wimbledon's Number One Court, Saturday June 29, 1996. Sugiyama, won the match 7-6(7-3), 6-1.(AP Photo/Gill Allen) #

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Pete Sampras of the United States kisses the trophy after winning his Men's Singles Final match against Cedric Pioline at the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championship on 6th July 1997 at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon in London, England.(Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images) #

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4 Jul 1999: Pete Sampras of the United States in commanding form during the Men's Singles Championship Final match against Andre Agassi also of the United States played at the All England Club in Wimbledon, England. The match finished in a comprehensive straight sets victory for Pete Sampras and he went on to equal Roy Emersons record of twelve Grand Slam Singles titles. \ Mandatory Credit: Gary M Prior/Allsport #

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103

US sisters Venus (R) and Serena Williams (L) hold the Ladies' Doubles trophy after winning their final match at the Wimbledon 2000 tennis tournament against Japanese Ai Sugiyama (L) and her French partner Julie Halard-Decugis (L) 10 July 2000. Williams/Williams won the match in 6-3 and 6-2. (GERRY PENNY/AFP/Getty Images) #

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LONDON - JULY 3: Martina Navratilova of USA reacts during her ladies doubles match with Lisa Raymond of USA at the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championship on July 3, 2004 at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in London. Navratilova and Raymond played against Liezel Huber of South Africa and Ai Sugiyama of Japan. (Photo by Phil Cole/Getty Images) #

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LONDON, United Kingdom: Maria Sharapova of Russia serves to Venus Williams of the US during their semi final match at the 119th Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, 30 June, 2005. AFP PHOTO/ADRIAN DENNIS (Photo credit should read ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images) #

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LONDON - JULY 09: Rafael Nadal of Spain returns a shot to Roger Federer of Switzerland during the men's final on day thirteen of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 9, 2006 in London, England. (Photo by Phil Cole/Getty Images) #

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LONDON - JULY 07: Venus Williams of USA hugs the trophy following her victory during the Women's Singles final match against Marion Bartoli of France during day twelve of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 7, 2007 in London, England. Williams won 6-4, 6-1. (Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images) #

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LONDON - JUNE 26: Rafael Nadal of Spain serves during the round two men's singles match against Ernests Gulbis of Latvia on day four of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on June 26, 2008 in London, England. (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images) #

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LONDON - JULY 03: Serena Williams of United States serves during the women's singles Semi Final match against Jie Zheng of China on day ten of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 3, 2008 in London, England. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images) #

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LONDON - JULY 06: Roger Federer of Switzerland congratulates Rafael Nadal of Spain in winning match point and the Championship during the men's singles Final on day thirteen of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 6, 2008 in London, England. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images) #

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WIMBLEDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 27: A general view of the closed roof over Centre Court on Day Six of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on June 27, 2009 in London, England. (Photo by Paul Gilham/Getty Images) #

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Serena Williams celebrates after beating her sister Venus 7-6, 6-2, during their Women's Singles Final of the 2009 Wimbledon Tennis Championships at the All England Tennis Club, in southwest London, on July 4, 2009. AFP PHOTO/CARL DE SOUZA #

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A femail tennis player prepares to serve during a tennis match on the third day of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis Club, in southwest London, on June 23, 2010. AFP PHOTO / GLYN KIRK #

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Spanish player Rafael Nadal returns a ball to French player Paul-Henri Mathieu during the Wimbledon Tennis Championships at the All England Tennis Club, in southwest London on June 28, 2010. AFP PHOTO / GLYN KIRK #

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115

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 29: Venus Williams of USA in action during her Quarter Final match against Tsvetana Pironkova of Bulgaria on Day Eight of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on June 29, 2010 in London, England. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images) #

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LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 04: Rafael Nadal of Spain holds the Championship trophy after winning the Men's Singles Final match against Tomas Berdych of Czech Republic on Day Thirteen of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 4, 2010 in London, England. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images) #

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117

LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 04: Rafael Nadal of Spain holds the Championship trophy in front of the media after winning the Men's Singles Final match against Tomas Berdych of Czech Republic (R) on Day Thirteen of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 4, 2010 in London, England. (Photo by Stefan Wermuth-Pool/Getty Images) #

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LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 13: A general view of play during day one of the Wimbledon Championships 2011 Qualifying on June 13, 2011 in London, England. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images) #

 A look back at Wimbledon

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WIMBLEDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 29: Centre court is seen during the Andy Murray of Great Britain vs Stanislas Wawrinka of Switzerland men's singles fourth round match on Day Seven of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on June 29, 2009 in London, England. The match is played under the closed Centre Court roof. (Photo by Pool/Getty Images) #

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by Claire O'Neill

Memorial Day weekend means different things to different people. Here's a small slice of how the holiday was spent around the country.

Traffic creeps northbound at the start of the Memorial Day holiday weekend Friday in Los Angeles.  More than 35 million people were expected to travel over the weekend.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Traffic creeps northbound at the start of the Memorial Day holiday weekend Friday in Los Angeles. More than 35 million people were expected to travel over the weekend.

A woman walks among crosses at the Arlington West Memorial in Santa Monica, Calif., on Monday. Each red cross stands for 10 lost lives — a sign of the rising toll from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

A woman walks among crosses at the Arlington West Memorial in Santa Monica, Calif., on Monday. Each red cross stands for 10 lost lives — a sign of the rising toll from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

People cool off at John F. Kennedy Plaza, also known as Love Park, in Philadelphia on Monday.
Matt Rourke/AP

People cool off at John F. Kennedy Plaza, also known as Love Park, in Philadelphia on Monday.

President Obama speaks during a Memorial Day service at Arlington National Cemetery on Monday.
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama speaks during a Memorial Day service at Arlington National Cemetery on Monday.

People wait for the start of the Memorial Day Parade in Ansonia, Conn.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

People wait for the start of the Memorial Day Parade in Ansonia, Conn.

 

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Headquartered in Santa Monica, California, Activision is a leading worldwide developer, publisher and distributor of video games. Our company has created, licensed and acquired a group of highly recognizable brands that it markets to a growing variety of consumer demographics. We are seeking individuals who will participate and contribute to our growth, and who will enjoy our fun, dynamic and highly focused business environment.

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