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They keep things out or enclose them within. They're symbols of power, and a means of control. They're canvases for art, backdrops for street theater, and placards for political messages. They're just waiting for when nobody's looking to receive graffiti. Walls of all kinds demarcate our lives. -- Lane Turner (41 photos total).
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Workers clean the curtain wall of the 40-story National Bank of Economic Social Development in Rio de Janeiro on December 12, 2012. (Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images)     

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Simple and efficient, rail travel nonetheless inspires a sense of romance. By train, subway, and a seemingly endless variety of trams, trolleys, and coal shaft cars, we've moved on rails for hundreds of years. Industry too relies on the billions of tons of freight moved annually by rolling stock. Gathered here are images of rails in our lives, the third post in an occasional series on transport, following Automobiles and Pedal power. -- Lane Turner (47 photos total)
An employee adjusts a CRH380B high-speed Harmony bullet train as it stops for an examination during a test run at a bullet train exam and repair center in Shenyang, China on October 23, 2012. (Stringer/Reuters)     

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Original author: 
WSJ Staff

In today’s pictures, family members grieve at a funeral in Texas for a district attorney and his wife, workers cull birds at a poultry market in China, women go to the races in England, and more.

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Original author: 
WSJ Staff

In today’s pictures, children receive treatment at a hospital in Afghanistan, people strike in front of a McDonald’s in New York, a leopard falls into a well in India, and more.

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NYC. From series Darkened Cities by Thierry Cohen

If there wasn’t so much pollution, could we see the stars better at night? Photographer Thierry Cohen shows us what New York City, Rio de Janeiro, Shanghai, and other city skies look like without the smog? His image series also addresses man’s over-consumption, and distant relationship with nature.

Top: New York City.

San Francisco. From series Darkened Cities by Thierry Cohen

San Francisco.

Rio de Janeiro. From series Darkened Cities by Thierry Cohen

Rio de Janeiro.

Shanghai. From series Darkened Cities by Thierry Cohen

Shanghai.

Tokyo. From series Darkened Cities by Thierry Cohen

Tokyo.

Photos © Thierry Cohen

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