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Meghan Lyden

Nepal celebrated the 60th anniversary of the conquest of Mount Everest on Wednesday by honoring climbers who followed in the footsteps of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay. Nepalese officials offered flower garlands and scarfs to the climbers who took part in the ceremony. They were taken around Katmandu on horse-drawn carriages followed by hundreds of [...]

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After cutting a destructive path through the Caribbean, Hurricane Sandy caused extensive damage along the East Coast this week. Sandy made landfall in southern New Jersey and brought with it major flooding, travel disruption, structural damage, and power outages. New York City was especially hard hit. The storm system was so large ­-- nearly 1,000 miles wide at times -- it brought blizzard conditions to West Virginia and 20 foot waves to Lake Michigan. It is projected Sandy will have caused about $30 billion in damages in the United States. To date, the storm claimed more than 100 lives. -- Lloyd Young ( 57 photos total)
Flooded homes in Tuckerton, N.J., on Oct. 30 after Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the southern New Jersey coastline on Oct. 29. (US Coast Guard via AFP/Getty Images)

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When the famous ship hit the infamous iceberg nearly 100 years ago on April 15, 1912, the Titanic didn’t just send hundreds of its passengers to the bottom of the ocean—it also took all the evidence of what life was like on board for the ill-fated travelers.

Or at least it would have, were it not for Francis Browne.

Browne was an Irish Jesuit priest who sailed with the ship for the first leg of its journey, from Southampton, England, to Cobh, Ireland, then called Queenstown. And he would have stayed for the remainder of the transatlantic journey, too, having received an offer of a ticket from a wealthy family he befriended while on board. When Browne reached Cobh, however, he received a note from his clerical superior, ordering him to return to his station immediately rather than sail on.

Browne disembarked. An enthusiastic amateur photographer (who had received his first camera from the same uncle who later bought him his ticket for the Titanic trip), he brought with him the only photos of the Titanic at sea that would survive the shipwreck.

After his near miss, throughout his life as a clergyman, Browne delivered Titanic-themed talks and continued to snap away. His photographs were lost after his death in 1960 and rediscovered by a different priest, Eddie O’Donnell, 25 years later. Among the 42,000-odd negatives, there were more than 1,000 images of the Titanic. O’Donnell edited the images for a book, Father Browne’s Titanic Album, which has been re-released in honor of the shipwreck’s centenary.

Although the camera was his hobby rather than his calling, Browne’s photographs of the Titanic are valuable for more than their content. He is now considered a serious photographer and his work is in the collection of the Irish Picture Library.

And Victoria Bridgeman, CEO of Bridgeman Art Library, the firm that represents the images for licensing purposes, notes that the images are also valuable as embodiments of the age in which they were taken. “They have a fantastic of-the-moment archival quality to them,” she says. “It’s always so exciting when you find something that is totally of its time.”

The photographs, which were used as references during the set design process for the film Titanic, capture both the minutiae of life on an ocean liner—in an exercise room put to good use, in a child at play, in passengers moving over a gangplank—and the grand scale of the ship itself.

“There’s something particularly moving about the collection,” says Bridgeman, recalling how close the images—and their creator—came to going down with the ship, “especially from the perspective of the man who took them.”

Father Browne’s Titanic Album the centenary edition is available through Messenger Editions in Dublin, Ireland

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Families of fallen firefighters attended an annual memorial service that honors the members of the New York City fire department who died in the past year, at the Firemen’s Memorial Monument in Riverside Park on Wednesday. (Ramin Talaie for The Wall Street Journal )


People waited in line for food at Zuccotti Park on Sunday. (Jason Andrew for The Wall Street Journal)


A boy peeked through a picture cutout at Hank’s Pumpkintown in Southampton on Saturday. (Gordon M. Grant for The Wall Street Journal )


Ruby’s Bar & Grill in Brooklyn opened on Thursday morning to a couple of regulars and a pair of tourists. The historic Riegelman’s Boardwalk, which stretches from Coney Island to Brighton Beach, is set to have all its businesses closed down next month. (Natalie Keyssar for the Wall Street Journal)


From left, New York City Museum School ninth-graders Donoven Adams, Odalis Benicio, Ghislaine Farfan and Joseph Vasquez, all 14, took notes during a field trip on Tuesday.  (Natalie Keyssar for the Wall Street Journal)


Two women shared an umbrella as they walked down Sixth Avenue by the Robert Indiana LOVE sculpture in Manhattan on Tuesday. (Natalie Keyssar for the Wall Street Journal)


Handlers with the Big Apple Circus raised the tent in Damrosch Park at Lincoln Center in Manhattan on Wednesday. (Ramin Talaie for The Wall Street Journal )


Taxi dispatcher Winston Whaream, center, talked with Columbia Business School student Matt Gordon, right, and professor Clifford Schorer, at a taxi stand at Kennedy International Airport on Monday. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)


The pizza oven at PizzArte at 69 W. 55th St. in Manhattan (Ramsay de Give for The Wall Street Journal)


Lindsay May Schneider tried to photograph Eva Lambroza, 2, and her brother, Marcus, 4, at Classic Kids Photography in Manhattan on Wednesday. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)


Carmine Puglisi, left, and Sunny Cosovic covered a replica of the Statue of Liberty on Tuesday. The statue, which was cast from the original mold, was being prepared for its formal presentation Wednesday at 667 Madison Ave. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal)


Don Higgins put holiday lights on the trees surrounding Rockefeller Center on Thursday. (Claudio Papapietro for The Wall Street Journal )


Author Jill Kargman loaded bullets into a handgun before shooting at the Westside Rifle and Pistol Range in Manhattan. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal )


Playwright Nicky Silver, outside the Vineyard Theater on 15th Street, where seven of his plays have made their premieres. (Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal )


A 510-foot tower of glass, steel and floating stone masonry, designed by architect Rafael Pelli, is under construction at 4 E. 102nd St. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal )


Ronda Matthews, 40, carried her son, Owen, 3, at the Occupy Wall Street demonstration in Zuccotti Park on Monday. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


A selection of wines at the Terroir wine bar in Murray Hill (Agaton Strom for The Wall Street Journal )

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Hurricane Irene wound up by most estimates as one of the top ten most destructive and deadly hurricanes to hit the United States since 1980. While ultimately not as powerful as many had predicted, the storm still killed at least 27 people along its path from the Caribbean to the eastern seaboard. Transportation was shut down all along the east coast, stranding residents and tourists in shelters, airports, and train stations. More than 5.8 million customers lost electricity, thousands of flights were cancelled, flooding washed out roads and destroyed homes, and evacuation orders were issued for hundreds of thousands. Gathered here are pictures from the Hurricane's path. -- Lane Turner (44 photos total)
Billy Stinson comforts his daughter Erin Stinson as they sit on the steps where their cottage once stood on August 28, 2011 in Nags Head, N.C. The cottage, built in 1903 and destroyed by Hurricane Irene, was one of the first vacation cottages built on Albemarle Sound in Nags Head. Stinson has owned the home, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, since 1963. "We were pretending, just for a moment, that the cottage was still behind us and we were just sitting there watching the sunset," said Erin afterward. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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