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Sarah Stankey

Sasha Tamarin, Untitled, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem

Dagmar Vyhnalkova, Garden of Eden, Oman

Marilyn Lamoreux, Waiting for Spring, Plymouth, MN

Fernando Ramirez, Morning Glory, San Diego, CA

Joey Potter, Possums On A Half Shell, Juliette, GA

Marco Frauchiger, The Last Shuttle, Fort Pierce, FL

Michael Kirchoff, On Patrol, Los Angeles, CA

Gina Rondazzo, Wild #3, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY

Shawna Gibbs, The Entrance, Claremont, NH

Al Palmer, Untitled, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK

David Welch, Draining Chickens, Martha's Vineyard, MA

Christine Pearl, Hula Hoop, Washington DC

Laura Glabman, Untitled, Hewlett, NY

Helen Jones, Punk, Portland, OR

Elizabeth Ellenwood, Backyard Toys #1, Jamaica Plain, MA

Frank Biringer, Untitled (#H08-015), Doha, Qatar

DeAnn Desilets, Fairytale Mysteries, Bethlehem, PA

BK Skaggs, High Summer, Chandler, AZ

Deb Schwedhelm, Sky and Ryder, Tampa, FL

Michael Grace-Martin, Everyday Glam, Ithaca, NY

Elisabetta Cociani, Untitled, Badia, Italy

Ettore Maragoni, Cars, Naples, Italy

John Marshall Mantel, Good fences make good neighbors, Jackson, NJ

Warren Harold, Pool Queue, Houston, TX

Kristianne Koch Riddle, ...he would show me how to play (If I Had A Brother), San Clemente, CA

Jan Garcia, Lazy Afternoon Poolside, Surprise, AZ

Vicki Reed, Potting Shed, Cedarburg, WI

Steve Davis, Near Orland, CA

Bill Chapman, Boston: my backyard, Boston, MA

D Kelly, Springtime Front Yard, NJ

Mark Indig, Chairs, Los Angeles, CA

Lauren Grabelle, Sugar Under the Hammock, Bigfork, MT

Mark Kalan, Lawn Bunnies, Valley Cottage, NY

Bruce Morton, high water boat, Quincy, IL

Mike Whiteley, Rainbow Tree, Lincoln. NE

Suzanne Révy, Weeds, Carlisle, MA

Domenico Foschi, Marissa's Chairs, Whittier, CA

Mark Collins, Cerro Pedernal, Abiquiu, NM

Maggie Meiners, Le Cafe, Winnetka, IL

Deanna Dikeman, Toasting Marshmallows, Sioux City, IA

Adrienne Villar, Buddy, AR

Kati Mennett, Look!, Sandwich, MA

Clare O'Neill, Untitled from the Summertime Fun series, Nambe, NM

Continue to Part Four

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Another year has come and gone and with it hundreds of thousands of images have recorded the world's evolving history; moments in individual lives; the weather and it's affects on the planet; acts of humanity and tragedies brought by man and by nature. The following is a compilation - not meant to be comprehensive in any way - of images from the first 4 months of 2012. Parts II and III to follow this week. -- Paula Nelson ( 64 photos total)
Fireworks light up the skyline and Big Ben just after midnight, January 1, 2012 in London, England. Thousands of people lined the banks of the River Thames in central London to ring in the New Year with a spectacular fireworks display. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

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In a scorching hot community gym in the northern Israeli city of Acre, groups of young Jewish and Arab boys gathered to fight as equals. Boxing, it seems, serves as an unlikely bridge to peace among adversaries.

Associated Press photographer Oded Balilty is no stranger to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict—in fact, his photographic legacy is intertwined in the struggle. After photographing the often violent clashes in Gaza and the West Bank for most of his life, Balilty has begun turning to stories that move beyond the violence—stories that offer glimpses of humanity, cooperation and shared experience.

Balilty’s latest series goes behind-the-scenes of last week’s National Youth Boxing Championship, supported by an organization boasting approximately 2000 active members. Although boxing isn’t a major sport in Israel, it’s favored by many of the roughly 2 million Israeli Arabs in the country, who often face discrimination and other economic hardships.

Within the framework of the sport, Jewish and Arab fighters square off, putting aside the tensions one would expect within a physically brutal sport. The young fighters, clad in helmets and gloves, view each other as equals and are not burdened by the engrained history of conflict outside the ring.

Balilty was drawn to the young age of the children. Many are between 9 and 13, ages where children remain unburdened by the conflicts of their parents. “They are only kids—all they care is to have fun with their friends everyday,” Balilty told TIME, “just like in any other place. It really gives me hope.”

Oded Balilty is a photographer for the Associated Press based in Tel Aviv. LightBox featured his work earlier this year in The Art of Storytelling and The Stone Throwers of Palestine.

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Events celebrating and protesting LGBT rights took place in many parts of the world in the last several months. Pride parades were met with violence or intimidation in Russia, Georgia, and Albania while other places saw wild street parties. Three million people celebrated on the streets of Sao Paulo, Brazil, often considered the biggest Pride event in the world. Activists in Uganda and Chile sought to change laws, while in the United States Barack Obama became the first American president to endorse same-sex marriage. Gathered here are pictures from events related to gay rights issues, LGBT Pride celebrations, and the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia. -- Lane Turner (39 photos total)
Mark Wilson carries a rainbow flag during San Francisco's 42nd annual gay pride parade on June 24, 2012. Organizers said more than 200 floats, vehicles and groups of marchers took part in the parade. (Noah Berger/Associated Press)

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Last week, seven Palestinian men sat for Pulitzer Prize-winning Israeli photographer Oded Balilty in a home in the West Bank village of Bilin. Against a black backdrop, one man posed with a taut slingshot, two small pebbles resting in the sling. Another stared defiantly through a gas mask. A third carried a tire.

Balilty is no stranger to his subject matter. Based in Tel Aviv as an Associated Press photographer for more than a decade, Balilty has photographed daily clashes as well as the longer-term friction between Israelis and Palestinians. In 2007, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his image documenting a lone Jewish settler challenging Israeli security officers in the settlement of Amona.

Although his subject matter is familiar, his portraits transcend the ongoing conflict.

Clad in checkered kaffiyehs, masks and flags, they carry with them the objects of protest used in resistance against Israeli soldiers. Their improvised arsenal of everyday objects echoes the ongoing conflict—a struggle temporarily put on hold while Balilty photographed the men.

“The clashes have been going for years and years and it’s become repetitive, all these clashes every weekend,” Balilty told TIME. “But, this time I said, ok, I want to do something a little bit different. How am I going to show the conflict in a different way?”

He arrived at the idea of shooting portraits, but consulted with his colleague, Nasser Shiyoukhi, the AP’s Palestinian photographer from the West Bank, for help with the access.

“I asked him if it’s even possible for me, as an Israeli,” he said.

Shiyoukhi helped Balilty get in touch with the organizer of the weekly street demonstrations, who gave his consent for the photos to be taken—even arranging for the portraits to be shot inside the organizer’s house in Bilin, a village in the West Bank.

“The Palestinians are definitely not like the Israelis—they are aware of the power of the media. And any exposure for them, in any way, is an opportunity to explain their situation and to talk about the conflict. They are very open minded—they cooperate for a specific reason,” explained Balilty.

Despite the serious nature of the shoot, the atmosphere inside the studio lacked the conflicted tension Balilty expected.

“It’s a very serious issue. But mainly for me, I was trying to focus on the person and to tell like the general story through a few individuals,” said Balilty.

“On the weekend, they are in those protests, but other than that, they are totally normal people—they live normal lives, they go to school, they work, they have families. But yet these guys are always standing on the front lines of the protest and some of them get injured, some of them get arrested, some of them get killed,” he said.

Looking back on the shoot, the photographer was surprised by the way the day turned out.

“At the end of the day, we became like friends. We spent the entire day together, sat together and smoked a cigarette together, and we [shared] some common jokes and it was a very cool day. I wish, you know…it was like that all the time and everywhere. The experience I had that day…for me was one of the best things.”

Oded Balilty is a photographer for the Associated Press based in Tel Aviv. LightBox featured his work earlier this year in The Art of Storytelling.

LightBox updated the story at 3pm Saturday with comments from Oded Balilty. 




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In today’s pictures, lawmakers scuffle in Kiev, the Thai government begins payouts to victims of political violence, a boy competes in a soap box race in California, and more.

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