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Original author: 
Casey Johnston

Casey Johnston

Aereo, a service that streams over-the-air channels to its subscribers, has now spent more than a year serving residents of New York City. The service officially expands to Boston tomorrow and is coming to many more cities over the next few months, including Atlanta and Washington, DC. Aereo seems like a net-add for consumers, and the opposition has, so far, failed to mount a defense that sticks.

But the simple idea behind Aereo is so brilliant and precariously positioned that it seems like we need to simultaneously enjoy it as hard as we can and not at all. We have to appreciate it for exactly what it is, when it is, and expect nothing more. It seems so good that it cannot last. And tragically, there are more than a few reasons why it may not.

A little about how Aereo works: as a resident of the United States, you have access to a handful of TV channels broadcast over the air that you can watch for free with an antenna (or, two antennas, but we’ll get to that). A subscription to Aereo gets you, literally, your very own tiny antenna offsite in Aereo’s warehouse. The company streams this to you and attaches it to a DVR service, allowing you both live- and time-shifted viewing experiences.

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Original author: 
Sean Gallagher

Original photo by Michael Kappel / Remixed by Aurich Lawson

Have a plan to steal millions from banks and their customers but can't write a line of code? Want to get rich quick off advertising click fraud but "quick" doesn't include time to learn how to do it? No problem. Everything you need to start a life of cybercrime is just a few clicks (and many more dollars) away.

Building successful malware is an expensive business. It involves putting together teams of developers, coordinating an army of fraudsters to convert ill-gotten gains to hard currency without pointing a digital arrow right back to you. So the biggest names in financial botnets—Zeus, Carberp, Citadel, and SpyEye, to name a few—have all at one point or another decided to shift gears from fraud rings to crimeware vendors, selling their wares to whoever can afford them.

In the process, these big botnet platforms have created a whole ecosystem of software and services in an underground market catering to criminals without the skills to build it themselves. As a result, the tools and techniques used by last years' big professional bank fraud operations, such as the "Operation High Roller" botnet that netted over $70 million last summer, are available off-the-shelf on the Internet. They even come with full technical support to help you get up and running.

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(author unknown)

Web maps have come a long way. Improved data, cleaner design, better performance, and more intuitive controls have made web maps a ubiquitous and critical component of many apps. They’ve also become one of the mobile space’s most successful transplants as more and more apps are powered by location-aware devices. The core web map UI paradigm itself—a continuous, pannable, zoomable surface—has even spread beyond mapping to interfaces everywhere.

Despite all this, we’ve barely begun to work web maps into our design practice. We create icon fonts, responsive grids, CSS frameworks, progressive enhancement strategies, and even new design processes. We tear down old solutions and build new ones, and even take an extra second to share battle stories in prose and in person. Yet nearly five years since Paul Smith’s article, “Take Control of Your Maps,” web maps are still a blind spot for most designers.

Have you ever taken apart a map? Worked with a map as a critical part of your design? Developed tricks, hacks, workarounds, or progressive enhancements for maps?

This article is a long overdue companion to Paul’s piece. Where he goes on a whirlwind survey of the web mapping stack at 10,000 feet, we’re going to walk through a single design process and implement a modern-day web map. By walking this path, I hope to begin making maps part of the collective conversation we have as designers.

Opinionated about open

Paul makes a strong case for why you might want to use open mapping tools instead of the established incumbent. I won’t retread his reasons here, but I would like to expand on his last: Open tools are the ones we hack best.

There is nothing mysterious about web maps. Take any spatial plane, split it up into discrete tiles, position them in the DOM, and add event handlers for panning and zooming. The basic formula can be applied to Portland, Mars, or Super Mario Land. It works for displaying large street maps, but nothing stops us from tinkering with it to explore galleries of art, create fictional game worlds, learn human anatomy, or simply navigate a web page. Open tools bare the guts of this mechanism to us, allowing us to see a wider range of possibilities.

 character navigation, Mars, and Super Mario Land.
The mechanics of web maps are not limited to street maps.

We should know the conditions under which map images are loaded and destroyed; we should argue whether map tiles are best positioned with CSS transforms or not; and we should care whether vector elements are drawn with SVG or Canvas. Open tools let us know and experiment with these working details of our maps. If you wouldn’t have it any other way with your HTML5, CSS, or JavaScript libraries, then you shouldn’t settle for less when it comes to maps.

In short, we’ll be working with a fully open mapping stack. MapBox, where I work, has pulled together several open source libraries into a single API that we publish under mapbox.js. Other open mapping libraries that are worth your time include Leaflet and D3.js.

Starting out

I’m a big fan of Sherlock Holmes. Between the recent Hollywood movies starring Robert Downey Jr. and the BBC’s contemporary series, I’m hooked. But as someone who has never been to London, I know I’m missing the richness of place and setting that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle meant to be read into his short stories.

A typical approach would be to embed a web map with pins of various locations alongside one of the Sherlock stories. With this approach the map becomes an appendix—a dispensable element that plays little part in Doyle’s storytelling. Instead, we’re going to expand the role of our map, integrating it fully into the narrative. It will set the stage, provide pace, and affect the mood of our story.

Comparing a map used as embedded media versus one used as a critical design element.

A tale of places

To establish a baseline for our tale, I restructured The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans to be told around places. I picked eight key locations from the original text, pulled out the essential details of the mystery, and framed them out with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

Text only demo.
A Sherlock Holmes story in text only. View Demo 1.

  • The story is broken up into section elements for each key location. A small amount of JavaScript implements a scrolling flow that highlights a single section at a time.
  • Our page is not responsive yet, but it contains scaffolding to guard against bad choices that could thwart us. The main text column is fluid at 33.33% and pins to a min-width: 320px. If our content and design flow reasonably within these constraints, we’re in good shape.

Next, we’ll get started mapping. Initially we’ll work on our map separately from our story page to focus on learning key elements of a new technology.

Maps are data

The mapping equivalent of our abridged Sherlock story is a dataset of eight geographic points. GeoJSON, a format for describing geographic data in JSON, is the perfect starting point for capturing this data:

{
    "geometry": { "type": "Point", "coordinates": [-0.15591514, 51.51830379] },
    "properties": { "title": "Baker St." }
}, {
    "geometry": { "type": "Point", "coordinates": [-0.07571203, 51.51424049] },
    "properties": { "title": "Aldgate Station" }
}, {
    "geometry": { "type": "Point", "coordinates": [-0.08533793, 51.50438536] },
    "properties": { "title": "London Bridge Station" }
}, {
    "geometry": { "type": "Point", "coordinates": [0.05991101, 51.48752939] },
    "properties": { "title": "Woolwich Arsenal" }
}, {
    "geometry": { "type": "Point", "coordinates": [-0.18335806, 51.49439521] },
    "properties": { "title": "Gloucester Station" }
}, {
    "geometry": { "type": "Point", "coordinates": [-0.19684993, 51.5033856] },
    "properties": { "title": "Caulfield Gardens" }
}, {
    "geometry": { "type": "Point", "coordinates": [-0.10669358, 51.51433123] },
    "properties": { "title": "The Daily Telegraph" }
}, {
    "geometry": { "type": "Point", "coordinates": [-0.12416858, 51.50779757] },
    "properties": { "title": "Charing Cross Station" }
}

Each object in our JSON array has a geometry—data that describe where this object is in space—and properties—freeform data of our own choosing to describe what this object is. Now that we have this data, we can create a very basic map.

Basic web mapping demo.
The basics of web mapping. View Demo 2.

  • Note that the coordinates are a pair of latitude and longitude degrees. In the year 2013, it is still not possible to find a consistent order for these values across mapping APIs. Some use lat,lon to meet our expectations from grade-school geography. Others use lon,lat to match x,y coordinate order: horizontal, then vertical.
  • We’re using mapbox.js as our core open source mapping library. Each map is best understood as the key parameters passed into mapbox.map():
    1. A DOM element container
    2. One or more Photoshop-like layers that position tiles or markers
    3. Event handlers that bind user input to actions, like dragging to panning
  • Our map has two layers. Our tile layer is made up of 256x256 square images generated from a custom map on MapBox. Our spots layer is made up of pin markers generated from the GeoJSON data above.

This is a good start for our code, but nowhere near our initial goal of using a map to tell our Sherlock Holmes story.

Beyond location

According to our first map, the eight items in our GeoJSON dataset are just places, not settings in a story full of intrigue and mystery. From a visual standpoint, pins anonymize our places and express them as nothing more than locations.

To overcome this, we can use illustrations for each location—some showing settings, others showing key plot elements. Now our audience can see right away that there is more to each location than its position in space. As a canvas for these, I’ve created another map with a custom style that blends seamlessly with the images.

Web map with illustrations.
Illustrations and a custom style help our map become part of the storytelling. View Demo 3, and then read the diff.

  • The main change here is that we define a custom factory function for our markers layer. The job of the factory function is to take each GeoJSON object and convert it to a DOM element—an a, div, img, or whatever—that the layer will then position on the map.
  • Here we generate divs and switch from using a title attribute in our GeoJSON to an id. This provides us with useful CSS classes for displaying illustrations with our custom markers.

Bringing it all together

Now it’s time to combine our story with our map. By using the scroll events from before, we can coordinate sections of the story with places on the map, crafting a unified experience.

Web map coordinated to story text by a scroll handler.
As the user reads each section, the map pans to a new location. View Demo 4, then read the diff.

  • The bridge between the story and the map is a revamped setActive() function. Previously it only set an active class on a particular section based on scrolling position. Now it also finds the active marker, sets an active class, and eases the map to the marker’s location.
  • Map animation uses the easey library in the mapbox.js API, which implements animations and tweening between geographic locations. The API is dead simple—we pass it the lon,lat of the marker we want to animate to, and it handles the rest.
  • We disable all event handlers on our map by passing an empty array into mapbox.map(). Now the map can only be affected by the scrolling position. If users wanted to deviate from the storyline or explore London freeform, we could reintroduce event handlers—but in this case, less is more.

Displaying our fullscreen map together with text presents an interesting challenge: our map viewport should be offset to the right to account for our story on the left. The solution I’m using here is to expand our map viewport off canvas purely using CSS. You could use JavaScript, but as we’ll see later, a CSS-only approach gives us elegant ways to reapply and adjust this technique on mobile devices.

Using an off-canvas map width to offset the viewport center.

At this stage, our map and story complement each other nicely. Our map adds spatial context, visual intrigue, and an interesting temporal element as it eases between long and short distances.

Maps in responsive design

The tiled, continuous spatial plane represented by web maps is naturally well-suited to responsive design. Web maps handle different viewport sizes easily by showing a bit more or a bit less map. For our site, we adjust the layout of other elements slightly to fit smaller viewports.

Adding a responsive layout.
Tweaking layout with web maps. View Demo 5, then read the diff.

  • With less screen real estate, we hide non-active text sections and pin the active text to the top of the screen.
  • We use the bottom half of the screen for our map and use media queries to adjust the map’s center point to be three-fourths the height of the screen, using another version of our trick from Demo 4.

With a modest amount of planning and minimal adjustments, our Sherlock story is ready to be read on the go.

Solve your own case

If you’ve been following the code between these steps, you’ve probably noticed at least one or two things I haven’t covered, like the parameters of ease.optimal(), or how tooltips picked up on the title attribute of our GeoJSON data. The devil’s in the details, so post to this GitHub repository, where you will find the code and the design.

You should also check out:

  • The MapBox site, which includes an overview of tiling and basic web map concepts, and MapBox.js docs and code examples.
  • Leaflet, another powerful open source mapping library.
  • D3.js, a library for powering data-driven documents that has a broad range of applications, including mapping.

This example shows just one path to integrating web maps into your designs. Don’t stick to it. Break it apart. Make it your own. Do things that might be completely genius or utterly stupid. Even if they don’t work out, you’ll be taking ownership of maps as a designer—and owning something is the only way we’ll improve on it.

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Another year has come and gone and with it hundreds of thousands of images have recorded the world's evolving history; moments in individual lives; the weather and it's affects on the planet; acts of humanity and tragedies brought by man and by nature. The following is a compilation - not meant to be comprehensive in any way - of images from the first 4 months of 2012. Parts II and III to follow this week. -- Paula Nelson ( 64 photos total)
Fireworks light up the skyline and Big Ben just after midnight, January 1, 2012 in London, England. Thousands of people lined the banks of the River Thames in central London to ring in the New Year with a spectacular fireworks display. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

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Peter Biddle speaks at the ETech conference in 2007.

Scott Beale

Can digital rights management technology stop the unauthorized spread of copyrighted content? Ten years ago this month, four engineers argued that it can't, forever changing how the world thinks about piracy. Their paper, "The Darknet and the Future of Content Distribution" (available as a .doc here) was presented at a security conference in Washington, DC, on November 18, 2002.

By itself, the paper's clever and provocative argument likely would have earned it a broad readership. But the really remarkable thing about the paper is who wrote it: four engineers at Microsoft whose work many expected to be at the foundation of Microsoft's future DRM schemes. The paper's lead author told Ars that the paper's pessimistic view of Hollywood's beloved copy protection schemes almost got him fired. But ten years later, its predictions have proved impressively accurate.

The paper predicted that as information technology gets more powerful, it will grow easier and easier for people to share information with each other. Over time, people will assemble themselves into what the authors called the "darknet." The term encompasses formal peer-to-peer networks such as Napster and BitTorrent, but it also includes other modes of sharing, such as swapping files over a local area network or exchanging USB thumb drives loaded with files.

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Edutopia.org - Ask kids what Facebook is for, and they'll tell you it's there to help them make friends. And, on the surface anyway, that's what it looks like. Of course, anyone who has poked a bit deeper or thought a bit longer about it understands that people programming Facebook aren't sitting around wondering how to foster more enduring relationships for little Johnny, Janey and their friends, but rather how to monetize their social graphs -- the trail of data the site is busy accumulating about Johnny and Janey every second of the day and night.

After all, our kids aren't Facebook's customers; they're the product. The real customers are the advertisers and market researchers paying for their attention and user data. But it's difficult for them or us to see any of this and respond appropriately if we don’t know anything about the digital environment in which all this is taking place. That’s why -- as an educator, media theorist and parent -- I have become dedicated to getting kids code literate.

Digital World Ownership

As I see it, code literacy is a requirement for participation in a digital world. When we acquired language, we didn't just learn how to listen, but also how to speak. When we acquired text, we didn't just learn how to read, but also how to write. Now that we have computers, we are learning to use them but not how toprogram them. When we are not code literate, we must accept the devices and software we use with whatever limitations and agendas their creators have built into them. How many times have you altered the content of a lesson or a presentation because you couldn't figure out how to make the technology work the way you wanted? And have you ever considered that the software's limitations may be less a function of the underlying technology than that of the corporation that developed it? Would you even know where to begin distinguishing between the two?

This puts us and our kids -- who will be living in a more digital world than our own -- at a terrible disadvantage. They are spending an increasing amount of their time in digital environments where the rules have been written by others. Just being familiar with how code works would help them navigate this terrain, understand its limitations and determine whether those limits are there because the technology demands it -- or simply because some company wants it that way. Code literate kids stop accepting the applications and websites they use at face value, and begin to engage critically and purposefully with them instead.

Otherwise, they may as well be at the circus or a magic show.

More generally, knowing something about programming makes us competitive as individuals, companies and a nation. The rest of the world is learning code. Their schools teach it, their companies are filled with employees who get it, and their militaries are staffed by programmers -- not just gamers with joysticks. According to the generals I've spoken with, we are less than a generation away from losing our technological superiority on the cyber battlefield, which should concern a nation depending so heavily on drones for security and electronic trading as an industry.

Finally, learning code -- and doing so in a social context -- familiarizes people with the values of a digital society: the commons, collaboration and sharing. These are replacing the industrial age values of secrecy or the hoarding of knowledge. Learning how software is developed and how the ecosystem of computer technology really works helps us understand the new models through which we'll be working and living as a society. It's a new kind of teamwork, and one that's under-emphasized in our testing-based school systems.

Codeacademy

To build my own code literacy, I decided to take free classes through the online website Codecademy.com, and ended up liking it so much that I'm now working with them to provide free courses for kids to learn to code. The lessons I've learned along the way are of value to parents and teachers looking to grow more code literate young people.

1. Learning by Doing

One of Codecademy's key insights was that programming is best taught by doing. Where literature might best be taught through books, coding is best taught in an interactive environment. So instead of just giving students text to read or videos to watch, Codecademy invites them to learn to code by actually making code. Every online lesson involves writing lines of code in an interactive window within the web browser, and then hitting the "run" button and watching those lines actually work. Instant payoff, and an "intrinsic reward."

2. A Stake in the Outcome

Code also makes much more sense to people when it is tied to a real project. People need reasons for learning one skill or another. When students are working to devise a computer adventure game, all of a sudden abstract mathematical functions become immediately relevant.

3. Benefits of Interaction

Finally, while badges and point scores are great for motivating students in the short run, social connections to a real group of cohorts probably matter more for the long haul. Codecademy's first strides in that direction, simple forums, allow users to seek out help from others when they're stuck in a lesson. Meanwhile, those who are mastering a skill find it really sinks in when they have the opportunity to explain things to someone encountering it for the first time. Just as research has shown a heterogeneous classroom benefits those on both ends of the aptitude spectrum, interaction between more and less experienced code learners benefits both.

After-School Adventures

The greatest challenge so far, at least from my end, has been figuring out ways to get these interactive lessons into the schools that need them. Between curriculum standards, overworked faculty and legal restrictions on inviting minors to use websites, it's an uphill battle. To help with these challenges, Codecademy has unveiled an after-school program through which any parent or teacher can teach code to a self-selecting group of interested students.

Codecademy.com/afterschool is basically "Codecademy in a box." It's a year of interactive lesson tracks, specially assembled for an after-school group or club run by an adult with no programming experience. In the fall semester, kids make a website by learning HTML and CSS. In the spring, they build an adventure game by learning Javascript. The beauty of the model is that the adult supervising all this needn't know anything about code in advance. The course materials let you know everything you need to stay a week ahead of the kids, and the rest of the online community is there to help you out if you get stuck.

When I learned about the after-school program, I was compelled to tweet, "No Excuses." That's about the best I can say it. The obstacles to code literacy are getting smaller every day, while the liabilities for ignorance are only getting more profound.

What steps are you taking to bring code literacy into your classroom?

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War/Photography, on view from Nov. 11 to Feb. 3, is a magnificent, wide-ranging exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. As chief curator Anne Wilkes Tucker explains in the sumptuous catalogue, that slash in the title is important: this is not a show simply of photographs of war. It’s a demonstration and examination of the relationship between the two and how that relationship has changed over time. There are plenty of images of combat, but the catchment area extends way beyond the battlefield–both in space and in time–to include preparations for war, refugees fleeing its consequences, damage to property and the physical and psychological aftermath of conflict. Taken by some of the most famous photographers—more than 280 are showcased—in the history of the medium, by aerial reconnaissance units and unknown combatants and civilians, the pictures are drawn from the archives of photo agencies such as Magnum, military archives and personal family albums. It’s a stunning show, full of well-known pictures, surprising new ones and—if one consults the catalogue—surprises about well-known pictures.

More than a few of the featured pictures have been either faked or staged. That is to put it too simply, for the slipperiness of the distinction between “real” and “arranged”, or “genuine” and “fake”, turns out to be one of the themes of the show. The problem crops up right from the get-go, with Roger Fenton’s famous pair of pictures of the Valley of Death (1856) from the Crimean war—one of which shows cannonballs strewn more abundantly than the other. (slide #1) The scholarly war over which picture was taken first continues to rage. I thought this question had been definitively settled by Errol Morris in his book Believing is Seeing but John Stauffer argues in the catalogue for precisely the opposite conclusion. The “Dead Rebel Sharp Shooter” in Alexander Gardner’s famous image from the Civil War (slide #2) was dragged to the place where he is seen to have died and arranged in such a way that the rifle — not his own but a prop carried by the photographer — added extra pathos.

As with the Civil War, so in the First World War: it was impossible to take pictures of actual combat. One of the reasons why the famous footage of soldiers going over the top at the Battle of the Somme is faked is because it is on film. Filmed at a training ground, it shows a soldier who is shot, falls down, looks at the camera — and folds his arm before dying. Among the most spectacular images of the war, James Frank Hurley’s “An Episode after the Battle of Zonnebeke” (c.1918) (slide #3) seems like a composite expression of our idea of the Western Front — because, it turns out, it is a composite print made from multiple negatives. As Siegfried Sassoon wrote in his poem “Cinema Hero”: “It’s the truth/That somehow never happened.”

The complexity of Hurley’s image is in stark contrast to Wesley David Archer’s photograph of a pilot who has bailed out of his burning plane (c.1933) (slide #4). It is a picture full of suspense because we don’t know whether the parachute is going to open. What we do now know, courtesy of his widow, is that it was done with a model airplane. Armed with this knowledge you go back to the original and… it still looks amazing! You don’t feel cheated so much as admiring of someone who could create such a truth after (or independent of ) the fact.

Everyone is familiar with the doubts that continue to swirl around Robert Capa’s picture of the “Death of a Loyalist Militiaman” (1936) (slide #5) in the Spanish Civil War. No one can agree on exactly the circumstances in which it was made. And so, ironically, while photography is generally assumed to be strong as evidence but weak in meaning, Capa’s photograph has come to resemble painting, of which the contrary is held to be true. Joe Rosenthal’s image of the flag-raising on Iwo Jima in 1945 is an especially complicated case in that it was widely assumed to have been staged, faked, rigged or something like that, even if we can’t remember exactly what is supposed to have gone on because it’s all a bit muddled up with memories of the Clint Eastwood film about what happened.

The full story, as narrated in the catalogue, is that the flag was raised twice — not for Rosenthal’s benefit but, in the words of the Lieutenant Colonel who ordered it to be done, “so that every son-of-a-bitch on this whole cruddy island (could) see it.” (slide #6) How do we know this is accurate? Because there are photographs – i.e. photographs of the sequence of events that led to Rosenthal taking his photograph – to prove it. (see below) In any case, the success of Rosenthal’s image was due to the way that it not only recorded a moment and event but, in doing so, expressed a truth of enduring – even mythic – proportions about the Marine Corps. The same could be said of Len Chetwyn’s iconic picture from the North Africa (1942) campaign: a photograph which proves, at the most basic level, that this was indeed a battle waged by men in shorts! (not shown). The fact that a detail from it is used on the cover of a beautiful Australian edition of Alan Moorhead’s African Trilogy highlights the way that documentary veracity and imaginative truth are mutually supporting. The surprising thing – which turns out not to be so surprising if we consider how perfectly the picture is composed and lit — is that it’s the photograph that provides the imaginative half of that equation. Smoke grenades had indeed been deployed, but for pictorial effect rather than combat effectiveness.

Louis R. Lowery / Bob Campbell / Bill Genaust — The Museum of Fine Arts Houston

Three examples of photographs that documented the sequence of events leading to Rosenthal's iconic photograph of the flag raising on Iwo Jima.

So there is a delicious irony, in a show that is so scrupulous and judicious in its investigation of the relationship between real and doctored pictures that the catalogue seems, in one instance, to have fallen victim to a booby-trap in its midst. John Filo’s photograph of the killings at Kent State in 1970 shows a distraught woman kneeling over the body of a dead student. Unfortunately it so happened that a pole in the background looked like it was coming out of her head. Since this pole was aesthetically unpleasing, it was removed from the picture as published in Life magazine and elsewhere. Amazingly this clumsily doctored version – you can see quite clearly how the pole has been erased – is the one printed in the War/Photography catalogue! (slide #7)

Courtesy of Jeff Wall

Dead Troops Talk (a vision after an ambush of a Red Army patrol, near
Moqor, Afghanistan, winter 1986), 1992

As we move into the contemporary the distinction between art and documentary becomes increasingly hard to sustain—or to put it the other way around, the No-Man’s Land between the two grows ever larger—as shown in works by color photographer Luc Delahaye (slide #8) and photojournalist Damon Winter’s Gurskey-esque view of a plane-load of troops “Flying Military Class” (slide #9). In Regarding the Pain of Others, Susan Sontag argued that Jeff Wall’s “fictional” image “Dead Troops Talk (a vision after an ambush of a Red Army patrol, near Moqor, Afghanistan)” was among the most successful war photographs of recent times. (note: Wall’s image is not part of the War/Photography exhibition) So perhaps Peter van Agtmael’s well-known shot of a line of U.S. troops sheltering from the downdraft of a helicopter in a rocky grey landscape in Nuristan, Afghanistan, in 2007, works on us powerfully for two reasons. (note: van Agtmael’s image is not part of the War/Photography exhibition) First because a compositional similarity to W. Eugene Smith’s shot of Marines sheltering from an explosion on Iwo Jima in 1945 (slide #10) establishes its place in the heroic and noble tradition of documentary photography. Second, because an uncanny resemblance to Wall’s image tacitly acknowledges that the fictive now sets a standard of authenticity to which the real is obliged to aspire.

Peter van Agtmael—Magnum

An American Blackhawk helicopter lands at the Ranch House, an isolated U.S. outpost in the Waigul Valley of Nuristan Province, near Afghanistan's eastern border with Pakistan, 2007.

The relationship between Wall’s large works and the scale and ambition of history paintings has often been remarked on. But Gary Knight’s picture from Dyala Bridge, Iraq, 2003 (slide #11) achieves an even more remarkable relationship with the art of the past. A photograph taken in the immediate aftermath of fighting, it combines the documentary immediacy and evidential power of the best photojournalism with the epic grandeur of history painting.

Geoff Dyer is an award-winning writer and journalist. See more of his work here.

WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath will open at the Museum of Fine Art Houston on Nov. 11, 2012.  The exhibit will then travel to Annenberg Space for Photography, Los Angeles; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; and Brooklyn Museum through February 2014.

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Events celebrating and protesting LGBT rights took place in many parts of the world in the last several months. Pride parades were met with violence or intimidation in Russia, Georgia, and Albania while other places saw wild street parties. Three million people celebrated on the streets of Sao Paulo, Brazil, often considered the biggest Pride event in the world. Activists in Uganda and Chile sought to change laws, while in the United States Barack Obama became the first American president to endorse same-sex marriage. Gathered here are pictures from events related to gay rights issues, LGBT Pride celebrations, and the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia. -- Lane Turner (39 photos total)
Mark Wilson carries a rainbow flag during San Francisco's 42nd annual gay pride parade on June 24, 2012. Organizers said more than 200 floats, vehicles and groups of marchers took part in the parade. (Noah Berger/Associated Press)

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Seemingly strange weather patterns continue to break high and low temperature records. The same patterns spawned an early tornado season in the midwestern United States and brought late season snowstorms to the west. Record snow falls and frigid temperatures characterized a particularly difficult winter across Europe with many deaths attributed to the conditions. Signs of Spring for the Northern Hemisphere (which began officially with the Vernal Equinox - March 20 - when the hours of day are approximately equal to the hours of night) like trees blossoming and flowers blooming, the shedding of winter coats and the desire of anyone -who has spent an all too long winter season indoors - to venture outside to soak up the sun. -- Paula Nelson (45 photos total)
Cherry blossoms of the Japanese Yoshino variety bloom along the Tidal Basin, March 19, 2012, in Washington, DC, with the Jefferson Memorial to the rear. This season celebrates the 100-year anniversary of the gift of the cherry trees from Japan to Washington, DC. (Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images)

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