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Bradley Manning.

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Over the course of two hours in a military courtroom today, Bradley Manning explained why—and in precise detail, how—he sent WikiLeaks confidential diplomatic cables and "war logs." Bradley's 35-page statement, read over the course of a few hours this afternoon, followed the news that he had pleaded guilty to 10 lesser counts among the many charges against him. The admissions were not part of a plea bargain; Manning still faces trial in June on the most serious charges, such as "aiding the enemy."

The Guardian's Ed Pilkington sets the scene:

Manning was flanked by his civilian lawyer, David Coombs, on one side and two military defence lawyers on the other. Wearing full uniform, the soldier read out the document at high speed, occasionally stumbling over the words and at other points laughing at his own comments.

The American people had the right to know "the true costs of war," Manning said in court today today. He continued:

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google nexus lead

Google's campus in Mountain View is a weird place — a sprawling, flat expanse dotted with angular, gray buildings. And lots of colorful bikes. It feels like an island, a place with its own set of rules, and it's easy to feel out of joint if you don't know the handshake. In some ways it's like a corporate realization of Hakim Bey's Temporary Autonomous Zones... save for, you know, the corporation. It's the kind of place where the uniquely Silicon Valley meshing of childish whimsy and a fervent, quasi-religious work ethic is in full swing. A place where coding ideas and how-tos for relaxation are printed and hung in the men's bathrooms above the urinals. It's charming and bizarre in equal parts.

The last time I had trekked across the...

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ebooks are a new frontier, but they look a lot like the old web frontier, with HTML, CSS, and XML underpinning the main ebook standard, ePub. Yet there are key distinctions between ebook publishing’s current problems and what the web standards movement faced. The web was founded without an intent to disrupt any particular industry; it had no precedent, no analogy. E-reading antagonizes a large, powerful industry that’s scared of what this new way of reading brings—and they’re either actively fighting open standards or simply ignoring them. In part one of a two-part series in this issue, Nick Disabato examines the explosion in reading, explores how content is freeing itself from context, and mines the broken ebook landscape in search of business logic and a way out of the present mess.

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Collusion for Chrome

Disconnect, the team behind privacy extensions like Facebook, Twitter, and Google Disconnect, has traditionally focused on stopping sites from sending your data back to social networks and other collection entities. These sites, however, aren't the only ones getting information from your browsing, and a new Disconnect tool, "Collusion for Chrome," will chart a map of where exactly your clicks are going.

That name ought to sound familiar — it's the same as an experimental Firefox extension that Mozilla created several weeks ago. On Firefox, Collusion opens a new, almost blank tab. As you browse, the tab adds a circle for each site, then sniffs out where that data is going. Within a few clicks, you're likely to have a tangled web linked...

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ioptik

The Pentagon has placed an order for a prototype augmented reality display system that is based on dual focus contact lenses with an expanded field of vision. The system, called iOptik and developed by Innovega, allows the wearer to focus on a HUD at the same time as the surrounding environment by projecting an image onto different sections of the lens. HUD information goes through to the center of the pupil, and light from the wearer's peripheral vision is filtered out to avoid interference. The US military already uses HUDs on the battlefield, but they require bulky equipment and the wearer must actively focus on the information displayed. However, iOptik uses a lightweight eyewear system that doesn't look entirely dissimilar to what G...

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via i.imgur.com

Could all those LOLcats, advice animals, rage comics, and various memes you've spent hours laughing online at actually be a new form of artistic self-expression? After taking a look at things from the perspectives of famous artists and philosophers like Andy Warhol and Aristotle, PBS's Idea Channel thinks so, and discusses why in a truly upvote-worthy video.

"Creating images and sharing them with strangers for the purpose of communicating personal experiences? That my friends, is art."

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The Witness

Game developers aren't in the public eye as much as their contemporaries in film or music, so it's always great when we can get a glimpse at the person behind the game. The Atlantic has done just that with a lengthy profile on Jonathan Blow, the mind behind 2008's Xbox Live Arcade hit Braid and the much-anticipated exploration game The Witness. Blow is known for being outspoken about the games industry and the quality of experiences it produces, and the profile gives some good insight into what he wants games to be and what inspired him during the development of The Witness.

"I don't know what else I would spend money on. So for me, money is just a tool I can use to get things done."

Blow also discusses money, as the success of Braid...

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Open graph

Do the seemingly limitless interaction opportunities provided by social networks like Facebook make us lonelier? It seems contradictory at first, but as Facebook has grown to over 800,000,000 active monthly users, it's a question that has certainly been floated more than once. The Atlantic has just published an in-depth report on the subject that starts with explaining how loneliness has become an epidemic, with more Americans than ever living alone (27 percent) and a staggering 25 percent of Americans in 2010 saying they have no one to confide in — an increase from 10 percent in 1985.

"We were promised a global village; instead we inhabit the drab cul-de-sacs and endless freeways of a vast suburb of information."

How is Facebook...

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