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Original author: 
Cory Doctorow

Journeyman Pictures' short documentary "Naked Citizens" is an absolutely terrifying and amazing must-see glimpse of the modern security state, and the ways in which it automatically ascribes guilt to people based on algorithmic inferences, and, having done so, conducts such far-reaching surveillance into its victims' lives that the lack of anything incriminating is treated of proof of being a criminal mastermind:

"I woke up to pounding on my door", says Andrej Holm, a sociologist from the Humboldt University. In what felt like a scene from a movie, he was taken from his Berlin home by armed men after a systematic monitoring of his academic research deemed him the probable leader of a militant group. After 30 days in solitary confinement, he was released without charges. Across Western Europe and the USA, surveillance of civilians has become a major business. With one camera for every 14 people in London and drones being used by police to track individuals, the threat of living in a Big Brother state is becoming a reality. At an annual conference of hackers, keynote speaker Jacob Appelbaum asserts, "to be free of suspicion is the most important right to be truly free". But with most people having a limited understanding of this world of cyber surveillance and how to protect ourselves, are our basic freedoms already being lost?

World - Naked Citizens (Thanks, Dan!)     

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SmartAboutThings writes "A quite scary talk show with former NSA employees — now whistle blowers — Thomas Drake, Kirk Wiebe, and William Binney reveals that the NSA has algorithms that go through data gathered about us and they can basically 'see into our lives.' And this seems to be going on especially since the Patriot Act has removed the statutory requirement that the government prove a surveillance target under FISA is a non-U.S. citizen and agent of a foreign power." Binney's HOPE keynote has more detail on how the NSA watches people.


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According to projections by the United Nations, the world population has reached 7 billion and continues to grow rapidly.  While more people are living longer and healthier lives, gaps are widening between the rich and the poor in some nations and tens of millions of people are vulnerable to food and water shortages.  There is, of course, the issue of the impact of that sheer number on the environment, including pollution, waste disposal, use of natural resources and food production.  This post focuses on wheat and the effect of our numbers on the environment.  Wheat is the most important cereal in the world and along with rice and corn accounts for about 73 percent of all cereal production.  It isn't surprising that 7 billion people have a lasting impact on our world's natural resources and the environment in which we live. -- Paula Nelson (36 photos total)
One of the world's breadbaskets lies in the prairies of Canada. This stalk, near Lethbridge, Alberta, helps form the foundation for the most important food product in the world: cereal grains. (Todd Korol/Reuters)

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First off, just a little piece of news…I’m happy to announce that I’m now part of Reportage by Getty Images Emerging Talent. Reportage by Getty Images is an agency I greatly admire with some of the top names in our industry, such as Eugene Richards, Shaul Schwarz, and Tom Stoddart, as well as plenty of other great photographers,  and I’m proud to be associated with them through the Emerging Talent.  Big thanks to Patrick Di Nola and Aidan Sullivan for making this happen.  You can see my work on the Reportage site here.

To the updates…

New features from National Geographic Magazine’s upcoming May issue…Jonas Bendiksen follows his April 2010  NGM feature, Tibetan Plateau, about melting glaciers with an essay on Bangladeshis adapting to rising sea levels…

Features and Essays – Jonas Bendiksen: Bangladesh (NGM: May 2011) Adapting to rising sea levels

Also from NGM…

Features and Essays – NGM (various photographers): Yosemite Climbing (NGM: May 2011) A new generation of superclimbers is pushing the limits in Yosemite.

And this…not really my kinda thing usually, but enjoyed this, especially slide 5…

Features and Essays – Abelardo Morell:  Camera Obscura (NGM: May 2011)

Dominic Nahr’s Japan work done on an assignment for TIME magazine, now on Magnum Photos… The photos look better on the Magnum site to me for some reason than they did on Lightbox…eventhough they are smaller…weird…maybe it’s the grey background which makes them pop out…

Features and Essays – Dominic Nahr: The Wave (Magnum: April 2011) The Wave documents the local populations within tsunami landscape in Japan

Stunning work…

Features and Essays – Ed Ou: In Libya, ‘Life Goes On in Its Own Way’ (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Quality…

Features and Essays - Robert Nickelsberg: Parris Island Marines (Reportage by Getty Images: April 2011)

Great stories…

Articles / Features and Essays – Guardian: The photographic collection of John G Morris (Guardian: April 2011)

Photo: Pieter Hugo

Articles / Interviews – Guardian: Under South Africa’s skin: contemporary photography at V&A – audio slideshow (Guardian: April 2011) South African photographers Jodi Bieber, Pieter Hugo and Graeme Williams discuss their work, which features in a vibrant new exhibition at the V&A, Figures & Fictions: Contemporary South African Photography

Features and Essays - Richard Barnes: Photos of a New Kazakhstan (New Yorker Photo Booth: April 2011)

Features and Essays – David Guttenfelder: Conveying the Sadness in Japan’s Stoicism (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Features and Essays – David Guttenfelder: Japan Earthquake Abandoned Community (Oregonlive.com: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Jake Price: One month after the tsunami (BBC: April 2011)

Hipsta feature on Newsweek…

Features and Essays - Teru Kuwayama: Inside Francis Fukuyama’s Mind and Home (Newsweek: April 2011)

Also from Newsweek…

Features and Essays - Michael Zumstein: Ivory Coast Civil War: On the Streets (Newsweek: April 2011)

Ben Lowy’s hipstas from Libya were featured on PDN Photo of they Day…

Features and Essays – Ben Lowy: Libya (PDN Photo of the day: April 2011) iPhone photos

Features and Essays - Franco Pagetti: The Rebels (VII Magazine: April 2011) Libya

Also from VII Magazine…multimedia… The Cult of Gaddafi by Christopher Morris

Angelos Tzortzinis got in touch..He has updated his website with recent work from Libya.

Panos Pictures have Tom Pilston’s The Sunday Times Magazine 13 March 2011 cover feature about Al Jazeera on their website…

Features and Essays - Tom Pilston: Qatar’s Calling (Panos: April 2011) The rise of Al Jazeera

Features and Essays – Andew McConnell: The Faces and Voices of Western Sahara (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Bryan Denton seems to in Libya for NYT at the moment, but I noticed WSJ DoP Jack Van Antwerp tweet a link to this Aghanistan feature by Bryan from early April…

Features and Essays – Bryan Denton: Marines Rally Around Friend (WSJ: April 2011) Afghanistan

Features and Essays - Kendrick Brinson: Amortality (TIME: April 2011) TIME commissioned Kendrick Brinson to visit Cenegenics, an age management practice in Las Vegas, and spend the weekend with residents in retirement communities Sun City, AZ and Sun City Shadow Hills, CA .

Features and Essays - Joel Meyerowitz: Wild City: NYC’s Surprising Parks (Life.com: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Peter Power: The trials of Nunavut: Lament for an Arctic nation (Globe and Mail: April 2011) Article | Power’s website

Features and Essays - Gregg Segal: Why They Fight: Civil War Re-enactors and the Battle over Historic Sites (TIME LB: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Gerd Ludwig: Chernobyl Tourism (Institute: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Hin Chua: Ephemeral Paradise, in Medium Format (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Kael Alford: After the BP spill (FT: April 2011)

Features and Essays - Susan Falzone: The Life And Death Of A Connecticut Community (NPR Picture Show: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Julie Turkewitz: In Mississippi, Scarred But Strong (Housingworks.org: 2011) For people living with HIV in Mississippi, the stigma surrounding the disease is often more frightening than the disease itself.

Features and Essays – Quinn Mattingly: Ben San Leprosy Center, Vietnam (Photographer’s website: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Jim Lo Scalzo: Salton Sea (NYT Lens: April 2011)

David Alan Harvey interviews Alec Soth on Burn Magazine…

InterviewsAlec Soth (burn: April 2011)

“You don’t understand. This is history. I have to photograph it now. Later is too late.” – Lynsey Addario

Interviews - Lynsey Addario : Back From the Brink (American Society of Cinematographers Blog: April 2011)

Interviews – Dan Winters part 1 | part 2 | part 3 (A Photo Editor: April 2011)

Two photographers who went to Fukushima….

Interviews –  Athit Perawongmetha documents the ghost town left behind by the nuclear crisis in Japan. What he found was a “time stop.” (CNN: April 2011)

InterviewsDonald Weber :  Images from the ‘exclusion zone’ surrounding the Fukushima nuclear plan (Globe and Mail: April 2011)

InterviewsAndrea Morales (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Nuru Project are organising an auction to benefit Japan quake communities

FundraisingWa Photography Auction (Nuru Project: April 2011) :  Auction featured on TIME Lightbox : Auction page on FB

InterviewsJoe Raedle : Captured photographer to UM students: You must have passion to tell the story (Miami Herald: April 2011)

InterviewsMarvi Lacar (Ny1.com: April 2011)

Articles – PDN: Miroslav Tichy, Subversive Photographer and Voyeur, Dies at 84 (PDN: April 2011)

Crowd funding – Emphas.is: $50K pledged, 2 projects funded in Emphas.is’ first month (Emphas.is: April 2011)

Articles – TIME: Emphas.is Crowdfunding for Photojournalists: From the Series Photojournalism at the Crossroads (TIME LB: April 2011)

GrantsGetty Images to offer $100,000 in editorial grants

AwardsCanon/AFJ Female Photojournalist Award

AwardsThe Emerging Photographer Bursary Award (for UK residents)

Articles – BJP: Matt Cardy, a Getty Images photographer, has won Photographer of the Year at the 2010 Press Awards (BJP: April 2011)

Articles – PDN: Aftermath Project Announces Winners of Special Grant (PDN: April 2011)

Features and Essays/ Exhibitions – FT: The Rolling Stones in pictures (FT: April 2011) An exhibition of photographs, ‘The Rolling Stones Come to NW3’ is at the Zebra One Gallery, 1 Perrins Court, London NW3, May 1-14

Articles / Exhibitions – Guardian: Kander’s camera: the work of Nadav Kander (Guardian: April 2011) As a major exhibition of his work opens at The Lowry, Sandy Nairne, director of the National Portrait Gallery, introduces some of Nadav Kander’s most breathtaking images

The Guardian Guide, which is a little A5 size Saturday supplement to the newspaper, about current exhibitions; theatre, cinema, and TV listings, mentioned National Media Museum’s show The Lives of Great Photographers, which “aims to tell the life stories of some of the most renowned photographers of all time” (read it here)…one of the photographers featured is Weegee, and they even printed a photo of him taken by Richard Sadler…I found it fascinating, as I had never seen how Weegee looked like…

Agencies - NOOR April 2011 newsletter

Articles – Salon: How I almost lost my marriage in a war zone (Salon: April 2011)

Articles – Neiman Lab: Photoshop, journalism, and forensics: Why skepticism may be the best filter for photojournalism (Neiman Lab: April 2011)

Articles - David Campbell: Thinking Images v.14: Looking for agents not victims in Congo (DC blog: April 2011)

Exhibitions – Call for submissions : Open Show London : April 30 : Somerset House, Strand

Events / TalksSelf Publishing and Visual Storytelling with Photographers Zed Nelson, Simon Norfolk and Rob Hornstra : London : May 14-15 (Institute U)

Events – Roof Unit : Simon Roberts talk : May 25 : London

Is there anybody, who hasn’t written about Vivian Maier?

Articles- Telegraph: Vivian Maier: the nanny with a flair for photography (Telegraph: April 2011) To those who knew her, Vivian Maier was a loving if eccentric nanny. But now this mysterious Mary Poppins figure has been exposed as a photographic great

ServicesRobin Bell Photographic Printer : London

GalleriesLucy Bell : UK

Anastasia Taylor-Lind has updated her website with new stories, portraits and tearsheets… check it out…

PhotographersAnastasia Taylor-Lind

PhotographersKurt Wilberding

PhotographersCaroline Edge

PhotographersClayton Hauck

BlogsCity Visual

Interviews - Cheryl Newman on Editing (Professional Magazine: 2009)

Telegraph on Saturday Magazine DoP @cherylnewman1 is now on Twitter….One of her first tweets was about Naomi Harris (@mapledipped) and her website… Had  to check it out… Safe to say, Harris’ website looks nothing like any other photographer’s…None that I have seen anyway…You have to go and see it yourself…I’ll post here the front page… Hopefully she doesn’t mind…

PhotographersNaomi Harris 

@foto8 and @simoncroberts tweeted a link to the below Antonio Olmos photo printed in Guardian Eyewitness the other day…Compelling photograph indeed…

Blogs – Guardian Eyewitness: Antonio Olmos: Paying Tribute (Guardian: April 2011) Olmos’ website

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David R Arnott writes:Mitch Epstein has been awarded the 2011 Prix Pictet, an award for photography that tackles social and environmental issues. Epstein was nominated for his series American Power, which studies the different ways in which the country produces and uses energy and how that impacts on the landscape and environment.

Mitch Epstein via Prix Pictet

Amos Coal Power Plant, Raymond City, West Virginia. 2004.

Mitch Epstein via Prix Pictet

BP Carson Refinery, California. 2007.

Epstein says the project "asks everyone to look harder at their daily relationship to energy" and seeks to instigate a discussion about "the direction of American power. It is an opportune, if not crucial, moment in the history of the United States to discuss what it has done and could do with its natural resources, wealth, and might, but also its brain power, power of imagination, and power of community."

Mitch Epstein via Prix Pictet

Biloxi, Mississippi. 2005.

Mitch Epstein via Prix Pictet

Hoover Dam and Lake Mead,
Nevada/Arizona. 2007.

Read more about the work at Epstein's American Power website and at Prix Pictet.

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Elton Driscoll, Jr. carries a U.S. flag that he removed from a hotel down the deserted and boarded-up Bourbon Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans August 28, 2005.   REUTERS/Rick Wilking

While covering Hurricane Katrina ripping through New Orleans five years ago, it struck me how the individual events that unfolded in the aftermath echoed similar tragedies I had photographed around the globe.

Cynthia Gonzales runs through the rain with a stray dog she rescued from a destroyed gas station (background) in Gretna, Louisiana, as Hurricane Katrina hit August 29, 2005.   REUTERS/Rick Wilking

It was like several stories in one – a hurricane of course, but there was little typical hurricane damage in the city. In fact, before the levees broke and it turned into a flood story I was close to leaving to move further east along the coast to cover the near-total devastation in Mississippi.

Two men push their truck in flooded New Orleans August 30, 2005.  REUTERS/Rick Wilking

It was a huge human tragedy story, reminiscent of 9/11 in New York in some ways with dazed, confused and distraught people wandering the streets.

People affected by Hurricane Katrina walk on the elevated freeway in downtown New Orleans August 31, 2005.   REUTERS/Rick Wilking

It developed into a crime story with gangs of looters and hoodlums in charge and almost no police presence – all the hallmarks of Haiti during its wilder times.

A police car is submerged in New Orleans East August 31, 2005 after Hurricane Katrina hit the area.   REUTERS/Rick Wilking

Witnessing floating bodies in New Orleans struck me in the same way as seeing bodies discovered daily on the Port-au-Prince streets.

When the National Guard showed up to take control and help refugees stranded at the Convention Center, it was a scene that reminded me of covering U.S. peacekeeping troops in Bosnia as the war wound down.

New Orleans SWAT police armed with machine guns patrol downtown New Orleans August 30, 2005.  REUTERS/Rick Wilking

But it was all in one place – a major U.S. city – where this kind of thing was unheard of.

There are many images from the disaster that will remain with me forever. The most horrific was watching an elderly woman slowly die before my eyes. She sat in a wheelchair, still in a hospital gown, surrounded by the mob still waiting to be evacuated downtown almost two weeks after the storm hit.

Dorothy Divic, 89, is surrounded by onlookers who are trying to keep her alive on a street outside the New Orleans Convention Center September 1, 2005.  REUTERS/Rick Wilking

Miss Dorothy they called her but no one could say where she came from or how she got there.

Before she passed away a man carrying a baby shouted for my attention. He whisked an old dirty blanket off another elderly person, this one a man slumped over and dead in a lawn chair in the middle of the street.

A man holding a baby uncovers the body of a dead man, suspected to have been sitting there for two days, outside the New Orleans Convention Center September 1, 2005.  REUTERS/Rick Wilking

It was nearly incomprehensible. But, it was important to be there and show that scene to the world. Shortly after these images were published and seen by the world, National Guard troops showed up with water and evacuations began.

I’ve been back to the Gulf only once since then and that was to cover the BP oil spill. Signs of the storm are still everywhere, boarded up buildings, the smell of mold and vacant lots with only a set of stairs remaining to show where a building once stood.

A brick path leads nowhere on what once was a home on the Mississippi Gulf of Mexico coast May 5, 2010.  REUTERS/Rick Wilking

The area may physically recover someday but the emotional scars will be permanent. No one will ever forget the terrible loss caused by a hurricane named Katrina.

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Features and Essays – Michael Christopher Brown: China (Burn: July 2010)

Features and Essays - Paolo Pellegrin: Storm (Magnum Photos: July 2010) Pellgrin’s new book: Storm

Features and Essays – Stuart Franklin:  Life in Grand Isle after the BP oil spill (Guardian: July 2010) The Magnum photographer Stuart Franklin visits Louisiana where the Grand Isle community is dealing with the aftermath of the spill.

Features and Essays – Paulo Jorge Ferreira Montero: Profound Azores (Visura Spotlight: July 2010)

Features and Essays – Taryn Simon: Contraband (New York Times Magazine: July 2010) These images are from a set of 1,075 photographs — shot over five days last year for the book and exhibition, ‘‘Contraband’’ — of items detained or seized from passengers or express mail entering the United States from abroad at the New York airport. The miscellany of prohibited objects — from the everyday to the illegal to the just plain odd — attests to a growing worldwide traffic in counterfeit goods and natural exotica and offers a snapshot of the United States as seen through its illicit material needs and desires.

Features and Essays - Matthew Niederhauser: Beijing Continues Its March of Modernization (NYT: July 2010)

Features and Essays – Martine Franck: Women (Nowness: 2010)

Interviews - Matthew Niederhauser Matthew shoots his first video for the New York Times on a 5DmkII (DLSR News Shooter.com: 2010)

Articles – BJP: University students address children photography conundrum (BJP: July 2010) Amid the rising “paranoia surrounding the laws of photographing children in today’s society,” two Kingston University photography students have reproduced traditional school photographs with one twist – all the pupils have their backs to the camera

Articles - NYT Lens: ‘Step Away From the Camera!’ (NYT Lens: July 2010)

Facebook - FB page for Alixandra Fazzina’s book A Million Shillings – Escape from Somalia (FB: 2010)

Photographers – Pierre Marsaut got in touch to inform that he has a new website here

Blogs - 1000 Words Blog: Payback 2010 (1000 Words Blog: July 2010) Every photographers deserves Payback

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