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Original author: 
Arik Hesseldahl

cloud1Here’s a name I haven’t heard in a while: Anso Labs.

This was the cloud computing startup that originated at NASA, where the original ideas for OpenStack, the open source cloud computing platform, was born. Anso Labs was acquired by Rackspace a little more than two years ago.

It was a small team. But now a lot of the people who ran Anso Labs are back with a new outfit, still devoted to cloud computing, and still devoted to OpenStack. It’s called Nebula. And it builds a turnkey computer that will turn an ordinary rack of servers into a cloud-ready system, running — you guessed it — OpenStack.

Based in Mountain View, Calif., Nebula claims to have an answer for any company that has ever wanted to build its own private cloud system and not rely on outside vendors like Amazon or Hewlett-Packard or Rackspace to run it for them.

It’s called the Nebula One. And the setup is pretty simple, said Nebula CEO and founder Chris Kemp said: Plug the servers into the Nebula One, then you “turn it on and it boots up cloud.” All of the provisioning and management that a service provider would normally charge you for has been created on a hardware device. There are no services to buy, no consultants to pay to set it up. “Turn on the power switch, and an hour later you have a petascale cloud running on your premise,” Kemp told me.

The Nebula One sits at the top of a rack of servers; on its back are 48 Ethernet ports. It runs an operating system called Cosmos that grabs all the memory and storage and CPU capacity from every server in the rack and makes them part of the cloud. It doesn’t matter who made them — Dell, Hewlett-Packard or IBM.

Kemp named two customers: Genentech and Xerox’s research lab, PARC. There are more customer names coming, he says, and it already boasts investments from Kleiner Perkins, Highland Capital and Comcast Ventures. Nebula is also the only startup company that is a platinum member of the OpenStack Foundation. Others include IBM, HP, Rackspace, RedHat and AT&T.

If OpenStack becomes as easy to deploy as Kemp says it can be, a lot of companies — those that can afford to have their own data centers, anyway — are going to have their own clouds. And that is sort of the point.

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Btlive_large

BitTorrent today unveiled BitTorrent Live, a live streaming service designed to "eliminate barriers" for broadcasting by cutting down on infrastructure and other backend costs. The new protocol (currently in beta) accomplishes this by relying on the same peer-to-peer technology BitTorrent uses to transfer large files across the internet. Company founder Bram Cohen has spent three years working on the project, according to a recent interview with TechCrunch. Rather than introducing a middleman, BitTorrent Live forges a direct connection between broadcasters and their viewers, transforming each person tuning in into "a miniature broadcaster." Cohen says the broadcast delay is typically just five seconds. This "more efficient" method of...

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Construction on the Sagrada Familia began in 1883, when famed architect Antoni Gaudi first laid the blueprint for his now-iconic Barcelona church. Gaudi devoted his last years to the project, and 130 years later, it's widely regarded as one of the most stunningly unique buildings on Earth. It also has yet to be completed.

CBS News took a closer look at the Sagrada Familia on Sunday's 60 Minutes, delving into the history and mythology behind Gaudi's unfinished masterpiece. It's this history, together with an almost religious devotion to Gaudi's legacy, that drives much of today's efforts to complete the building. Gaudi had meticulously laid out the Sagrada Familia with a set of models he constructed before his death in 1926, but these...

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Apple's Phil Schiller has been known to fire salvos at the competition using Twitter, and today he's back at it. In April of last year, the marketing chief notoriously claimed that Instagram had "jumped the shark" in its expansion to Android. And now he's again aiming his sights squarely at Google's mobile OS. "Be safe out there," reads Schiller's latest tweet, paired with a link that points to F-Secure's latest Mobile Threat Report.

The document, which has already received its fair share of coverage today (even before Schiller's tweet), makes Android's current security predicament seem like some kind of nightmare. "In the fourth quarter alone, 96 new families and variants of Android threats were discovered," it reads. Android's "threat...

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Screen_shot_2013-03-07_at_9

Clever video mashup artists putting beloved TV characters in oddball situations is nothing new — take this re-imagining of Seinfeld as a dramatic movie trailer — but these new takes on Breaking Bad and The Walking Dead take the concept to the extreme. Breaking Bad, know for being one of the darkest and grittiest shows on TV over the last few years, gets re-cut into the opening credits of a '90s-era sitcom, complete with big smiles, shared heartfelt moments, and an incredibly cheesy (but yet appropriate) soundtrack from Foreigner. It's all the best parts of the opening credits from classics like Friends, Full House, Home Improvement, or Growing Pains, but instead of Ross and Rachel you have the wacky pairing of Walt and Aaron.

...

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Google's how search works

Google has launched a new animated website called "How Search Works." It's an interactive scrolling graphic that shows what goes on behind the scenes everytime someone types a query into Google Search, broken into three distinct sections: one on Google's massive web-crawling and indexing operation (covering 30 trillion pages), another on its alogrithms and ranking strategy, and a final section on how it fights and removes spam.

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Vint Cerf TED 2013

In a TED talk this evening, internet pioneer Vint Cerf took the stage to describe how the internet will eventually allow us to communicate with other species — even ones from another planet. The comments came as part of a group presentation, featuring the likes of musician Peter Gabriel and physicist Neil Gershenfeld, that focused on how technology is being used to communicate with animals. Cerf said that when he was designing the framework for what eventually became the internet, he realized that it was not simply a way for machines to connect — it was a way for people to interact. However, that's essentially just a starting point.

"All kinds of possible sentient beings may be interconnected."

"Now what's important about what...

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Vimeo Looks

The user-uploaded videos you find at Vimeo are typically a hair more polished than your average YouTube clip, but that doesn't mean the company is averse to embracing the filters trend. In fact, that's exactly what it's doing today with the rollout of Looks, a new addition to the site's Enhancer toolset that offers over 500 visual effects users can add to their projects. Everything is done directly within the web browser, and you're able to preview each effect in realtime before deciding if it's the right match. With the overwhelming number of options, Vimeo has helpfully categorized Looks by genre and mood to help filmmakers quickly excise effects that aren't likely to fit. Perhaps most intriguing, the video site can also choose a Look...

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mobile data iphone

Cellphone data searches are a contentious topic: there's no clear overall consensus on how much information police can get from a phone before needing a warrant, or how deep a search should be able to go. When we carry a portal to most of our lives in our pockets, should police be able to look into it the same way they would a notebook or wallet? Tangential to this issue is how much information actually is collected in an average search. While we don't know the answer to that, the ACLU has published one warrant that can give us some idea.

Filed in September 2012 as part of an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) drug investigation, the warrant allows Michigan police to seize "historical information regarding call activity, 'phone...

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