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Original author: 
Jon Brodkin

Niall Kennedy

Todd Kuehnl has been a developer for nearly 20 years and says he's tried "pretty much every language under the sun."

But it was only recently that Kuehnl discovered Go, a programming language unveiled by Google almost four years ago. Go is still a new kid on the block, but for Kuehnl, the conversion was quick. Now he says "Go is definitely by far my favorite programming language to work in." Kuehnl admitted he is "kind of a fanboy."

I'm no expert in programming, but I talked to Kuehnl because I was curious what might draw experienced coders to switch from proven languages to a brand new one (albeit one co-invented by the famous Ken Thompson, creator of Unix and the B programming language). Google itself runs some of its back-end systems on Go, no surprise for a company that designs its own servers and much of the software (right down to the operating systems) that its employees use. But why would non-Google engineers go with Go?

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Original author: 
Germain Lussier

Just Like Being There header

Briefly: You may remember last year’s South by Southwest film festival when I wrote a blog about appearing in a documentary. That documentary, Just Like Being There directed by Scout Shannon, is now available on Netflix Instant. It’s a carefree journey through the world of limited edition gig posters, told through the music of festivals like SXSW and more.

Eventually, it gets to Mondo and the current movie poster craze, where you can my embarrassing contribution, but if you’re bored this weekend and looking for a flick, there are many worse ways you can spend 90 minutes. Here’s the direct link.

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