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marius watz

From the Catenary Madness series (created with Toxiclibs, see code on OpenProcessing)

Workshop: Advanced Processing – Geometry and animation
Sat June 29th, Park Slope, NYC

Processing is a great tool for producing complex and compelling visuals, but computational geometry can be a challenge for many coders because of its unfamiliar logic and reliance on mathematics. In this workshop we’ll break down some of the underlying principles, making them more comprehensible and showing that we can create amazing output while relying on a set of relatively simple techniques.

Participants will learn advanced strategies for creating generative visuals and motion in 2D/3D. This will include how to describe particle systems and generating 3D mesh geometry, as well as useful techniques for code-based animation and kinetic behaviors. We will use the power of libraries like Modelbuilder and Toxiclibs, not just as convenient workhorses but as providers of useful conceptual approaches.

The workshop will culminate in the step-by-step recreation of the Catenary Madness piece shown above, featuring a dynamic mesh animated by physics simulation and shaded with vertex-by-vertex coloring. For that demo we’ll be integrating Modelbuilder and Toxiclibs to get the best of worlds.

Suitable for: Intermediate to advanced. Participants should be familiar with Processing or have previous coding experience allowing them to understand the syntax. Creating geometry means relying on vectors and simple trigonometry as building blocks, so some math is unavoidable. I recommend that participants prepare by going through Shiffman’s excellent Nature of Code chapter on vectors) and Ira Greenberg’s Processing.org tutorial on trig.

Practical information

Venue + workshop details: My apartment in Park Slope, Brooklyn. Workshops run from 10am to 5pm, with a 1 hour break for lunch (not included). Workshops have a maximum of 6 participants, keeping them nice and intimate.

Price: $180 for artists and freelancers, $250 for agency professionals. Students (incl. recent graduates) and repeat visitors enjoy a $30 discount.

Price: $180 for artists and freelancers, $250 for design professionals and institutionally affiliated academics. Students (incl. recent graduates) and repeat visitors enjoy a $30 discount. The price scale works by the honor system and there is no need to justify your decision.

Basically, if you’re looking to gainfully apply the material I teach in the commercial world or enjoy a level of financial stability not shared by independent artists like myself, please consider paying the higher price. In doing so you are supporting the basic research that is a large part of my practice, producing knowledge and tools I invariably share by teaching and publishing code. It’s still reasonable compared to most commercial training, plus you might just get your workplace to pay the bill.

Booking: To book a spot on a workshop please email info@mariuswatz.com with your name, address and cell phone # as well as the name of the workshop you’re interested in. If you’re able to pay the higher price level please indicate that in your email. You will be sent a PayPal URL where you can complete your payment.

Attendance is confirmed once payment is received. Keep in mind that there is a limited number of seats on each workshop.

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Original author: 
Jon Brodkin

Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock

It's time to ask yourself an uncomfortable question: how many of your passwords are so absurdly weak that they might as well provide no security at all? Those of you using "123456," "abc123," or even just "password" might already know it's time to make some changes. And using pets' names, birth dates, your favorite sports teams, or adding a number or capital letter to a weak password isn't going to be enough.

Don’t worry, we're here to help. We’re going to focus on how to use a password manager, software that can help you go from passwords like "111111" to "6WKBTSkQq8Zn4PtAjmz7" without making you want to pull out all your hair. For good measure, we'll talk about how creating fictitious answers to password reset questions (e.g. mother's maiden name) can make you even more resistant to hacking.

Why you can’t just wing it anymore

A password manager helps you create long, complicated passwords for websites and integrates into your browser, automatically filling in your usernames and passwords. Instead of typing a different password into each site you visit, you only have to remember one master password.

Read 83 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Original author: 
Dan Goodin

A website that accepts payment in exchange for knocking other sites offline is perfectly legal, the proprietor of the DDoS-for-hire service says. Oh, it also contains a backdoor that's actively monitored by the FBI.

Ragebooter.net is one of several sites that openly accepts requests to flood sites with huge amounts of junk traffic, KrebsonSecurity reporter Brian Krebs said in a recent profile of the service. The site, which accepts payment by PayPal, uses so-called DNS reflection attacks to amplify the torrents of junk traffic. The technique requires the attacker to spoof the IP address of lookup requests and bounce them off open domain name system servers. This can generate data floods directed at a target that are 50 times bigger than the original request.

Krebs did some sleuthing and discovered the site was operated by Justin Poland of Memphis, Tennessee. The reporter eventually got an interview and found Poland was unapologetic.

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Peter Bright

Microsoft Accounts—the credentials used for Hotmail, Outlook.com, the Windows Store, and other Microsoft services—will soon offer two-factor authentication to ensure that accounts can't be compromised through disclosure of the password alone.

Revealed by LiveSide, the two factor authentication will use a phone app—which is already available for Windows Phone, even though the two-factor authentication isn't switched on yet—to generate a random code. This code must be entered alongside the password.

For systems that are used regularly, it's possible to disable the code requirement and allow logging in with the password alone. For systems that only accept passwords, such as e-mail clients, it appears that Microsoft will allow the creation of one-off application-specific passwords.

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Police Car Blood Tornado Explosion Man might not be the most popular superhero out there, but he gets the job done.

In a good and just world, all promising games would get Kickstarted, and everyone would live happily ever after. Also, clothes would always feel fresh out of the laundry and chocolate would be the cure for war. Unfortunately, however, our world is not just, and calling it “good” is probably a bit of a stretch. That depressing tangent brings us to Project Awakened. It failed to pass muster on Kickstarter, in spite of promising our neither good nor just world, er, the world. But sometimes, the best ideas only spring to mind when backs are pressed firmly against the wall, and Phosphor’s certainly hatched an intriguing one. In short, it plans to gauge interest in a second crowdfunding effort, but this time it’ll run its own site and – here’s the Kickstarter-stomping kicker – declare backers “partial owners” of the property.

(more…)

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GCirc01E-025

Update: In my eagerness to announce these workshops I made a scheduling error, incorrectly thinking the dates would be March 15+16 rather than 16+17. As a result I need to move one of the workshops to the weekend before, and since the Intro workshop should happen before the Advanced the new dates will be:

  • Saturday March 9: Introduction to Processing and Generative Art
  • Saturday March 16: Generative Art, Advanced Topics

Sorry for the confusion! On the plus side the Intro workshop might now be a smaller group which should make it nice and intimate.

I haven’t done any workshops in New York since November, so I have decided to offer my Intro and Advanced Generative Art workshops back-to-back the weekend of March 16+17 on consecutive weekends, Saturday March 9 and Saturday March 17.

The venue will be my apartment in comfortable Park Slope, Brooklyn. As usual I have 8 spots available for each workshop, they do tend to reach capacity so get in touch sooner rather than later. Reservation is by email and your spot is confirmed once I receive payment via PayPal.

The workshops will be taught using the most recent Processing 2.0 beta version (2.0b8 as of this moment), and as usual I will be using my own Modelbuilder library as a toolkit for solving the tasks we look. Familiarizing yourself with Processing 2.0 and Modelbuilder would be good preparation.

Make sure to download Modelbuilder-0019 and Control-P5 2.0.4, then run through the provided examples. Check OpenProcessing.org for more Modelbuilder examples.

Note about dataviz: I know there is a lot of interest in data vizualization and I do get asked about that frequently in workshops. I can’t promise to cover data in detail since it’s a pretty big topic.

If you’re specifically looking for data techniques I would recommend looking at the excellent workshops series taught by my friend Jer Thorp. He currently offers two such workshops, titled “Processing and Data Visualization” and “Archive, Text, & Character(s)”.

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[ See post to watch video ]

Say you want to quickly transfer a file, like a photo or a contact entry, from your smartphone to a friend’s. Most people would email or text the file. But a number of technologies have come along to make the process quicker and simpler.

On some Android phones, you can “beam” files like photos from phone to phone by tapping one phone to another, or bringing them very close. But that requires that both phones have a special chip, called NFC, which isn’t yet universal on Android phones and doesn’t exist at all in iPhones.

Another approach is to use an app called Bump, which transfers files between iPhones and Android phones when those holding them do a sort of sideways fist bump. It works pretty well, but you have to make contact with the other person.

image

With the Xsync iPhone app, you select an audio file, photo, video, contact or calendar appointment by tapping on the simple icon that represents each one.

This week, I’ve been testing a different approach — an iPhone app called Xsync. It doesn’t require any special chip and instead uses a free app and a hardware feature almost every smartphone possesses — the camera. While it is primarily meant, like Bump, for transfers between phones in proximity, it works over long distances. I was able to almost instantly send and get photos, videos and songs using Xsync between two iPhones held up to computer webcams during a Skype video call.

The key to Xsync is the QR code, that square symbol found seemingly everywhere these days—online, in print newspapers and magazines, on posters and other places. These codes typically just contain text—often, a Web address. But Xsync, a tiny company based in Seattle, generates QR codes that initiate the transfer of whole files, or in the case of photos, even groups of files. It has a built-in QR code scanner to read these codes using the phone’s camera.

The biggest drawback to Xsync is that it is currently only available for the iPhone. An Android version is planned for sometime this quarter. Meanwhile, you can use an Android phone with any QR code reader to receive, though not send, files sent via Xsync.

The Xsync app is something of a teaser for the underlying technology, which the company calls the Optical Message Service. The company’s goal isn’t to build its own apps, but to license the technology to cellphone makers so it becomes a built-in way to transfer files.

Here’s how it works. Once you install Xsync on your iPhone, you select an audio file, photo, video, contact or calendar appointment, each of which is represented by a simple icon. The app creates a QR code representing the intended transfer of that file and temporarily sends the file to Xsync’s server. Your friend uses Xsync to scan the QR code you’ve created with his or her iPhone’s camera, and the files are sent to your friend’s iPhone.

In my tests, it was easy, quick and reliable. I successfully used Xsync to send and receive all the included types of files with an iPhone 5, an iPhone 4S and an iPad mini. I was also able to receive files on an Android phone, a Google Nexus 4, via a QR code generated by Xsync.

image

The app generates QR codes that initiate the transfer of whole files, or in the case of photos, even groups of files.

You can even generate a QR code using Xsync that will allow you to transfer money from your PayPal account to another person’s, though that requires an added authentication step for security. But it worked, and would be a good way to, say, split a bill at a restaurant. (This PayPal feature of Xsync doesn’t work with Android, for now.)

The company says the file transfers are secure, for two reasons. First, they are encrypted. More important, each code is generated for a specific transfer and expires after a relatively short time. For instance, codes for photos expire after 24 hours, according to the company.

You can use Xsync to transmit certain kinds of files — including documents — you’ve stored in your Dropbox account, though, oddly, the Xsync app hides this document-transfer feature under an icon for sharing calendar appointments.

And you don’t have to be close to make the transfer. In addition to my Skype example, you can send a QR code generated by Xsync via email or text message, or even post the code to Facebook. Another person can then scan the code to get the file.

Xsync can generate codes that represent either existing files on your phone, or files you create on the spot. If you don’t want to use an existing one, the audio, photo, video and calendar icons in the app invite you to create a new file to be transferred.

On the iPhone, the receiving device displays the transferred files right within the Xsync app. If you’re using an Android phone to receive, you get a Web address that leads you to the file on Xsync’s server.

If you have an iPhone, Xsync is an effective way to transfer files like photos, songs, videos and more between phones.

Email Walt at mossberg@wsj.com.

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Green Dot today launches the smartphone-based GoBank, which will have no overdraft or penalty fees, no minimum balance and a “pay what you feel is right” monthly membership fee.

iphone_payLet’s take a step back to set this up. Lots of startup types go about their lives in search of something they can fix. “Banking!” they think. “Banking sucks! I hate all the fees and unfriendliness.”

But then they realize that banking is really hard. To do it right, you have to actually officially be a bank, which takes years, even if you can find an existing bank to buy. So startups like WePay and BankSimple (now Simple, if that tells you anything) have historically partnered with banks and offered user interfaces layered on top.

GoBank promises that it can fully bridge the two worlds. That’s because prepaid card provider Green Dot actually bought an FDIC-insured bank in Utah back in 2011, after two years of regulatory hurdles.

Then, in March, Green Dot bought Loopt, an early mobile location app maker that never had a ton of usage. But Loopt had a team of mobile developers and a strong leader in Sam Altman, one of the earliest participants in Y Combinator and a significant influence on the famous startup program as a part-time partner.

Altman said in an interview yesterday that he’s seen many a startup apply to YC over the years, trying to be a bank. But none of them were equipped to do it. “This is a product I’ve always wanted to build,” he said, “and it was just starting up when we were talking to Green Dot.”

Altman said it should take approximately four minutes to set up a GoBank account, and it can be done from a mobile phone. Starting today, GoBank plans to let 10,000 U.S. users in for a beta test, and expand from there.

GoBank charges for just four things: Putting a personal photo on your debit card ($9), going to an out-of-network ATM ($2.50), spending money in another country (3 percent), and paying your membership fee (whatever you want, a la Radiohead or Humble Bundle).

SamAltmanGoBankBut it promises that it has a huge network of fee-free ATMs — 40,000, more than twice as many as Chase and Bank of America.

The iPhone and Android apps also include budget tools (including a silly “fortune teller” feature that makes judgment calls on new purchases), an option to see your balance without logging in, bill payments and ways to send money to people outside the network through PayPal. Savings accounts and mobile alerts are also included.

The idea of allowing people to pay whatever they want for banking is an odd one. It might make sense in the context of thinking about the human appreciation you have for an artist like Radiohead, but this is a bank we’re talking about. Users can pay anywhere from $0 to $9 per month.

Altman said he likes the challenge. “We’re accountable to deliver a service that users think is worth something.”

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