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Adrianne Jeffries

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Defendants Elvis Rafael Rodriguez and Emir Yasser Yeje posing with approximately $40,000 with cash. Source: US Attorney, Eastern District of New York

If you’d been waiting for the ATM inside the deli at East 59th and Third in Manhattan on Tuesday, February 19th around 9:24PM, you would have been annoyed. A young man in a black beanie and puffy black jacket made seven withdrawals in a row, stuffing around $5,620 into his blue backpack. The man wasted no time. He exited the deli and headed up five blocks to repeat the process at four more ATMs, finishing his route at a Chase bank at 69th and Third at 9:55PM, where he made four withdrawals totaling $4,000.

While the man in the black beanie was beelining along the Upper East Side, seven...

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A few weeks ago, I posted what I thought were Shadowrun Returns screenshots, only to be told that they were ‘concept pieces’. I consider that to be the worst thing that has happened to me in 2013 so far. The twenty minutes of alpha footage in the video below are definitely genuine though. I can tell because Jordan Weisman is one of the narrators and he has been running in the shadows since 1989. If you choose to watch, you’ll be treated to a great deal of handsome isometric cyberpunk combat and dialogue, with excitable and explanatory voiceovers.

(more…)

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There’s a reason why Elon Musk is being called the next Steve Jobs. Like Jobs he’s a visionary, a super successful serial entrepreneur having made his initial fortune with a company he sold to Compaq before starting Paypal. Like Jobs, he saved his beloved baby Tesla Motors from the brink of oblivion. Like Jobs, he’s a genius generalist with “huge steel balls” (according to his ex-wife) and a knack for paradigm-shifting industry disruption. Which means he’s also hard to work with. “Like Jobs, Elon does not tolerate C or D players,” SpaceX board member and early Tesla investor Steve Jurvetson told BusinessWeek.

But while Jobs was slinging multi-colored music players and touchable smartphones, Musk is building rocket ships and electric-powered supercars. It’s why his friends describe him as not just Steve Jobs but also John D. Rockefeller and Howard Hughes all wrapped in one. His friend Jon Favreau used Musk as the real-life inspiration for the big screen version of Tony Stark. Elon Musk is a badass.

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The way you present your product or service is essential to its success — or at least it could be if you know how to do it right. On the Web, like anywhere else, the first impression you make on people is crucial. When selling a product, you want that first impression to be as positive and remarkable as possible.

Once people visit your website, make sure to attract their attention. If you have managed to draw them in, you will need to introduce the product within a few seconds. According to last year’s Google Analytics benchmarking report, bounce rates in the US were as high as 42.5%. If people don’t understand what you are offering them or how it works, they will lose interest quickly. Show them that your product is just what they want, that it’s useful and that it adds some kind of value to their lives.

A smart product presentation does all of that. Here, we will cover different aspects of a product presentation and give examples of how to use them to your advantage. The idea is to give you an overview of the different elements that make a product page successful.

Attract Attention

Before convincing anyone of the quality of your product, you need to make sure it gets noticed. No matter whether people are looking for your particular product, once you have caught their attention, you are in a good position to arouse their interest and get them engaged. The things you can do to catch the user’s eye are limited only by your creativity. Here are three examples that we believe are effective.

Stand Out From the Crowd

Countless companies and people freelance in the creative sectors, and all of them offer some kind of information about their services and prior work. Usually, you can browse portfolios to find a bunch of boring screenshots accompanied by even more boring information.


(Image: Chris Bower)

Web designer Chris Bower has found a unique and appealing way to demonstrate his expertise. His professional presentation of his work on various devices accomplishes three things. It is the ultimate eye-catcher on an otherwise clean website; it conveys the designer’s quality because it looks truly professional; and it shows that Chris designs for any device you can think of. With only a glance at his home page, you know whether to enter or leave the website.

Surprise Your Visitors

Another great way to attract attention is by surprising visitors. Offer them something they did not expect; make them pause and think to make sense of what they see. We like to be surrounded by the familiar, and things that don’t fit our expectations automatically draw our attention.


(Image: Nike)

Nike presents its new running shoes in the shape of wings, with the promise of a “Super-natural ride.” The arrangement of these multi-colored shoes and the fade in the middle almost force people to take a second look. The visual is not only appealing, but attracts attention because people are not sure whether they are looking at wings or shoes or both.

People Love Humor

Plenty of products out there are easy to promote, whether because of their function, popularity or unique look. Other products are less conducive to effective marketing and require a more creative approach.


(Image: Evian)

One such example is the brand Evian. How could boring water possibly attract attention? Quite simple, actually. Come up with a product-related slogan, such as “Live young,” and then translate that slogan into a visual campaign using some great humor. A couple of years back, Evian’s funny campaign videos went viral — proof that its unique approach works.

Explain The Product

The way you present the product is crucial to people’s first impression of both you and the product — including what they think of you and whether they understand the nature of the product. Online services and new products especially need clarification in order for the audience to make sense of them. Obviously, if people don’t get your product or understand why they would need it, they won’t pay for it.

Introduce the Product

With the ease of access to technologies such as the Internet, the number of inventions has significantly increased. Any ready idea nowadays can be turned into a product or service, but some of these ideas are so abstract that they require careful explanation.


(Image: Tickera)

The people behind Tickera recognized a need to carefully explain what their system is about. Their home page is simple, and the focus is on the product and its main features. Of course, a ticketing service is not a physical product that you can arrange nicely and take pictures of. But they did a great job of translating their service into a beautiful and trustworthy visual. With only a look, it becomes clear what Tickera is about.

How Does It Work?

Related to how you present the product is your explanation of how it works. Basically, you can do this by showing the product in action. And there is a big difference between showing a screenshot of software and showing the software on the device it is intended for.


(Image: Square)

Square is a perfect example of how to present a product and demonstrate what it is and how it works. The high-resolution image shows how simple collecting and processing credit-card payments on the go can be. All you need is the little Square card reader, an iPhone and the app — no words needed to convey the value of this product.

Convince People That They Need It

It could happen that people understand how your product works but don’t recognize its potential benefit to them. This is why you should point out the advantages that people will get from your product. People consider something to be more relevant if they can relate it to themselves.


(Image: Action Method)

The task-management tool Action Method focuses on its main advantage to the user: always being in sync. Seeing these different devices together, the visitor can see that this app could make life much easier for them. Perhaps they’re thinking about how annoying it is to take notes on a laptop and not be able to access them later on from a different device.

Focus On The Main Selling Point

Most products have many features but only a few or even one selling point that makes them special. Distancing yourself from competitors is important, whether through hardware features, design, service or something else. Point out this difference when presenting the product and show people that the product is different, special and better.

Quality

Quality is an effective selling point. And if the product costs a lot, people will want to be especially sure they are getting good quality in return. Competitors might offer the same product or feature but not the same quality. Reflect the quality of the product in your presentation of it.


(Image: Chanel)

Chanel present all of its products in high-resolution photographs. The images were obviously taken by professionals. The white watch above is bedded in perfectly white soft feathers. The image is extremely detailed, the viewer instantly gets a feel for the quality and luxury of the brand.

Features

Whatever your product, chances are high that at least one competitor offers something similar. To convince people that yours is the better choice, focus on features — particularly those that are relevant or essential to your target group.


(Image: HTC)

All smartphones basically offer the same functions. For example, they enable people to make calls, send messages and connect to the Internet. Instead of listing all of the things that all smartphones can do, HTC focuses on special features that are of concern to its target group: camera and sound.

Customization

People love products that have some personal meaning for them. That’s why we love to personalize our possessions, such as phone settings, laptop screens and clothing style. Customizing things helps us shape our identity, which is why customizable products are more special to us.


(Image: Converse)

Offer customization options to connect customers to your brand and products. Converse really makes a point that people can design their own sneakers. Being able to customize your own shoes definitely adds value to the brand.

Don’t Underestimate Copywriting

On the Web, our senses are limited. We send messages blindly, without looking our correspondent in the eyes. However, our limited senses should not limit our creativity. We can use more than plain images and text to make our point. Our message is shaped by our choice of words, typeface, font size and even punctuation.

Play With Words

Puns are a great way to attract attention because they wrap a message in a familiar concept. You are giving visitors something they recognize and are linking it to your own message. Wordplay can be used to explain a concept quickly and convey familiarity.


(Image: Apple)

Apple does this very effectively. It pioneered the tablet and puts everything into showing that it is the best in the field. The iPad 3 has a revolutionary display, which is the main selling point of this latest version. The pun “Resolutionary” is powerful and demonstrates in a single word the high quality of the product.

Don’t Get Too Serious

A good laugh helps people bond. You can surely think of more than one example of an inside joke that fostered a sense of connectedness and belonging. The same can be done online. A funny or ironic headline could be all you need to sell a product. Obviously, you can do both: bond with visitors and send a meaningful message.


(Image: Jax Vineyards)

A perfect example of a funny and powerful headline can be found on the website of Jax Vineyards: “Your food should be so lucky.” Of course, your food would not actually be lucky, no matter which wine you pair it with, but the idea of cherishing your food by choosing the right wine is appealing. Imagine spending hours preparing the perfect dinner; spoiling it with the wrong wine would be a shame, right?

Use Metaphors

Metaphors can bring copy — and, by extension, the product — to life. Metaphors help us understand the world around us and make sense of unfamiliar things. Abstract ideas such as the reason why your product is so special could also be easily explained with the right metaphor.


(Image: Adidas)

Adidas promotes its new running shoe with the slogan, “Sweat nothing, climacool seduction.” The melody of the words and the association triggered by the word “seduction” could easily cause us to misread the slogan as “Sweet nothing, climacool seduction.” The ad gains a risqué charm, giving off a light and comfortable feeling — perhaps acquiring an association with alluring lingerie. The link between running shoes and lingerie is not at all obvious, but it works brilliantly and transfers a positive and familiar association to a new line of running shoes.

Make Use of Context

The context in which you present a product is just as important as the product itself, if not more so. It is the space in which you show the product in action. It is the accumulation of associations that trigger emotions in customers. It draws people in and convinces them that they need your product.

Awake Desires

Motion pictures are a great way to draw people into a different world. Why else do we go to the movies, if not to escape our everyday lives and immerse ourselves in some romantic love story or surrealistic adventure? You can use the same effect on your customers and enable them to experience, say, the pleasure of a vacation.


(Image: Post Ranch Inn)

The 24-hour time-lapse video of the idyllic Post Ranch Inn gives visitors the feeling that they have already been there. The website takes you on a journey from sunrise to sunset, whisking you away from your desk on a long-awaited and deserved vacation.

Trigger positive emotions

You can also use a narrative or mascot to add value to the product. Focusing not on the product itself but on the emotions that come with it is a clever strategy. Customers might have plenty of options, but if you sell them the right feeling, they will be easily convinced.


(Image: Fanta)

Fanta uses animated characters who enjoy life to the fullest and have a lot of fun. The slogan “More Fanta. Less Serious.” communicates the idea that Fanta will relax you and let you have fun. There is no reference to the drink itself, such as ingredients. The only thing you see is the emotional triggers of happy characters and bright positive colors.

Appeal to Your Target Group

Every target group is different, with different interests, levels of knowledge, expectations and so on. Clearly define your target group to make sure you appeal to the right people. Defining a target group means truly understanding what makes them tick: their motivations, goals and habits. Only with a clear picture of who you are designing for will you be able to create a product that people really need and desire.


(Image: Olay)

Products like the age-defying line from Olay have a clearly defined target group: middle-aged women. Products for the body — especially related to sensitive subjects, such as aging — are considered intimate and require a high level of trust. Olay appeals to just that desire and presents its products in a professional yet familiar and trustworthy way.

Offer Sufficient Information

Factual information can be important to selling a product. People make rational decisions based on factual information, especially when purchasing expensive items — at least they like to think so. Factual information not only answers questions people might have about the product, but makes people more confident in their decision.

Highlight Advantages

Facts are a great way to point out a product’s advantages. Clear statements and factual information can be very convincing, and that’s what you intend to do at the end of the day, right?


(Image: Heineken)

You would not necessarily expect a beer brand to volunteer factual information. Yet Heineken presents its tap beer with clarity and sophistication. The information is given a serious and refined atmosphere, instead of Heineken’s usual fun style.

Make Detailed Information Optional

For some products, people really need certain information before being able to decide. This information could be a list of features, technical specifications or anything else. If your product requires such information, make sure people don’t have to hunt for it.


(Image: Viking)

Viking presents a high-resolution image along with a simple textual description. The first impression is very clean. Of course, when buying a lawn mower, a person needs more detailed information; thus, technical specifications and equipment details are neatly included in separate tabs.

Convince With Facts

Use facts to underpin the message that you are conveying visually. Information helps a person feel more confident if it confirms something they already feel.


(Image: Porsche)

No one really needs a sports car. But people do want them, and they buy them for leisure. Porsche uses a lot of great visuals to convey a feeling of speed, excitement and precision. Yet it also offers some information with these visuals — some, though, not much; just enough to underpin the emotions conveyed by the image: power, independence and luxury.

Conclusion

Whether you are selling a gadget, software, service or anything else, your presentation will have a direct impact on people’s first impression. And on the Web, which offers many choices and where people can leave your website in a mouse click, this first impression is crucial to your relationship with visitors and to gaining new customers.

A good presentation will draw the visitor’s attention, help them understand the product and even convince them to buy it. Use sketches, detailed illustrations or vivid photographs to communicate your message. Together with thoughtfully written copy, this presentation could well be the most important asset on your website.

Editor’s Note: This article was created using a new tool from Usabilla, that allows you to collect and discover design elements, like the ones presented in this article. Find more design elements at: discover.usabilla.com.

(al) (fi)

© Sabina Idler for Smashing Magazine, 2012.

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How can we make sense of it all?
A few weeks ago, I had dinner with Saumil and Sailesh, co-founders of LocBox.* Instagram had just been acquired by Facebook and there was speculation (later confirmed) about a big up round financing of Path. The recent large financing of Pinterest was still in the air, and the ongoing parlor game of when Facebook would go public and at what price was still being played. A couple of months prior, Zynga had acquired OMGPOP.

Sailesh wondered aloud, “How much time do we have for any of these?” “How many of them can coexist?” and “Do we really need them?” My answers were, respectively: “A lot.” “Many of them.” and “No, but we want them.” That dinner discussion prompted some observations that I am outlining here, and I invite you to share your own observations in the comments below.

In a nutshell, the Internet has evolved from being a need-driven utility medium with only a handful of winners to a discovery-driven entertainment medium with room for multiple winners. The necessary and sufficient conditions for this evolution are now in place — broadband, real names and tablets are the three horsemen of this New New Web. As consumers, entrepreneurs and investors, we should get used to the fact that the online economy is increasingly blurring with the offline economy, and in the limit, that distinction will disappear. As a result, just as in the real world, the Web of entertainment will be much bigger than the Web of utility.

A Theory of Human Motivation
One framework for understanding the consumer Internet is Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, which Abraham Maslow put forward as a way of explaining human behavior at large. The core premise is that once our basic needs of food, shelter, safety and belonging are satisfied, we tend to focus on things that are related to creativity, entertainment, education and self-improvement. A key aspect of this framework is that it’s sequential: Unless the basic needs are met, one cannot focus on other things. As an example, a study in 2011 showed that humans who are hungry will spend more on food and less on non-food items compared to those who are not hungry. Using this framework, we can see how consumer adoption of the Web has evolved over the last 20 years, and why all of the ingredients are only now in place for consumers to use the Web for what Maslow called “self-actualization” — a pursuit of one’s full potential, driven by desire, not by necessity.

1992-2012: Web of Need
Between the AOL IPO in 1992 and the Facebook IPO last month, the Internet has largely been in the business of satisfying basic consumer needs. In 1995, the year Netscape went public and made the internet accessible to the masses, I was a young product manager for a consumer Internet company called Global Village Communication. We were a newly minted public company and our hottest product was a “high speed” fax/modem with a speed of 33.6 kbps. Back then, using the Internet as a consumer or making a living off it as a business was rather difficult, and sometimes simply frustrating. In the subsequent years the basic needs of access, browser, email, search and identity were solved by companies such as AOL, Comcast, Netscape, Yahoo, Google, LinkedIn and Facebook.

2012-?: Web of Want
Today, the billion users on Facebook have reached the apex of Maslow’s hierarchy on the web. All of our basic needs have been satisfied. Now we are in pursuit of self-actualization. It is no surprise that on the Web, we are now open to playing games (Zynga, Angry Birds), watching video (YouTube, Hulu), listening to music (Pandora, Spotify), expressing our creativity (Instagram, Twitter, Draw Something), window shopping (Pinterest, Gojee*) and pursuing education (Khan Academy, Empowered*).

The Web Is Becoming Like TV
How do we make sense out of a Web where multiple providers coexist, serving groups of people who share a similar desire? Turns out we already have a very good model for understanding how this can work: Television. Specifically, cable television. The Web is becoming like TV, with hundreds of networks or “channels” that are programmed to serve content to an audience with similar desires and demographics. Pinterest, ShoeDazzle, Joyous and Alt12* programmed for young, affluent women; Machinima, Kixeye and Kabam programmed for mostly male gamers; Gojee* for food enthusiasts; Triposo* for travellers; GAINFitness* for fitness fans and so on.

In this new new Web, an important ingredient to success is a clear understanding of the identity of your users to ensure that you are programming to that user’s interests. The good news is that unlike TV, the Web has a feedback loop. Everything can be measured and as a result the path from concept to success can be more capital efficient by measuring what type of programming is working every step of the way — it’s unlikely that the new new Web will ever produce a Waterworld.

Why Now? Broadband, Real Names & Tablets
As my partner Doug Pepper recently wrote, a key question when evaluating a new opportunity is to ask “Why Now?” Certainly, companies like AOL, Yahoo and Myspace have tried before to program the Web to cater to interests of specific audiences. What’s different now? Three things: Broadband, real names and tablets.

The impact of broadband is obvious; we don’t need or want anything on a slow Web. With broadband penetration at 26 percent in industrialized countries and 3G penetration at about 15 percent of the world’s population, we are just reaching critical mass of nearly 1B users on the fast Web.

Real names are more interesting. In 1993, the New Yorker ran the now famous cartoon; “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” This succinctly captured the state of the anonymous Web at the time. Reid Hoffman and Mark Zuckerberg changed that forever. Do we find Q&A on Quora to be more credible than Yahoo! Answers, celebrity profiles on Twitter more engaging than Myspace and pins on Pinterest more relevant than recommendations on early AOL chatrooms? I certainly do, and that is largely because Quora, Twitter and Pinterest take advantage of real names. Real names are blurring the distinction between online and offline behavior.

Finally, the tablet, the last necessary and sufficient piece that fuels the “Web of want.” The PC is perfect for the “Web of need” — when we need something, we can search for it, since we know what we are looking for. Searching is a “lean-forward” experience, typing into our PC, either at work or at the home office. The Web over the last decade has been optimized for this lean-forward search experience — everything from SEO to Web site design to keyword shortcuts in popular browsers makes that efficient. However, smartphones and tablets allow us to move to a “lean-back” experience, flipping through screens using our fingers, often in our living rooms and bedrooms, on the train or at the coffee shop. Tablets make discovery easy and fun, just like flipping channels on TV at leisure. These discoveries prompt us to want things we didn’t think we needed.

Early Signs
This thesis is easy to postulate, but is there any evidence that users are looking to the Web as anything more than a productivity platform? As has been reported, mobile devices now make up 20 percent of all U.S. Web traffic, and this usage peaks in the evening hours, presumably when people are away from their office. Analysis from Flurry* shows that cumulative time spent on mobile apps is closing in on TV. We certainly don’t seem to be using the Web only when we need something.

Economy of Need Versus Want
The economy of Want is different from the economy of Need. We humans tend to spend a lot more time and money on things we want compared to things we need. For example, Americans spend more than five hours a day on leisure and sports (including TV), compared to about three hours spent on eating, drinking and managing household activities. Another difference is that when it comes to satisfying our needs, we tend to settle on one provider and give that one all of our business. Think about how many companies provide us with electricity, water, milk, broadband access, search, email and identity. The Need economy is a winner-take-all market, with one or two companies dominating each need. However, when it comes to providing for our wants, we are open to being served by multiple providers. Think about how many different providers are behind the TV channels we watch, restaurants we visit, destinations we travel to and movies we watch. The Want economy can support multiple winners, each with a sizeable business. Instagram, Path, Pinterest, ShoeDazzle, BeachMint, Angry Birds, CityVille, Kixeye, Kabam, Machinima and Maker Studios can all coexist.

Investing in the Web of Want
The chart below shows that over a long term (including a global recession) an index of luxury stocks (companies such as LVMH, Burberry, BMW, Porsche, Nordstrom) outperforms an index of utility stocks (companies such as Con Edison and Pacific Gas & Electric that offer services we all need). The same applies to an index of media stocks (companies such as CBS, Comcast, News Corp., Time Warner, Viacom) which outperforms both the utilities and the broader stock market. Of course, higher returns come with higher volatility — Nordstrom’s beta is 1.6 and CBS’ beta is 2.2, compared to 0.29 for PG&E. It is this volatility that has cast investing in the Want business as a career-ending move in Silicon Valley for the past 20-plus years. As the Web evolves from serving our needs to satisfying our wants and, in turn, becomes a much larger economy, sitting on the sidelines of the Web of Want may not be an option.

Let’s Not Kill Hollywood
With a billion users looking for self-actualization and with the widespread adoption of broadband, real names and tablets, the Web is poised to become the medium for creativity, education, entertainment, fashion and the pursuit of happiness. As the offline world shows, large, profitable companies can be built that cater to these desires. Entrepreneurs and investors looking to succeed in the new new Web can learn quite a few lessons from our friends in the luxury and entertainment businesses, which have been managing profitable “want” businesses for decades. The fusion of computer science, design, data, low friction and the massive scale of the Internet can result in something that is better than what either Silicon Valley or Hollywood can do alone. It is no wonder that the team that came to this conclusion before anyone else is now managing the most valuable company in the world.

Epilogue
When we go see a movie or splurge on a resort vacation, we don’t stop using electricity, brushing our teeth or checking our email. The Web of Want is not a replacement for the Web of Need, it is an addition. Many of the Internet companies that satisfied our needs in the last 20 or more years of the Web are here to stay. In fact, they will become more entrenched and stable, with low beta, just like the utilities in the offline world. Microsoft has a beta of exactly 1.0 — it is no more volatile than the overall stock market. And for those longing for the days of “real computer science” on the Web, do not despair. Just keep an eye on Rocket Science and Google X Labs — there is plenty of hard-core engineering ahead.

Disclosures: * indicates an InterWest portfolio company. Google Finance was used for all of the stock charts and beta references.

Keval Desai is a Partner at InterWest, where he focuses on investments in early-stage companies that cater to the needs and wants of consumers. He started his career in Silicon Valley in 1991 as a software engineer. He has been a mentor and investor in AngelPad since inception. You can follow him @kevaldesai.

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From Gael Monfils of France reacting to a lost point against Radel Stepanek during the final of the Legg Mason Tennis Classic, to San Francisco Giants’ Pablo Sandoval celebrating after hitting a home run off Philadelphia Phillies’ Cole Hamels during the ninth inning. These reactions show the level of frustration and joy that athletes and coaches endure in the high pressure world of sports.

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Gael Monfils of France reacts to a lost point against Radel Stepanek of the Czech Republic during the final of the Legg Mason Tennis Classic presented by Geico at the William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center on August 7, 2011 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images) #

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Cullen Jenkins #77 of the Green Bay Packers reacts after a sack of quarterback Jay Cutler #6 of the Chicago Bears in the first half in the NFC Championship Game at Soldier Field on January 23, 2011 in Chicago, Illinois. According to reports on July 30, 2011 Jenkins has agreed to a five year deal with $25 million with the Philadelphia Eagles. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images) #

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Ana Ivanovic of Serbia reacts to a lost point against Ayumi Morita of Japan during the Bank of the West Classic at the Taube Family Tennis Stadium on July 26, 2011 in Stanford, California. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images) #

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Magdalena Neuner of Germany reacts at the finish area after the women's 15km individual race during the IBU Biathlon World Championships at A.V. Philipenko winter sports centre on March 9, 2011 in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. (Photo by Alexander Hassenstein/Bongarts/Getty Images) #

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Shelvin Mack #1 of the Butler Bulldogs reacts during their game against the Florida Gators in overtime of the Southeast regional final of the 2011 NCAA men's basketball tournament at New Orleans Arena on March 26, 2011 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images) #

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Italy's Federica Pellegrini reacts after she competed in the final of the women's 200-metre freestyle swimming event in the FINA World Championships at the indoor stadium of the Oriental Sports Center in Shanghai on July 27, 2011. She won gold. FRANCOIS XAVIER MARIT/AFP/Getty Images #

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Vera Zvonareva of Russia reacts during her second round match against Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia at the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix at Porsche Arena on April 20, 2011 in Stuttgart, Germany. (Photo by Alex Grimm/Bongarts/Getty Images) #

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Forward Kevin Durant #35 of the Oklahoma City Thunder reacts against the Memphis Grizzlies in Game Seven of the Western Conference Semifinals in the 2011 NBA Playoffs on May 15, 2011 at Oklahoma City Arena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Thunder defeated the Grizzlies to advance to the Western Conference Finals. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images) #

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Will MacKenzie reacts after missing a chip on the 18th hole during the second round of the Reno-Tahoe Open on August 5, 2011 in Reno, Nevada. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images) #

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Donald Young celebrates a point against Radek Stepanek of the Czech Republic during the semifinals of the Legg Mason Tennis Classic presented by Geico at the William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center on August 6, 2011 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images) #

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Chris Pontius #13 of D.C. United reacts after missing a shot during a soccer game against the Toronto FC at RFK Stadium on August 6, 2011 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mitchell Layton/Getty Images) #

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Matt Kemp #27 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts as he takes off his glove after hitting into an inning ending double play to end the Dodgers scoring threat against the Philadelphia Phillies during the first inning of the baseball game at Dodger Stadium on August 8, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images) #

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US swimmer Michael Phelps reacts after he competed in the final of the men's 200-metre individual medley swimming event in the FINA World Championships at the indoor stadium of the Oriental Sports Center in Shanghai on July 28, 2011. He won silver. FRANCOIS XAVIER MARIT/AFP/Getty Images #

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Scott Stallings reacts after making birdie on the first playoff hole to win The Greenbrier Classic at The Old White TPC on July 31, 2011 in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. (Photo by Hunter Martin/Getty Images) #

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Catriona Matthew of Scotland reacts after playing a bad shot to the 18th during the final round of the Women's British open at Carnoustie in Scotland on July 31 2011. ANDREW YATES/AFP/Getty Images #

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Spain's Marcel Granollers celebrates after defeating Spain's Fernado Verdasco 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 during the ATP tennis tournament on July 31, 2011 in Gstaad. SEBASTIEN FEVAL/AFP/Getty Images #

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Feyenoord's coach Ronald Koeman reacts during the Dutch Eredivisie football match Excelsior vs Feyenoord on August 5, 2011 in Rotterdam. ROBIN VAN LONKHUIJSEN/AFP/Getty Images #

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Cologne's Moroccan striker Adil Chihi reacts during the German first division Bundesliga football match FC Koeln vs VfL Wolfsburg in the western German city of Cologne on August 6, 2011. PATRIK STOLLARZ/AFP/Getty Images #

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Tiger Woods reacts after missing a birdie putt on the 8th hole during the second round of the Bridgestone Invitational golf tournament at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio Friday, Aug. 5, 2011. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan) #

 Reactions

20

France's Gregory Mallet (C) reacts as his team-mates compete in the final of the men's 4x200-metre freestyle relay swimming event in the FINA World Championships at the indoor stadium of the Oriental Sports Center in Shanghai on July 29, 2011. France won silver. FRANCOIS XAVIER MARIT/AFP/Getty Images #

 Reactions

21

Kansas City Royals' Melky Cabrera (53) reacts to being tagged out by Detroit Tigers second baseman Carlos Guillen (9) during the fourth inning of a baseball game in Kansas City, Mo., Friday, Aug. 5, 2011. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner) #

 Reactions

22

AC Milan's Thiago Silva, right, reacts after tackled by Inter Milan's Thiago Motta, left, during Italian Super Cup held at China's National Stadium, also known as the "Bird's Nest", in Beijing, China, Saturday, Aug. 6, 2011. AC Milan defeated Inter Milan 2-1. (AP Photo/Andy Wong) #

 Reactions

23

Bayfield High School's John Cusick reacts in dismay after finishing second in the 3A boys' 1600-meter run at the CHSAA State Track and Field Championships at Jefferson County Stadium in Lakewood, Colo., on Saturday, May 21, 2011. (Daniel Petty, The Denver Post) #

 Reactions

24

San Diego Padres closer Heath Bell reacts after getting the final out in the Padres' 8-3 victory over the Colorado Rockies in the ninth of a baseball game Sunday, July 31, 2011 in San Diego. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi) #

 Reactions

25

Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Ervin Santana reacts after being taken out by manager Mike Scioscia during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Seattle Mariners in Anaheim, Calif., Sunday, Aug. 7, 2011. Santana (8-8) held the Mariners to seven hits and won his duel with Mariners' Felix Hernandez (10-10), whose 12 strikeouts were one shy of his career high as the Angels won the game 2-1. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo) #

 Reactions

26

Boston University head coach Patrick Chambers reacts to play against the Kansas in the first half of a Southwest Regional NCAA tournament second round college basketball game, Friday, March 18, 2011 in Tulsa, Okla. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) #

 Reactions

27

Kentucky's Stacey Poole Jr. (2) reacts to a three point basket during the second half of an an East regional semifinal game against Ohio State in the NCAA college basketball tournament Friday, March 25, 2011, in Newark, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) #

 Reactions

28

Colorado Rapids forward Quincy Amarikwa (12) reacts to a call for Toronto FC during a 0-0 tie match at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City on Sunday, May 22, 2011. AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post #

 Reactions

29

D.A. Points reacts to a short second shot to the 8th green during the opening round at the 2011 WGC-Bridgestone Invitational at Firestone Country Club on Thursday, August 4, 2011, in Akron, Ohio. (Ed Suba Jr./Akron Beacon Journal/MCT) #

 Reactions

30

Relief pitcher Jose Valverde #46 of the Detroit Tigers celebrate after they beat the Kansas City Royals 4-3 in 10 innings at Kauffman Stadium on August 5, 2011 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images) #

 Reactions

31

Serena Williams, of the United States, reacts after defeating Marion Bartoli, of France, 7-5, 6-1 in the final of the Bank of the West Classic tennis tournament, Sunday, July 31, 2011, in Stanford, Calif. (AP Photo/George Nikitin) #

 Reactions

32

New York Yankees' Russell Martin, left, looks up as Boston Red Sox's Jacoby Ellsbury, right, reacts to his pop out with bases loaded to end the sixth inning of a baseball game in Boston, Sunday, Aug. 7, 2011. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer) #

 Reactions

33

North Korea's Mun Hyok reacts during a U-20 World Cup group F soccer match against Argentina in Medellin, Colombia, Thursday, Aug. 4, 2011. (AP Photo/Luis Benavides) #

 Reactions

34

Russia's Svetlana Kuznetsova reacts during her 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 loss to Romania's Simona Halep in the Rogers Cup tennis tournament in Toronto on Monday, Aug. 8, 2011. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Chris Young) #

 Reactions

35

Sri Lankan Ajantha Mendis celebrates after dismissing Australian Shaun Marsh during the second Twenty20 match between Sri Lanka and Australia at The Pallekele Interntional Cricket Stadium in Pallekelle on August 8, 2011. Sri Lanka defeated Australia by eight runs in the second and final Twenty20 match at the Pallekele International Stadium on Monday to clinch the series 2-0. LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI/AFP/Getty Images #

 Reactions

36

Stuttgart's headcoach Bruno Labbadia (C) celebrates as Stuttgart's Japanese forward Shinji Okazaki (not seen) scores during the German first division Bundesliga football match VfB Stuttgart vs Schalke 04 in the southern German city of Stuttgart on August 6, 2011. Stuttgart won 3-0. THOMAS KIENZLE/AFP/Getty Images #

 Reactions

37

Julia Georges of Germany celebrates her win against Jelena Jankovic of Serbia during the Rogers Cup tennis tournament on Monday, August 8, 2011 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Tyler Anderson/National Post/Postmedia News/MCT) #

 Reactions

38

Sking Superpipe Men's Finals. Aspen/Snowmass Thursday, January 27, 2011 Kevin Rolland reacts after he captures gold in the skiing superpipe. Photo by AAron Ontiveroz, The Denver Post #

 Reactions

39

Jacoby Ellsbury #2 of the Boston Red Sox and Josh Reddick #16 celebrate the win over the New York Yankees on August 6, 2011 at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts.The Boston Red Sox defeated the New York Yankees 10-4. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images) #

 Reactions

40

Netherlands Robin Haase celebrates after winning his final match against Spain's Albert Montanes at the ATP-tournament in Kitzbuehel, Austria, Saturday, Aug. 6, 2011. Haase won the match with 6-4, 4-6 and 6-1. (AP Photo/ Kerstin Joensson) #

 Reactions

41

San Francisco Giants' Pablo Sandoval celebrates after hitting a home run off Philadelphia Phillies' Cole Hamels during the ninth inning of a baseball game on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2011, in San Francisco. Sandoval had the sole Giant run of the game in a 2-1 defeat. (AP Photo/Ben Margot) #

 Reactions

42

Spain's Alvaro Vazquez (R) celebrates his goal during the FIFA U-20 World Cup football tournament match against Australia held at Palo Grande stadium in Manizales, Colombia on August 6, 2011. RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images #

 Reactions

43

New York Yankees' Brett Gardner (11) breaks his bat in frustration after striking out to end a baseball game with two men on base against the Baltimore Orioles at Yankee Stadium in New York, Friday, July 29, 2011. Baltimore won 4-2. (AP Photo/Paul J. Bereswill) #

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