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Most months, "We Are Data" would have produced a resigned nod and shake of the head, but people visiting it now have fresh reason to feel like their data is being weaponized against them. PRISM and other revelations weren’t just about what was seen — they were about the fact that when confronted with the leaks, the administration drove home how little it thought of public outrage. Watch Dogs promises a solution — but so far, it’s one that occupies an uncomfortable place between commentary and escapism.

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In 2011, Emma Coats, a now-former Pixar story artist, tweeted out a series of twenty-two storytelling tips she’d picked up during her time at Pixar.

The Internet, as is wont to do, misinterpreted Coats’ tips as ‘rules.’ Innumerable major media organizations and blogs republished Coats’ tips as the “22 Rules of Pixar Storytelling,” some even going so far as to illustrate them with stills from Pixar films. The unfortunate effect of this irresponsible distortion was that the average person now believes Coats’ tweets represent some kind of definitive rulebook about Pixar’s storytelling process.

While it may be true that Pixar, in its maturity, has slumped into formulaic story structures and characters relationships, it is still a gross mischaracterization to suggest that all of the studio’s story artists use the same playbook of warmed-over story tips.

Industry veteran Mike Bonifer, a founding producer of the Disney Channel who was instrumental in the classic documentary series Disney Family Album, has written a thoughtful corrective called “Rule #23″ that addresses the creative hazards of misreading Coats’ tweets. In his piece, Mike looks at the rules through the prism of a personal friend, Joe Ranft, Pixar’s original head of story who died tragically in a 2005 car crash.

Bonifer writes eloquently about Ranft’s approach to creativity and his refusal to put himself into a box:

When it comes to Joe Ranft, he had more than 22 games or rules, or whatever you call them. It went way, way deeper than that. He was a magician, a card-carrying member at the Magic Castle in Hollywood, so he had sleight of hand games and gestural games. A gifted mimic, he had voice and impersonation games. He had a Tell it Like James Brown Would Sing It game, a Conga Line game, a Sling Blade game, a Fake Teeth game, a Boxcar Children game, he had games for losing weight, games for raising his children, games for what to do with the money he made at Pixar. He had a game for deciding which side of the street he’d walk on. He had a game for appreciating how precious water is. He even had a game whereby he’d take a sabbatical from Pixar every few years to work with his pal, Tim Burton. No one else at Pixar could’ve gotten away with that one. See, he was a rule-breaker, and he had as much game as anyone I’ve ever known. He didn’t call them games, that I know of, although he was a Groundlings alum, and surely would’ve recognized his moves as being games in the improvisation sense. Whatever you call them, they were gifts that made things better in a thousand different ways, it didn’t matter if it was storyboarding on a Pixar film or waiting in a supermarket checkout line. Joe’s participation in it guaranteed it’d be better than it would’ve been if he had not been involved.

Bonifer goes on to suggest a perfect rule #23: “There is always another Rule.” It’s worth your time to read the entire piece, which can be found on Bonifer’s site GameChangers.com.

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This text was originally posted on my personal blog.

A while ago I stumbled upon a talk submission form for an event called The Developers' Conference. It's a gathering of people who want to learn a little bit more about topics like architecture, digital marketing, Arduino and others. Sure enough, games were going to be discussed there too.

The event was close to at least four universities that have game courses, so I thought many young faces would show up. Right after I saw the submission form, I started thinking what I could tell those people that want to be a part of the game developing scene here in Brazil. It didn't take long before I realized I wanted to share with them the things I messed up on the past two years and maybe help them be more aware of some of the tricks you can fall for when you are too eager or too optimistic to do something.

When my talk got accepted I wanted to validate my arguments with other people's own experience. That was something I didn't have time to do and this post is an attempt to fix that. What this post is not, however, is a receipt to follow blindly. Feel free to disagree with me and bring your ideas to the table.

Here's what I've come up with:

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If you build it, they will use it for sexual gratification. Or at least that's what Twitch is learning.

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NEW ARRIVAL!


BAKUSHOU YOSHIMOTO NO SHINKIGEKI

A true hidden gem, so forgive the long review. Set in Osaka complete with giant mechanical crab and Glico man, our man Kanpei stars in this platform game with variety levels and humour to match the Goemon series. The variety includes remembering which the prettiest girl on Osaka bridge is after they have jostled position for a one up. Or a dance section or ride on roller coaster both requiring fast reflexes. Or playing paper, scissors, stone and tossing a sizzling okonomiyaki pancake at the loser. Or mole bashing or rodeo riding..? The real peaches though come on the samurai themed level: slicing through bamboo mats or fighting attached to a kite. The platform sections are fun too: a walking stick power up turning you into an old man to beat everyone with the stick, or climbing up ninja grappling ropes, or jumping over raging bulls. The variety sections may require a little bit of Japanese knowledge, but are simple to work out through trial and error. Genki doesn't often compare to the seminal Goemon series, but this is real, tear jerking fun.

Publisher: Hudson Soft
Game Type: A Bit Special

Console: PC Engine Super CD ROM

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View Back Of Case


View Screen Shots

NEW ARRIVAL!


GATE OF THUNDER

Play as pilot of the Hunting Dog assisted by power ups from the Wild Cat in the shape of pods to help protect your ship. Heavy metal soundtrack, but no time for head banging apart from against the monitor as relentless waves swarm in to attack. Similar to the MD's Thunderforce and prequel to Winds of Thunder. Some very tidy rotation and parallax effects as Hudson demonstrates its perfect grasp of the Engine architecture with backgrounds that close in on you inducing claustrophobia.

Publisher: Hudson Soft
Game Type: Shoot Em Up

Console: PC Engine Super CD ROM

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