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They keep things out or enclose them within. They're symbols of power, and a means of control. They're canvases for art, backdrops for street theater, and placards for political messages. They're just waiting for when nobody's looking to receive graffiti. Walls of all kinds demarcate our lives. -- Lane Turner (41 photos total).
Note: You can now follow @bigpicture on the social network App.net, where you own your own data. If you'd like to try it out, we've also got some free invites for our readers.
Workers clean the curtain wall of the 40-story National Bank of Economic Social Development in Rio de Janeiro on December 12, 2012. (Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images)     

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Patrick Traylor

Heather Rousseau spent ten days last fall photographing and interviewing people living and working in western Colorado, documenting their relationships with the land, energy and water. “Last summer, Colorado—like much of the rest of the country—saw some of the driest and hottest conditions on record,” recalls Rousseau. “Since 80 percent of the state’s population lives [...]

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Police Car Blood Tornado Explosion Man might not be the most popular superhero out there, but he gets the job done.

In a good and just world, all promising games would get Kickstarted, and everyone would live happily ever after. Also, clothes would always feel fresh out of the laundry and chocolate would be the cure for war. Unfortunately, however, our world is not just, and calling it “good” is probably a bit of a stretch. That depressing tangent brings us to Project Awakened. It failed to pass muster on Kickstarter, in spite of promising our neither good nor just world, er, the world. But sometimes, the best ideas only spring to mind when backs are pressed firmly against the wall, and Phosphor’s certainly hatched an intriguing one. In short, it plans to gauge interest in a second crowdfunding effort, but this time it’ll run its own site and – here’s the Kickstarter-stomping kicker – declare backers “partial owners” of the property.

(more…)

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There are now over one billion automobiles on the road worldwide. An explosion in the auto markets in China and India ensures that number will increase, with China supplanting the United States as the world's largest car market. It's fair to say humanity has a love affair with the car, but it's a love-hate relationship. Cars are at once convenience, art, and menace. People write songs about their vehicles, put them in museums, race them, and wrap their identities up in them. About 15% of carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of fossil fuels comes from cars. Traffic fatality estimates vary from half a million per year to more than double that. Gathered here are images of the automobile in many forms, and our relationship to and dependence on our cars. This is the second in an occasional Big Picture series on transportation, following Pedal power earlier this year. -- Lane Turner (40 photos total)
Antti Rahko stands next to his self-made "Finnjet" during preparations for the Essen Motor Show in Essen, Germany on November 22, 2012. The car rolls on eight wheels, offers ten seats, weighs 3.4 tons and is worth about one million US dollars. (Marius Becker/AFP/Getty Images)

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girl pointing at screen

A pervasive myth exists among tech founders: If they build a product that consumers will love, it will magically trickle into Fortune 500 companies.

The logic works something like this: Devote the bulk of your funding to designing the product. CIO’s will fork over a piece of their sizable budget if enough employees get hooked and use it at work. Founders often tell me that just like cloud storage company Dropbox or enterprise social network Yammer, their product will be a hit with large organizations if it’s well-designed and easy to deploy.

Do a search for “Dropbox problem” or “Dropbox effect” and you’ll find thousands of articles. I agree that Dropbox has inspired more enterprise founders to experiment with freemium models or to build intuitive products, but it is not proof that a consumer-focused company can simply change focus to the enterprise without having to reengineer its technology from the ground up.

You can’t just ‘pivot’ to the enterprise

“Dropbox’s message is that business users want products that are simple and sexy,” said Ray Wang, the principal analyst and CEO of Constellation Research. That may be true, but according to Wang, to meet the needs of IT, you have to “do a lot more.”

For example, an enterprise startup needs a sales and support infrastructure to handle requests, and the product must be significantly more scalable and secure than a consumer product.

The “consumerization of the enterprise” trend is very real; it means that employees are embracing the latest mobile and social technology and applications, and they are bringing their own devices to work.

But this trend has not replaced traditional enterprise sales cycles. Even new-age startups like Yammer (recently acquired by Microsoft for $1.2 billion), which once spread the notion that big companies will embrace new technologies the same way that people do with consumer products, later hired a full enterprise sales and customer support team.

“It’s a beautiful story that has been spread by investors and founders,” said Mike Driscoll, the CEO of Metamarkets, a “big data startup” in San Francisco. Driscoll said that he is already on the hunt for a new sales executive, preferably with experience working for a legacy vendor like IBM or EMC.

Likewise Box, a Dropbox competitor, had to make sweeping changes before approaching the enterprise. It brought on adult supervision in the form of Whitney Tidmarsh Bouck, a former chief marketing officer at enterprise technology company EMC. To land big-name customers like The Gap and Volkswagen, Bouck said the startup needed “dedicated product marketers and resources.”

“It is our central point of focus,” she added. The product team had to incorporate scalability, integration and security controls, mobile technology, Active Directory support, and so on. Most importantly, she said, “it’s a long-term consultative sales approach that is a world apart from a consumer or SMB [small to medium-sized business] play.”

Ben Horowitz, the cofounder and general partner of Andreessen Horowitz, was one of the first venture capitalists to dispel the myth. As he put it in a blog post:

Encouraged by the new trend, innovative entrepreneurs imagine a world where consumers find great solutions to help their employers in the same way that they find great products to help themselves. In the imaginary enterprise, these individuals will then take the initiative to convince their collegues to buy the solution. Through this method, if the product is truly great, there will be little or no need to actually sell it.

The actual enterprise works a bit differently. Meet the new enterprise customer. He’s a lot like the old enterprise customer.

Indeed, when employees set up accounts for consumer-focused services without permission, the IT department is at risk of losing control over corporate data, whether it’s emails, reports, or instant-messaging chatter. However, this does not mean that the IT executives will strike deals with these tech providers to preserve security and governance.

Sand Hill is part of the problem

Greg Piesco Putnam, cofounder of Aktana, an enterprise sales startup, told me that most venture capital firms accepted the Dropbox myth without question when he was raising funds.

“They were looking for stories of the consumerization of IT, and the entrepreneurs who told those stories raised big rounds,” he recalled. ”The question that was not asked was whether IT departments would actually respond to these user demands.” He explained that in the enterprise, startups need to convince at least three key decision-makers: IT, business, and operations.

Wang told me he often hears about high-performing, early-stage consumer startups that shift gears once their investors demand to see a solid business plan. Entrepreneurs are aware that their investors are angling for a piece of the trillion-dollar market for enterprise software.

“You get folks saying, I’m going to enterprise now to cover my butt, but the product might not have been designed for that,” said Wang, who draws a useful comparison to the adoption of email programs Lotus and Outlook. The latter was widely used in the enterprise despite its design flaws. “In the enterprise, the best sales and marketing wins, not the best product,” he said.

At the Disrupt conference in San Francisco, young enterprise founders from startups like Asana contested this point, clearly demonstrating that the myth is still pervasive.

“The distribution model has changed,” Asana‘s CEO Justin Rosenstein said, and he argued that the CIO is the end-user for enterprise software. “You don’t have to be sales-driven or marketing-driven; you have to be product-driven,” Rosenstein said. “It will be the best product that wins,” he added. Asana is a task management software started by former Facebook founder Dustin Moskovitz and Rosenstein, an former Google employee.

“Nothing is relatively different, it’s just evolved,” hit back Cloudera COO Kirk Dunn. Dunn is right to advise caution: a young company will not succeed without a full customer support and sales team. In the enterprise, product simply isn’t enough. “You can have a great product and great sales-focused company,” Todd McKinnon, the CEO of cloud startup Okta, offered as a conciliatory response.

At startup demo days and hackathons, young founders are slowly waking up to the importance of traditional enterprise sales. ”At the enterprise level, a great product doesn’t sell itself; it takes a great sales and marketing organization to engage buyers, procurement organizations, and IT departments to close a large enterprise deal,” said Mark Trang, the cofounder of SocialPandas, a CRM startup that recently debuted at Founders Den.

The roots of the ‘Dropbox myth’

Dropbox is a consumer startup and wasn’t build to store and share terabytes of sensitive data for a Fortune 500 company. As VentureBeat reported earlier, with its third major security breach this year, the fast-growing private company has become a problem child for chief information officers.

“We’re consistently replacing Dropbox in the enterprise,” Vineet Jain, the CEO of enterprise cloud storage startup Egnyte, told VentureBeat. “It’s incessantly used in enterprise until IT shuts it down.”

If you are selling to consumers or small companies that behave like consumers, moving away from the old enterprise sales and channel models may make perfect sense. However, if you plan to strike multimillion-dollar deals with enterprise companies, the chief information officer is still the chief decision-maker.

In short, the Dropbox model didn’t even work for Dropbox.

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Tonight I went to the opening of ‘Impetus and Movement‘, the 3rd Ars Electronica exhibition at the Volkswagen Automobil Forum Unter den Linden in Berlin.
I was very eager to go because I knew that the installation ‘Particles‘ by Daito Manabe & Motoi Ishibashi would be there. ‘Particles’ is an illumination installation of seemingly floating lights. It’s actually a quite complex installation. Just watch the video and you’ll understand why I wanted to see it.
Unfortunately, it didn’t really work at the exhibition. I can imagine that this isn’t the easiest installation to build up.
Anyhow, there’re 11 other installations and 6 video artworks at the exhibition which make it definitely worth it. You can go and see it till September 16th and it’s free!

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