Skip navigation
Help

Whitman

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

hal380The advent of Salesforce Marketing Cloud and Adobe Marketing Cloud demonstrates the need for enterprises to develop new ways of harnessing the vast potential of big data. Yet these marketing clouds beg the question of who will help marketers, the frontline of businesses, maximize marketing spending and ROI and help their brands win in the end. Simply moving software from onsite to hosted servers does not change the capabilities marketers require — real competitive advantage stems from intelligent use of big data.

Marc Benioff, who is famous for declaring that “Software Is Dead,” may face a similar fate with his recent bets on Buddy Media and Radian6. These applications provide data to people who must then analyze, prioritize and act — often at a pace much slower than the digital world. Data, content and platform insights are too massive for mere mortals to handle without costing a fortune. Solutions that leverage big data are poised to win — freeing up people to do the strategy and content creation that is best done by humans, not machines.

Big data is too big for humans to work with, at least in the all-important analytical construct of responding to opportunities in real time — formulating efficient and timely responses to opportunities generated from your marketing cloud, or pursuing the never-ending quest for perfecting search engine optimization (SEO) and search engine marketing (SEM). The volume, velocity and veracity of raw, unstructured data is overwhelming. Big data pioneers such as Facebook and eBay have moved to massive Hadoop clusters to process their petabytes of information.

In recent years, we’ve gone from analyzing megabytes of data to working with gigabytes, and then terabytes, and then petabytes and exabytes, and beyond. Two years ago, James Rogers, writing in The Street, wrote: “It’s estimated that 1 Petabyte is equal to 20 million four-door filing cabinets full of text.” We’ve become jaded to seeing such figures. But 20 million filing cabinets? If those filing cabinets were a standard 15 inches wide, you could line them up, side by side, all the way from Seattle to New York — and back again. One would need a lot of coffee to peruse so much information, one cabinet at a time. And, a lot of marketing staff.

Of course, we have computers that do the perusing for us, but as big data gets bigger, and as analysts, marketers and others seek to do more with the massive intelligence that can be pulled from big data, we risk running into a human bottleneck. Just how much can one person — or a cubicle farm of persons — accomplish in a timely manner from the dashboard of their marketing cloud? While marketing clouds do a fine job of gathering data, it still comes down to expecting analysts and marketers to interpret and act on it — often with data that has gone out of date by the time they work with it.

Hence, big data solutions leveraging machine learning, language models and prediction, in the form of self-learning solutions that go from using algorithms for harvesting information from big data, to using algorithms to initiate actions based on the data.

Yes, this may sound a bit frightful: Removing the human from the loop. Marketers indeed need to automate some decision-making. But the human touch will still be there, doing what only people can do — creating great content that evokes emotions from consumers — and then monitoring and fine-tuning the overall performance of a system designed to take actions on the basis of big data.

This isn’t a radical idea. Programmed trading algorithms already drive significant activity across stock markets. And, of course, Amazon, eBay and Facebook have become generators of — and consummate users of — big data. Others are jumping on the bandwagon as well. RocketFuel uses big data about consumers, sites, ads and prior ad performance to optimize display advertising. Turn.com uses big data from consumer Web behavior, on-site behaviors and publisher content to create, optimize and buy advertising across the Web for display advertisers.

The big data revolution is just beginning as it moves beyond analytics. If we were building CRM again, we wouldn’t just track sales-force productivity; we’d recommend how you’re doing versus your competitors based on data across the industry. If we were building marketing automation software, we wouldn’t just capture and nurture leads generated by our clients, we’d find and attract more leads for them from across the Web. If we were building a financial application, it wouldn’t just track the financials of your company, it would compare them to public filings in your category so you could benchmark yourself and act on best practices.

Benioff is correct that there’s an undeniable trend that most marketing budgets today are betting more on social and mobile. The ability to manage social, mobile and Web analysis for better marketing has quickly become a real focus — and a big data marketing cloud is needed to do it. However, the real value and ROI comes from the ability to turn big data analysis into action, automatically. There’s clearly big value in big data, but it’s not cost-effective for any company to interpret and act on it before the trend changes or is over. Some reports find that 70 percent of marketers are concerned with making sense of the data and more than 91 percent are concerned with extracting marketing ROI from it. Incorporating big data technologies that create action means that your organization’s marketing can get smarter even while you sleep.

Raj De Datta founded BloomReach with 10 years of enterprise and entrepreneurial experience behind him. Most recently, he was an Entrepreneur-In-Residence at Mohr-Davidow Ventures. Previously, he was a Director of Product Marketing at Cisco. Raj also worked in technology investment banking at Lazard Freres. He holds a BSE in Electrical Engineering from Princeton and an MBA from Harvard Business School.

0
Your rating: None

Image via vichie81

Recently, Omar Tawakol from BlueKai wrote a fascinating article positing that more data beats better algorithms. He argued that more data trumps a better algorithm, but better still is having an algorithm that augments your data with linkages and connections, in the end creating a more robust data asset.

At Rocket Fuel, we’re big believers in the power of algorithms. This is because data, no matter how rich or augmented, is still a mostly static representation of customer interest and intent. To use data in the traditional way for Web advertising, choosing whom to show ads on the basis of the specific data segments they may be in represents one very simple choice of algorithm. But there are many others that can be strategically applied to take advantage of specific opportunities in the market, like a sudden burst of relevant ad inventory or a sudden increase in competition for consumers in a particular data segment. The algorithms can react to the changing usefulness of data, such as data that indicates interest in a specific time-sensitive event that is now past. They can also take advantage of ephemeral data not tied to individual behavior in any long-term way, such as the time of day or the context in which the person is browsing.

So while the world of data is rich, and algorithms can extend those data assets even further, the use of that data can be even more interesting and challenging, requiring extremely clever algorithms that result in significant, measurable improvements in campaign performance. Very few of these performance improvements are attributable solely to the use of more data.

For the sake of illustration, imagine you want to marry someone who will help you produce tall, healthy children. You are sequentially presented with suitors whom you have to either marry, or reject forever. Let’s say you start with only being able to look at the suitor’s height, and your simple algorithm is to “marry the first person who is over six feet tall.” How can we improve on these results? Using the “more data” strategy, we could also look at how strong they are, and set a threshold for that. Alternatively, we could use the same data but improve the algorithm: “Measure the height of the first third of the people I see, and marry the next person who is taller than all of them.” This algorithm improvement has a good chance of delivering a better result than just using more data with a simple algorithm.

Choosing opportunities to show online advertising to consumers is very much like that example, except that we’re picking millions of “suitors” each day for each advertiser, out of tens of billions of opportunities. As with the marriage challenge, we find it is most valuable to make improvements to the algorithms to help us make real-time decisions that grow increasingly optimal with each campaign.

There’s yet another dimension not covered in Omar’s article: the speed of the algorithms and data access, and the capacity of the infrastructure on which they run. The provider you work with needs to be able to make more decisions, faster, than any other players in this space. Doing that calls for a huge investment in hardware and software improvements at all layers of the stack. These investments are in some ways orthogonal to Omar’s original question: they simultaneously help optimize the performance of the algorithms, and they ensure the ability to store and process massive amounts of data.

In short, if I were told I had to either give up all the third-party data I might use, or give up my use of algorithms, I would give up the data in a heartbeat. There is plenty of relevant data captured through the passive activity of consumers interacting with Web advertising — more than enough to drive great performance for the vast majority of clients.

Mark Torrance is CTO of Rocket Fuel, which provides artificial-intelligence advertising solutions.

0
Your rating: None

This SlideShowPro photo gallery requires the Flash Player plugin and a web browser with JavaScript enabled.

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls
ESSAY CONTAINS IMPLICIT CONTENT

Michael Webster

New York

play this essay

 

The mythology of New York is known to anyone who has watched more than a dozen hours of television or skimmed magazines in a dentist’s office. But like ancient Greece, New York is too big to have a single, central story; its myth is carried by its demigods, or what in show business they call types.

Take a type we’ll call the New York Tough Guy. Now, there are tough guys all over the world; wherever you live you probably know at least one of them, and so the term “tough guy” will call him, specifically, to mind. This guy you know who talked about knocking a guy out as if it were nothing, and looked as if he could do it, is a tough guy, for instance.

But link these terms to New York and the focus shifts. The New York Tough Guy, for example, may be someone you saw perp-walked on the cover of the New York Post. Or he may be some actor who mugged a character on a movie you saw that was set in New York. He may be an antique figure with cross-hatched stubble, a lantern jaw, and a black eye-mask like the Beagle Boys wear in Scrooge McDuck comics. Maybe he’s tough in something other than a physical way. Some people (certainly not you, sophisticated reader) think Donald Trump is tough. Some people (perhaps you, sophisticated reader) think Anthony Bourdain is.

In any case, this image you’ve conjured matches the term New York Tough Guy more than the authentic avatars you actually know because there is Tough and then there is New York Tough, which may or may not be real Tough but which is certainly real New York. You almost have to imagine the Tough Guy standing defiantly against a filthy brick wall at night, harshly illuminated by car headlamps, and probably wearing shades, because all the New York Tough Guys wear shades. (Doesn’t Jay-Z? Didn’t Lou Reed?)

I’m not saying these people aren’t real tough guys, though I do think if somebody came at them with a knife a few of them might not react totally in character. I’m saying the Tough Guy, the Fast Talker, the Big Shot, the Wise-Cracking Waitress, the Hard-Bitten Journalist, et alia, are mythic figures. By that I don’t mean that they’re fake, though they often are, but that their usefulness is not to be found in the real world, but in the dream landscape that explains New York to the world and to itself.

This is why you often see people move to New York and immediately start conforming to stereotype. The pressure, whether overtly felt or only dimly sensed, of being part of something as overwhelming as New York blows the mind of anyone who does not have a perfectly solid-state personality, which is to say most of us. So citizens psychically run for cover under the robes and aegides of the demigods of New York myth.

(Where do you think hipsters  — that is to say, New York Hipsters — come from? New York magazine? Pitchfork media? They come from Patti Smith via Marlon Brando via George Cram Cook via Walt Whitman via Edgar Allan Poe via some ur-Hipster whom Peter Stuyvesant had to keep putting in the stocks for shirking.)

You and I could sit here all night identifying the constellations in the New York galaxy, but I wish to draw your attention to the least acknowledged member of the pantheon, who is nonetheless as important as any other: The Out-of-Towner.

The Out-of-Towner, aka The Greenhorn, aka The Rube, belongs to the mythology, too. His is a special role. Because one thing is true of all of the other New York demigods: They are Wised-Up. So they are all pretty evenly matched, and also extremely motivated to get over on one another. If they had only one another to deal with, things would quickly get ugly and stale — like the Manhattan of Escape from New York, an island of madmen with whom the rest of the world cannot deal.

The Out-of-Towner brings some air and light into the action. For one thing, he can be a victim, and replenish the ecosystem with whatever the wise guys can get out of him. He can be a foil, a straight man to set up their jokes and set off their unique qualities, and an audience to flatter the endless self-regard of the true New Yorker. And on occasion and with sufficient motivation, the Out-of-Towner can stick around and, if he has the moxie, become a citizen himself.

Indeed, every New Yorker who was not born there enters the town in this role, and struggles to divest himself of it. Why, for example, do New Yorkers respond so positively to being asked for directions? Because this offers them the chance to show that they’re not Out-of-Towners. (This is especially important in front of present Out-of-Towners.)

But there’s a catch. Every wise guy in New York is in perpetual danger of reverting to Out-of-Towner status. For one thing, the town is always changing — hot spots, catchphrases, top Filipino lunch places — and it’s a struggle to keep up. But more importantly, unless he has become so jaded that nothing at all matters to him anymore, the wise guy will always retain a touch of Out-of-Towner about him. The things that excited him before still excite him — though he has become of necessity very good at concealing it, lest he over-effuse and give his roots away.

All this is to begin to say what I like so much about Michael Webster’s “New York.” I do admire the formal schtick of shooting it all from the top of one of those horrible tourist double-deckers that strafe the streets (ah, there I go, sounding like a wise guy). But it’s more what the schtick reveals that pleases me. The tour bus passengers — sometimes cheaply plastic-slickered against rainy weather — seem anonymous, ordinary, like the opposite of the thing they’re observing. (And those few observed New Yorkers who notice them seem surprised but unimpressed.) But the New York vistas and tableaux that Webster sees are lovely, specific and suggestive at the same time; you could write novels about the five folks waiting for the Seventh Avenue bus, for instance, or just bask in their ennui. And the wonderful thing is, they are as available to those bus-riding Out-of-Towners as they are to anyone else. Like those two well-dressed Indian folks in the front row: They certainly look like they’re enjoying the scene. Maybe they, too, see in New York what we see. Or maybe — you know, we can hardly admit it, even now — they see more.

– Roy Edroso

 

 

Bio

Michael Webster is a photographer currently living in Brooklyn.

 

Related links

Michael Webster

Roy Edroso

0
Your rating: None

Opening tonight in Berlin, This Land Was Made for You and Me explores the idea of America, through the eyes of young American photographers. The title is taken from the Woody Guthrie song This Land Is Your Land, which was written as a critical retort to Irving Berlin’s saccharine God Bless America. Guthrie meant for his song to present not just the scenic landscape of the country, but also the social realities. The show looks to explore those present day realities: particularly the experience of being young, right now, in the USA.

When the curators asked if we would want to cover it for the site, I realized that although I knew the title, and the basic premise, I didn’t know much about their thinking behind the show. So I emailed them a few questions, which are answered below.

Skye Parrott: You guys curated a show that I contributed to that is opening in Berlin this week. The theme is America. Does that mean American photographers in particular, or just America as an idea? What is your idea of America?

Ann-Kathrin Obermeyer: The idea is about American photographers and photographers living in America. When I moved to America, I wasn’t surprised because everything was just like in the movies. Although it took me quite a while to feel really comfortable. Being German/European means it’s not always easy, since we lack the openness which America’s culture is based on. I feel so much richer now after succeeding and adjusting.

Adrian Crispin: I grew up in New York and New Jersey, so for me America has always been about the outsiders, the hero/antihero of subculture. Whitman, Steven Segal, etc.

Skye: I find one of the strangest things about being American that wherever you go in the world, your culture has been accessed by people via movies and television. How much has your idea of America been influence by those mediums?

Adrian: I think movies and TV are quintessentially American and equally important in the shaping and informing of my visual background.

Skye: Adrian, you’re a photographer, and Ann-Kathrin, you’re a stylist. How did the idea come about to curate this show? Has either of you ever curated anything before?

Adrian: We were asked by the gallery director, Kirsten Hermann, to curate a show based on our American experience. Despite having no prior curatorial experience , we both know what we respond to and decided to just do it.

Skye: I’ve curated a couple of shows and really enjoyed it. It feels like putting together pieces of a puzzle. How did you go about picking the photographers for this show? How about the specific images?

Ann-Kathrin: It was a long process of looking at lots of people’s work from all different types of backgrounds until we finally narrowed down the selection of photographers whose work we really responded to and then proceeded to choose images that would work together as a group either as a complimentary dialogue with each other or as counterbalance in opposition.

Skye: You’re a couple, right? How do you find the process of working together while being in a relationship?

Adrian: Yes, we are a couple. We met in Paris at a museum bookshop. I was looking at art books and Ann-Kathrin was looking at fashion magazines. We have a very natural, intuitive, and complimentary way of collaborating from grocery shopping to doing editorials together.

Skye: Do you have plans to curate any more shows together? What would be your dream space to curate something in? Who would be part of that show?

Adrian: It has been a great experience and was a lot of work but now that we are almost at the end and about to physically put everything on the wall.

Ann Kathrin: I would do it again any time. I think a dream space would be the MoMa and also a dream (we were always thinking about this) would be having shows in our apartment with some good food. I definitely would ask Juergen Teller to be a part of it.

Adrian: There is a lot of really talented people out there whose work remains to be seen, so I would include the unknowns.

This Land Was Made for You and Me opens Thursday, April 26 from 7-9 pm at the Galerie fuer Moderne Fotografie, Schroederstrasse 13, Berlin, and runs through June 9.

Top image: RJ Shaughnessy, Black Kid, Afro; Middle image: Anna Moller, Rooster, 2009; Bottom image: Grant Willing, Untitled (Capri Sun), 2009

0
Your rating: None