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The folks at MYISH put together two beautiful talents in the video above: Hikakin, a beatboxer based in Japan, and Marquese Scott a.k.a. Nonstop, a US dancer from Georgia who achieved viral fame in this 2011 video. They're both absolutely amazing, and together, man: what a beautiful collaboration. You'll be able to watch this in-flight on the Boing Boing Virgin America television channel, along with other great Japan beatboxing videos from MYISH.

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Boing Boing reader Cory Poole is a 33-year-old math and science teacher at University Preparatory School in Redding, CA. He sends in this beautiful video of yesterday's annular solar eclipse, and says:

This is a 60 second time-lapse video made from 700 individual frames through a Coronado Solar Max 60 Double Stacked Hydrogen Alpha Solar Telescope. The pictures were shot in Redding, CA, which was directly in the annular eclipse path. The filter on the telescope allows you to see the chromosphere which is a layer that contains solar prominences. The filter only allows light that is created when hydrogen atoms go from the 2nd excited state to the 1st excited state.

 

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There's a feature worth reading in the New York Times today by John Hanc on the role that meditation plays in brain development, and scientific studies to explore "the extent to which meditation may affect neuroplasticity — the ability of the brain to make physiological change."

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LIFE.com has a beautiful gallery of Michael Rougier photographs from Japan in 1964: runaways, rock and rollers, biker gangs, "pill kids" and other Japanese teens. LIFE Magazine published some of these in September, 1964, but some have never before been published.

Above, the original caption from 1964: "Kako, languid from sleeping pills she takes, is lost in a world of her own in a jazz shop in Tokyo."

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In Mother Jones, an article exploring some of the sexist excesses of Silicon Valley's male-dominant programmer culture. None of this is news to those of us (and by us, I mean women) who've worked there—but the article contains some hilarious/horrible frat-boy anecdotes. And, no, not all male programmers behave like this, yada yada yada. (via @clarajeffery)

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Can't wait to get my hands on this forthcoming Taschen title, by art historian and art editor Sandra Rendgen; with graphic designer and editor Julius Wiedemann: Information Graphics. The book explores the visual communication of data, and the "massive flow of information that we must interpret in order to understand the world we live in," featuring work from masters of the profession.

From the book description: "The in-depth introductory section, illustrated with over 60 images (each accompanied by an explanatory caption), features essays by Sandra Rendgen, Paolo Ciuccarelli,Richard Saul Wurman, and Simon Rogers; looking back all the way to primitive cave paintings as a means of communication, this introductory section gives readers an excellent overview of the subject."

More than 200 projects and 400 examples of contemporary information graphics from around the world, and a nifty poster (673 x 475 mm / 26.5 x 18.7 in) by former TIME graphics director Nigel Holmes.

Do want. Amazon pre-order link (comes out March 20). More about the book, and images from inside, at Taschen.com.

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Watch the first-ever live global debate on the War on Drugs today on Google+, hosted by Virgin CEO Sir Richard Branson at 7pm GMT/ 2pm EST. Details on the webcast here.

Participants will include...

Julian Assange; Russell Brand and Misha Glenny; Geoffrey Robertson and Eliot Spitzer: experts, orators and celebrities who’ve made this their cause, are set to lock horns in a new debate format. Some of our speakers will be on stage in London's Kings Place in front of a ticketed audience, and others will join in from Mexico City, São Paulo or New Orleans, made possible through Google+ Hangouts; a live multi-person video platform.

About the content of the debate, Branson writes:

We’ve carried out two surveys in the last two weeks, one where we asked Twitter, Facebook and Google+ users globally whether they thought the war on drugs had failed, and one UK-specific survey through YouGov.In the global online poll, 91% agreed that the war on drugs has failed. Over 90% also thought that providing treatment for addiction would be a better approach than putting people in jail.Meanwhile, over 95% of 12,090 people surveyed online globally think governments should open the debate to look for other ways then jail to solve the drugs issue. More than 81% of people surveyed globally also agreed that drug use would decrease if governments focused on treatment and stopped putting people in jail for minor drug offences.

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