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Edgar Camago, aka DJ Overeasy, did an amazing Breaking Bad remix video we featured recently on Boing Boing. Edgar also teaches third grade at a school in San Francisco.

"My class recently created a song using nothing but objects and sounds found in the classroom or in school," Edgar says. And here's the resulting video.

"Any money made off of YouTube will be donated to my school," Edgar says.

He's on Facebook, and YouTube.

More about the video, below.

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What if you could compile all of YouTube's worst-rated videos in one place? Considering the sheer volume of user content that's uploaded to the site every second, it's a daunting challenge. Nonetheless, that's the idea Boootube is trying to execute on; it's a running collection of the most down-voted clips on YouTube. In other words, it's the best of the worst; these are videos that have received hundreds and often times thousands of unfavorable votes from viewers around the world.

Selections include Lil Wayne trying his hand at guitar, controversial baby yoga demonstrations, and an expletive-laced rant targeted at an innocent Dunkin Donuts staffer. Unflattering political ads and blatantly racist rants are also a common theme. There's also a 15-minute video where the clip's host uses Photoshop to prove that the "original" Eminem died only to be quietly replaced by a lookalike. We're all familiar with the overnight sensations and stars that have been catapulted to glory thanks to YouTube. But BooTube serves as a sober reminder that the good is often outweighed by the bad or mediocre.

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Technically, 2012 marked the 25th anniversary of Street Fighter, the classic Capcom fighting game franchise that's made a comeback over the past few years. This weekend, however, Capcom has made "I Am Street Fighter," a 72-minute documentary film, available to stream free on YouTube. Originally only available as part of the $149.99 Street Fighter 25th Anniversary Collection, the film traces Street Fighter all the way back to its roots, through the glory days of the arcade, and finally to today's tournament scene, where pro players can make a name for themselves internationally.

Listen to directors and players of the original Street Fighter talk about the series' humble origins, see life-long fans share their stories, their art, and their collections of Street Fighter games, hear former Capcom community manager Seth Killian explain the game's intricacies, and see famous professional players Justin Wong and Daigo Umehara explain the epic conclusion of one of the most infamous showdowns in fighting game history.

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Since The Internet welcomes all kinds of feelings, come find yourself in Sensi Sessions. Each Sensi Session offers a monthly roundup of music that's slightly sensitive; here you'll find music that goes from the vibe of Rich Homie Quan's "Type of Way" to deep thoughts in minimal dance music. Sensi is whatever you let it be, and this month's selection ranges from weirdo pop from Australian-born Martin King, Drake vs Jhené Aiko and a Le1f cut that goes extra deep.

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Bismillah writes "University of Bristol researchers have come up with a way to make touch screens more touchy-feely so to speak, using ultrasound waves to produce haptic feedback. You don't need to touch the screen even, as the UltraHaptics waves can be felt mid-air. Very Minority Report, but cooler."

The researchers built an ultrasonic transducer grid behind an acoustically transparent display. Using acoustic modeling of a volume above the screen, they can create multiple movable control points with varying properties. A Leap Motion controller was used to detect the hand movements.

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YouTube has been an existence-proof of forms of video that were lurking in potentia, unable to come into existence due to limitations of the distribution channel. The two-to-three-minute video has now been firmly established as a genre (with the six-second video hot on its heels), but there's plenty of room at the long end of the scale. Case in point: subculture of YouTubers who post full-length train journeys, hours and hours' worth -- and if that's not long-form enough, how about 134-hour sea crossings?

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Recently, the YouTube show Extra Credits make a video about the issue of narrative in competitive games. Its a really interesting topic and I invite you to take a gander to get a better idea of what I'm about to talk about.

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