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By JAMES ESTRIN

David Alan Harvey has documented Brazil many times before, but in "(based on a true story)," he nakedly reveals his thoughts and experiences in a tale of passion, mystery and danger.

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Andrei Becheru

The Fountain

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I think you come to grasp a place better when you spend a considerable amount of time there; by seeing and listening to everything around you, you develop a constant connection, you react to it, and then, in the end, you distil everything; in my case, with images.

But, first of all, it needs to be a place where everything is found in abundance. It must be a wild territory. A piece of land with a vast history, a land that still bears the mark of past colonizations. A land battered by the tumultuous feet of several generations who lived, fought and died in this place.

When I started (around 2009), I did not view this material in the form of a project. I was traveling in the South of the country where I live, Romania, I had been exploring photography for two years already when I begun to gradually discover this place called Dobruja.

I had read some material, I had seen some documentaries about the Danube Delta, about the hardships which the people inhabiting this area have become accustomed to, or not. I came to know the story of a mining town built in Romania’s Communist era, hidden behind sedimented hills used for copper extractions.

It is difficult to approach the topic surrounding the prosperity of this mining town in the Socialist era, at this point, but one can track down the drastic consequences brought about by the Post-Communist period, consequences mirrored in the people who remained here, on this land ravaged by the effects of industrialization.

After more than a year of exploring this place and starting from a few “trigger” images which illustrate this scenery, I had the impression that I was beginning to discover and approach different subjects. I thought that these images made up a beginning of something that might subsequently crystallize into individual projects. I continued to photograph the day to day life in this scenery. I was conscious of the diversity of the images gathered, but I could not contain them; I felt the need to spread them out.

 

Bio

I, Andrei Becheru, was born in 1984 in Bucharest, Romania.

From early on I chose drawing and painting as means of expression. I completed my studies in the field of design at the National University of Fine Arts of Bucharest in 2007. Absorbed by a past aspiration, which, in the meantime, had become an inner necessity, I started taking photographs three years ago, first on film, and then adopting the digital medium.

One year into digital photography, I nostalgically returned to images on photographic film that had marked my memory.

Presently, I work as an art director for an online fashion store. In parallel with film photography, I began experimenting with moving pictures using an old video camera.

 

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Kadir van Lohuizen

Vía PanAm

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In 2011, Kadir started a visual investigation on migration in the Americas.

In 12 months, he traveled along the Pan-American Highway from Terra del Fuego in Patagonia to Deadhorse in Northern Alaska.
Vía PanAm is a unique social documentary MULTI MEDIA project made into an iApp for the iPad.

 

Bio

Before Kadir van Lohuizen (The Netherlands, 1963) became a photographer, he was a sailor and started a shelter for homeless and drug addicts in Holland. He was also an activist in the Dutch squatter movement.

He started to work as a professional freelance photojournalist in 1988 covering the Intifada. In the years following, he worked in many conflict areas in Africa, such as Angola, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, Liberia and the DR of Congo. From 1990 to 1994 he covered the transition in South Africa from apartheid to democracy.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Kadir covered social issues in different corners of the former empire. He also went to North Korea and Mongolia. In 1997 he embarked on a big project to travel along the seven rivers of the world, from source to mouth, covering daily life along these lifelines. The project resulted in the book “Rivers” and “Aderen” (Mets & Schilt).

In 2000 and 2002 Kadir was a jury member of the World Press Photo contest.

In 2004 he went back to Angola, Sierra Leone and the DR of Congo to portray the diamond industry, following the diamonds from the mines to the consumer markets in the Western world. The exhibitions that resulted from this project were not only shown in Europe and the USA, but also in the mining areas of Congo, Angola and Sierra Leone. The photo book “Diamond Matters, the diamond industry” was published by Mets & Schilt (Holland), Dewi Lewis (UK) and Umbrage editions (USA) and awarded with the prestigious Dutch Dick Scherpenzeel Prize for best reporting on the developing world and a World Press Photo Award.

In that same year, Kadir initiated a photo project together with Stanley Greene and six other photographers on the issue of violence against women in the world.

In 2006 he launched a magazine called Katrina – An Unnatural Disaster, The Issue # 1, in collaboration with Stanley Greene, Thomas Dworzak and Paolo Pellegrin with an essay by Jon Lee Anderson.

After hurricane Katrina destroyed New Orleans, he has made several trips to the USA to document the aftermath of the storm. In the summer of 2010, to mark the fifth commemoration of Hurricane Katrina, Kadir exhibited images of Katrina’s devastation and the aftermath in a truck-exhibition that drove from Houston to New Orleans, a project in collaboration with Stanley Greene.

Kadir is a frequent lecturer and photography teacher; he’s a member and co-founder of NOOR picture agency and foundation and is based in Amsterdam.

 

Related links

Vía PanAm

Twitter

NOOR

 

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Since the late 19th century, photographers have honed their craft to expose social and political truths existing in their surroundings. The use of collage has expanded on this exploration by allowing artists to reconfigure, cut and fragment photos to create entirely new images and conversations

Utopia/Dystopia: Construction and Destruction in Photography and Collage, a new exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston (MFAH), features 150 years of collage, as well as photomontages and moving images, to present “alternative realities” of utopia or dystopia.

The exhibit has more than 100 works, from as early as the 1860s to the present, with origins spanning Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe. The show is organized around three themes: urban visions, figure construction and the quest for a utopian world, and contains pieces drawn from four museums and private holdings.

Utopia/Dystopia is the brainchild of MFAH associate photography curator, Yasufumi Nakamori. “In breaking and reassembling found images to create a new vision, artists have found collage and montage ideal for expressing utopian dreams and dystopian anxieties,” said Nakamori. Featured artists include El Lissitzky, Okanoue Toshiko, Herbert Bayer, Matthew Buckingham, Tom Thayer, among others, and although their work stems from different artistic movements—from Dada to Constructivism—all the artists embrace the compelling process of photography construction and destruction.

Utopia/Dystopia will be on display through June 10 as part of the FotoFest 2012 Biennial, the largest international photography festival in the U.S. 

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Photographer Benjamin Drummond and writer Sara Joy Steele work as a documentary team, producing top-notch audio, video, research and still photography looking at environmental issues facing people around the world. Their ongoing, award-winning project Facing Climate Change examines how global environmental changes are affecting people in localized ways. The images in this gallery are from a recent collaboration with the Conservation International–a new global camera mammal study that seeks to provide data on species from protected areas in the Americas, Africa and Asia. A total of 420 cameras were placed around the world, with 60 motion-activated cameras set up in each site at a density of one per every two square kilometers for a month in each site.

“What makes this study scientifically groundbreaking is that we created for the first time consistent, comparable information for mammals on a global scale setting an effective baseline to monitor change. By using this single, standardized methodology in the years to come and comparing the data we receive, we will be able to see trends in mammal communities and take specific, targeted action to save them”, said Dr. Jorge Ahumada, ecologist with the Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring Network at Conservation International, noting that 2010 cameras have been installed in new places, expanding the monitoring network to 17 sites (Panama, Ecuador, another site in Brazil, two sites in Peru, Madagascar, Congo, Cameroon, Malaysia and India). “Without a systematic, global approach to monitoring these animals and making sure the data gets to people making decisions, we are only recording their extinctions, not actually saving them.” To see a gallery of remarkable images made with the motion activated cameras in the study, click here.

Photos by Benjamin Drummond, August, 2011

The first global camera trap mammal study has documented 105 species in nearly 52,000 images from seven protected areas across the Americas, Africa and Asia. In the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania, field technicians hike cross-country to install a motion-triggered camera.

At each research site, 60 cameras are placed on a grid of one camera per two square kilometers. The photographic data helped scientists confirm that habitat loss has a direct and detrimental impact on the diversity and survival of mammal populations.

Tanzania field technicians Steven Shinyambala, Emanuel Martin, and Aggrey Uisso check the alignment of a newly set camera trap in Udzungwa National Park.

Each camera will run day and night for 30 days to photograph passing mammals and birds. The study is the first to collect comparable information on mammals at a global scale and provides a baseline to monitor change.

The forests of Tanzania’s Udzungwa Mountains provide a critical source of water to surrounding rice and sugarcane fields. The camera trap data helps scientists understand how mammals are impacted by local, regional and global threats such as overhunting, conversion of land to agriculture and climate change.

This African leopard, a threatened species, was captured by a camera trap in Tanzania’s Udzungwa Mountains. This image is one of nearly 52,000 photos taken as part of the first global camera trap mammal study.

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