Skip navigation
Help

Latin America

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Ten years ago, the International Labor Organization (ILO) established June 12 as World Day Against Child Labor. The ILO, an agency of the United Nations, says on its website: "Hundreds of millions of girls and boys throughout the world are engaged in work that deprives them of adequate education, health, leisure and basic freedoms, violating their rights." The World Day Against Child Labor was launched as a way to highlight the plight of these children and support governments and social organizations in their campaigns against child labor. [37 photos]

The rough hands of an Afghan child, at the Sadat Ltd. Brick factory, where some children work from 8am to 5 pm daily, seen on May 14, 2010 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Child labor is common at the brick factories where the parents work as laborers, desperate to make more money enlisting their children to help doing the easy jobs. (Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)

0
Your rating: None

Pope Benedict XVI is back in Rome following his week-long-travels to Mexico and Cuba. In reviewing almost 4,000 images that documented his historic travels to the two countries, I decided to concentrate on Cuba, a country that because of travel restrictions, still remains a bit of a mystery to most of us. The first image, though, shows the Pope traveling to Cristo Rey sanctuary in Mexico to lead the holy mass celebration. The Pope urged the faithful to seek a humble and pure heart and trust in God in the face of evil. While in Cuba, in the heart of Revolution Square, with the towering images of guerrilla heroes staring back at him, the Pope called for "authentic freedom" in one of the world's most authoritarian states. Benedict's visit comes 14 years after the historic first papal trip to Cuba by Pope John Paul II, a visit that yielded an era of greater religious expression. – Paula Nelson (50 photos total)
Pope Benedict XVI looks from the helicopter at the Cristo Rey sanctuary as arrives to lead the holy mass celebration at the Parque del Bicentenario in Silao, March 25, 2012. Pope Benedict XVI sought to boost the Catholic faith in the face of violence and other challenges on his first visit to Mexico, receiving eager support from vast crowds of Mexicans. (Osservatore Romano/AFP/Getty Images)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

Wenceslao Casares

Wences Casares is a serial entrepreneur from Patagonia, Argentina.

Before starting Lemon, a company that stores your receipts and makes transactions more transparent, Casares co-founded Bling Nation and Lemon Bank, a Brazilian retail bank for poor.

He also started Wanako Games. He's had over a billion dollars in startup exits.

He moved to the states in 1999 and the Bay Area in 2007. However, most of his startup experience has been in Latin America.

The reason: While ideas are plentiful in Silicon Valley, engineers ready to risk their careers on startups are not.

"The best engineers are at Google and other big companies and don't want to take the risk [of starting a company or joining a startup]," he added.

That's why he goes outside of Silicon Valley to hire bright engineers. He mainly goes to Latin America, because he has a network of engineers there.

He says he's already made more than 30 engineers into millionaires in Latin America. That's why when they get an offer from him, they tend to take it.

"Someone who grows up in that environment in [a country like] Thailand, Brazil, or Turkey, the environment is so chaotic. You don't get that sense of security. You know that everything can change. You don't get that offer from Google. They aren't necessarily risk takers, but are more okay with risk," he said.

In Brazil, he created a bank for the poor, by setting up lean branches. He noticed, the poor all had a mobile phone, but no bank account. That's when he started thinking about how to keep money on your phone, rather than keeping everything in your wallet.

That experience inspired him to found Lemon, which uses the phone to help people keep track of their expenses and hopefully manage their bank account without effort.

Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:

0
Your rating: None


TEDxTapaeGate - Mervyn Levin - 3D Printing - Convergence of the Digital and Physical Worlds

Mervyn Levin is Founding Director of Levering Ltd, a UK-based consultancy for the digital and creative industries with clients in Europe and Asia. Mervyn is also an Honorary Research Fellow at University of Sheffield and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in the UK. He was Head of Digital Content Policy in UK Government between 2002-2007. Prior to that, he worked for Reuters in senior management positions across Europe and Latin America for over 20 years. He was born and educated in South Africa and has an undiminished passion for travel. He spends a large amount of time in Chiang Mai where he keeps a home. His talk "3D Printing - Convergence of the Digital and Physical Worlds and the impact on the Creative Industries" will focus on how 3D Printing represents a highly promising opportunity to grow digital industries and to use digital technologies to make existing industries more competitive.
From:
TEDxTalks
Views:
91

3
ratings
Time:
16:28
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None

Tomorrow, March 22, is World Water Day, an event established by the United Nations in 1993 to highlight the challenges associated with this precious resource. Each year has a theme, and this year's is "Water and Food Security." The UN estimates that more than one in six people worldwide lack access to 20-50 liters (5-13 gallons) of safe freshwater a day to ensure their basic needs for drinking, cooking, and cleaning. And as the world's population grows beyond 7 billion, clean water is growing scarcer in densely populated areas as well as in remote villages. Collected here are recent images showing water in our lives -- how we use it, abuse it, and depend on it. [36 photos]

A journalist takes a sample of polluted red water from the Jianhe River in Luoyang, Henan province, China, on December 13, 2011. According to local media, the sources of the pollution were two illegal chemical plants discharging their production wastewater into the rain sewer pipes. (Reuters/China Daily)

0
Your rating: None

A Honduran fire and a Mexican massacre have drawn new attention to deteriorating conditions at prisons in Latin America. Many of the prisons are stuffed over capacity, leaving inmates to string hammocks from the ceiling or bed down on the floor. Members of a gang known as the Mara 18 crowd into cells at the [...]

0
Your rating: None

A last blast before the observance of Lent, Carnival has evolved in many parts of the world with Christian traditions to be the biggest party of the year. Traditions vary from country to country, and even from region to region, but most places celebrate with a parade filled with masks, music, and ecstatic revelers. The world's biggest party happens in Rio de Janeiro, where millions fill the streets as the parade enters the Sambadrome. Collected here are pictures of Carnival in many forms as celebrated in various parts of Europe, Latin America, and North America. -- Lane Turner (41 photos total)
A performer from the Beija Flor samba school parades during Carnival celebrations at the Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro on Feb. 20, 2012. Millions watched the sequin-clad samba dancers at Rio de Janeiro's iconic Carnival parade. (Silvia Izquierdo/Associated Press)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None