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A potentially catastrophic food crisis in the Sahel region of West and Central Africa could affect as many as one million children. The food and nutrition crisis resulting from a severe drought, threatens the survival of an entire generation of children. Those children in eight countries - Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania and Niger, Cameroon, Nigeria and Senegal - are at risk of severe acute malnutrition. Sparse rainfall, poor harvests and rising food prices have left many vulnerable and weak, seeking medical attention. Sahel is one of the poorest regions in the world where children already face daunting odds of survival. The current crisis makes their survival even more tenuous. Associated Press photographer, Ben Curtis, documented the conditions in the region. -- Paula Nelson (EDITORS NOTE: We will not be posting Monday, May 14) (32 photos total)
A woman carries her child amidst dusty winds in the desert near Mondo, a village in the Sahel belt of Chad, April 19, 2012. UNICEF estimates that 127,000 children under the age of 5 in Chad's Sahel belt will require lifesaving treatment for severe acute malnutrition this year, with an estimated 1 million expected throughout the wider Sahel region of West and Central Africa in the countries of Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Chad, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal and Mauritania. (Ben Curtis/Associated Press)

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TEDxVillanovaU - Michele Pistone - The Future of Higher Education

This talk discusses the future of higher education, which has been based on the same educational model for more than 100 years. But the status quo is about to be disrupted, by the Internet and those educators -- including new competitors -- who would unleash its potential. Higher education institutions at a whole have not adequately recognized the threat to the status quo, or come close to responding adequately to it. In truth, responding adequately will be very difficult, because higher ed face a classic innovator's dilemma. Michele Pistone guides law students as they evolve from student to lawyer at the Villanova School of Law. She founded its current clinical program and is the Director of the Clinic for Asylum, Refugee and Emigrant Services (CARES). Through CARES she and her students provide free legal representation to asylum seekers fleeing persecution, torture, unlawful imprisonment and other forms of mistreatment. Her clinic's clients are survivors of human rights abuses directed at them because of their religion, their political opinions, or other beliefs and characteristics that we as a nation have always sought to protect. Among the clients that she has represented are former child soldiers from Sierra Leone and Uganda; political dissidents from Belarus, Cameroon, and Afghanistan; women's rights activists from Nepal and Kenya; children's rights activists from Peru; and religious minorities from Iraq; among countless others. She is a lifetime learner, always <b>...</b>
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Photographer Benjamin Drummond and writer Sara Joy Steele work as a documentary team, producing top-notch audio, video, research and still photography looking at environmental issues facing people around the world. Their ongoing, award-winning project Facing Climate Change examines how global environmental changes are affecting people in localized ways. The images in this gallery are from a recent collaboration with the Conservation International–a new global camera mammal study that seeks to provide data on species from protected areas in the Americas, Africa and Asia. A total of 420 cameras were placed around the world, with 60 motion-activated cameras set up in each site at a density of one per every two square kilometers for a month in each site.

“What makes this study scientifically groundbreaking is that we created for the first time consistent, comparable information for mammals on a global scale setting an effective baseline to monitor change. By using this single, standardized methodology in the years to come and comparing the data we receive, we will be able to see trends in mammal communities and take specific, targeted action to save them”, said Dr. Jorge Ahumada, ecologist with the Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring Network at Conservation International, noting that 2010 cameras have been installed in new places, expanding the monitoring network to 17 sites (Panama, Ecuador, another site in Brazil, two sites in Peru, Madagascar, Congo, Cameroon, Malaysia and India). “Without a systematic, global approach to monitoring these animals and making sure the data gets to people making decisions, we are only recording their extinctions, not actually saving them.” To see a gallery of remarkable images made with the motion activated cameras in the study, click here.

Photos by Benjamin Drummond, August, 2011

The first global camera trap mammal study has documented 105 species in nearly 52,000 images from seven protected areas across the Americas, Africa and Asia. In the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania, field technicians hike cross-country to install a motion-triggered camera.

At each research site, 60 cameras are placed on a grid of one camera per two square kilometers. The photographic data helped scientists confirm that habitat loss has a direct and detrimental impact on the diversity and survival of mammal populations.

Tanzania field technicians Steven Shinyambala, Emanuel Martin, and Aggrey Uisso check the alignment of a newly set camera trap in Udzungwa National Park.

Each camera will run day and night for 30 days to photograph passing mammals and birds. The study is the first to collect comparable information on mammals at a global scale and provides a baseline to monitor change.

The forests of Tanzania’s Udzungwa Mountains provide a critical source of water to surrounding rice and sugarcane fields. The camera trap data helps scientists understand how mammals are impacted by local, regional and global threats such as overhunting, conversion of land to agriculture and climate change.

This African leopard, a threatened species, was captured by a camera trap in Tanzania’s Udzungwa Mountains. This image is one of nearly 52,000 photos taken as part of the first global camera trap mammal study.

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There's still time! The deadline for entries for this year's National Geographic Photo Contest is November 30. Photographers of all skill levels (last year more than 16,000 images submitted by photographers from 130 countries) enter photographs in three categories: Nature, People and Places. The photographs are judged on creativity and photographic quality by a panel of experts. There is one first place winner in each category and a grand prize winner as well. The following is a selection of 54 entries from each of the 3 categories. The caption information is provided and written by the individual photographer. -- Paula Nelson (54 photos total)
LONE TREE YELLOWSTONE: A solitary tree surviving another harsh winter in Yellowstone National Park. Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. (Photo and caption by Anita Erdmann/Nature/National Geographic Photo Contest)

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As pretty much always…let’s start with some features….today’s around the world trip starts with Andrea Bruce’s work from Afghanistan… then we’ll head to Haiti with Jonathan Torgovnik, and to Florida with Anthony Suau…

Features and Essays - Andrea Bruce: Taliban Threat (VII Network: December 2010) Province of Faryab in northern Afghanistan

Features and Essays - Jonathan Torgovnik: La Piste Tent Camp (Reportage by Getty Images: December 2010) Haiti

Features and Essays – Anthony Suau: Florida Foreclosure Fraud Crisis 2010 (Facingchange.org: 2010)

Next to Palestine with Ladefoged…then to Bali with Stanmeyer, followed by Cameroon with Bouvet and New Jersey with Abdulaziz….

Features and Essays - Joachim Ladefoged: Growing Up Palestinian in the Age of the Wall (VII: December 2010)

Features and Essays – John Stanmeyer: Bali (New Yorker Photo Booth: December 2010)

Features and Essays - Eric Bouvet: Cholera in Cameroon (VII Network: December 2010)

Features and Essays – Mustafah Abdulaziz: New Jersey Bear Hunt (WSJ: December 2010)

Yesterday saw big student protests (Panos Pictures coverage | NYT slidehow) in London against the government’s plans to increase university tuition fees… I was at Parliament Square covering the event myself,  and I have to say that it is a bit sad too see  all the media coverage today concentrating almost solely on the rioters who attacked Prince Charles’ Rolls-Royce on Regent Street as well as the violence done to Treasury and Supreme Court buildings surrounding the Parliament Square…and the large majority of demonstrators who were entirely peaceful in their protest, barely getting a mention…  I disagree with the Metropolitan Police policy on kettling those obviously peaceful protestors… who last night were kettled until  8.30pm at the Square, and after it started looking like they were finally being let out, it turned out they were actually only pushed to the Westminster Bridge, where everybody felt like sardins in a tin… I know as I was there kettled with them until 10.30….

Matt Dunham from Associated Press hit the jackpot with his photo of Charles’ and Camilla’s limo being attacked…In Boston Globe Big Picture you can see it full frame…

Most media went for the crop…

In Guardian, he tells you how he got the shot….

Articles/Interviews – Guardian: How AP’s photographer got ‘the money shot’ of Charles and Camilla (Guardian: December 2010)

I happened to notice, by the way, Brighton’s own Simon Roberts work his 5×4 magic behind the police lines at Parliament Square yesterday…. which reminds me that according to his Twitter feed , @simoncroberts, he has new assistant, Harry….

PhotographersHarry Watts

Mathias, whose work I featured on Tuesday’s post, got featured on Verve Photo on Wednesday…

Articles – Verve Photo: Mathias Depardon (Verve: December 2010)

One of my Panos faves, Ian Teh is featured in Verve today with a photo from the Merging Boundaries series I was raving about last week…

Articles - Verve Photo: Ian Teh (Verve: December 2010)

Articles – Guardian: Photographer Pietro Masturzo’s best shot (Guardian: December 2010)

Big news…

Articles – BJP: VII outsources distribution to Corbis (BJP: December 2010)

One of my Perpignan flatmates Sebastian Liste, won yet another award…

Articles – BJP: Terry O’Neill Award goes to Sebastian Liste (BJP: December 2010)

Sebastian is also one of the Fotovisura shortlisted…

GrantsFotovisura grant finalists

Format festival got pre-launched in London couple of days ago and the website is now live…

FestivalsFormat International Photography Festival

Articles - Guardian: Featured Photographer Carl de Souza (Guardian: December 2010)

Articles - Guardian: Before Colour: photographer William Eggleston in black-and-white (Guardian: December 2010)

InterviewsAlec Soth (Artcards: 2010)

Features and Essays - NYT: Actors Create 14 Decisive Moments | 14 Actors Acting (NYT Lens: December 2010)

Year in Pictures gallery by Adam Dean…

Features and Essays – Adam Dean: 2010 Year In Pictures (Photographer’s website: December 2010)

I put a link to Palani Mohan’s latest work on Reportage by Getty Images site the other day, and I ended up having a look also at his personal website…

PhotographersPalani Mohan

Also checked Luke Banks’ site, after I saw his work on Telegraph’s Telephoto…

Photographers - Luke Banks

Photographers - Katja Heinemann

AgenciesVII Photo December 2010 Newsletter

CollectivesMJR Weekly Collection 81

Twitter - Terry O’Neill

TwitterKrista Rossow

Blogs – Chip Litherland: 100 things completely right about our jobs (Photographer’s blog: December 2010)

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Features and Essays – Lynsey Addario: Maternal Mortality in Sierra Leone:The Story of Mamma (TIME: June 2010) One woman’s journey from pregnancy to death

Features and Essays – Christopher Morris: A Murder by the Border (TIME: June 2010) Arizona

Features and Essays - Ed Ou: In Cameroon, Samuel Eto’o Reigns as Uncrowned King (TIME: June 2010) Football fever grips the soccer star’s hometown

Articles – BJP: Celebrated British photographer Brian Duffy has died (BJP: June 2010) Duffy’s photos in Telegraph

Features and Essays – Rena Effendi: Azerbaijan Flood Displaces Thousands (Institute: June 2010)

Features and Essays – Nadav Kander: My Body as a Work of Art (More: June 2010)

Features and Essays - Raul Canibano Ercilla: In the Heart and Soul of Cuba (NYT Lens: June 2010)

Photoraphers – Raul Canibano Ercilla : website

Articles - NYT: photographer Peter Sekaer : Finding Other America in Slums and on Farms (NYT: June 2010)

Interviews - Zoriah Miller (PetaPixel: June 2010)

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