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Doofus writes "Masao Yoshida, director of the Daichii Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan, has passed away. Colleagues and politicos in Japan praised his disobedience during the post-tsunami meltdown and credited him with preventing much more widespread and intense damage. From the article: 'On March 12, a day after the tsunami, Mr. Yoshida ignored an order from Tepco headquarters to stop pumping seawater into a reactor to try and cool it because of concerns that ocean water would corrode the equipment. Tepco initially said it would penalize Mr. Yoshida even though Sakae Muto, then a vice president at the utility, said it was a technically appropriate decision. Mr. Yoshida received no more than a verbal reprimand after then-Prime Minister Naoto Kan defended the plant chief, the Yomiuri newspaper reported. "I bow in respect for his leadership and decision-making," Kan said Tuesday in a message posted on his Twitter account.'"

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Esther Schindler writes "If you ever needed evidence that Isaac Asimov was a genius at extrapolating future technology from limited data, you'll enjoy this 1964 article in which he predicts what we'll see at the 2014 world's fair. For instance: "Robots will neither be common nor very good in 2014, but they will be in existence. The I.B.M. exhibit at the present fair has no robots but it is dedicated to computers, which are shown in all their amazing complexity, notably in the task of translating Russian into English. If machines are that smart today, what may not be in the works 50 years hence? It will be such computers, much miniaturized, that will serve as the "brains" of robots. In fact, the I.B.M. building at the 2014 World's Fair may have, as one of its prime exhibits, a robot housemaid*large, clumsy, slow- moving but capable of general picking-up, arranging, cleaning and manipulation of various appliances. It will undoubtedly amuse the fairgoers to scatter debris over the floor in order to see the robot lumberingly remove it and classify it into 'throw away' and 'set aside.' (Robots for gardening work will also have made their appearance.)" It's really fun (and sometimes sigh-inducing) to see where he was accurate and where he wasn't. And, of course, the whole notion that we'd have a world's fair is among the inaccurate predictions."

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the_newsbeagle writes "Most of the researchers who work on flexible electronics imagine putting their materials to use in flexible displays, like a rollable, foldable iPad that you could cram in your pocket. And I'm not saying that wouldn't be cool. But researcher Takao Someya of the University of Tokyo has a different idea: He wants his ultra-thin, ultra-flexible electronics to be used as bionic skin. Someya and other researchers have created circuits that stick to your skin, and that can stretch and bend as you move your body. These materials are still in the labs, but the scientists imagine many uses for them. For example, if a synthetic skin is studded with pressure and heat sensors, it could be used as a lifelike covering for prosthetic limbs. There are also potential biomedical applications: The e-skin could discreetly monitor an outpatient's vital signs, and send the data to a nearby computer. The article includes a short video showing Someya's material in action."

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Illustration is one of those wonderfully versatile forms of mark-making which comes in every different guise imaginable – from dynamic, fast-paced and full of action, to slow, deliberate and painstakingly detailed – so it’s more or less a given that the very best illustrators out there will have mastered as many different styles as possible. This is where Josh Cochran comes in.

He belongs to that rare school of visual storytellers who tend to find success as editorial illustrators, whose handle on their medium is so complete that they are able to convey complex, multi-layered messages through a single image. Whether that be for an article in a financial magazine about how companies roll content from one place to another, or an enormous mural spanning whole walls created in response to a collection of life goals and dreams, no idea is too abstract for Josh’s talents. if you don’t believe me, here’s an update on what he’s been setting his masterful mind to of late.

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crudelyerased6FINAL

Have you ever been lost in a shopping mall as a kid? Gone to Disneyland and shook Mickey's hand? You probaby just imagined it. False memories, in which you believe an imagined or distorted memory to be fact, are more common than people think. They constitute a neurological no man's land where the brain's creative capacity for reimagination collides with the grotesque flotsam of the subconscious, creating a memory that blurs the line between real and unreal.

For the past nine months, experimental artist and Wellcome Trust Engagement Fellow A.R. Hopwood has been crowdsourcing examples of this phenomenon for The False Memory Archive. Hundreds of these accounts, along with video and photographic work inspired by false memories, will be displayed as part of the touring exhibition that will, appropriately enough, culminate in a show at the Freud Museum.

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SEGA AGES PANZER DRAGOON (NEW)

The Saturn had a plethora of original Sega titles such as the epoch defining Panzer Dragoon. This PS2 version includes the original Saturn game along with an updated hi-res version along with some bonus extras of artwork and cut sequences in the Pandoras Box - which as the name suggests requires opening. The stirring orchestral score sounds splendid on the PS2 and gameplay is just a refreshing as the Dragoon swoops through beautifully textured valleys, skirting the ravine edge. Whilst gameplay is on the rails the 360 degree firing range makes it feel unrestricted as you fly against hordes of critters to drop them from the sky. The controls remain faithful with the ability to scan around checking for sneaky assailants. Jaw dropping visuals and a story whose threads gently wrap around you before you realise you are cocooned in it. Saturn veterans will lap this up and hopefully the uninitiated will see whats got everyone in a flap.

A fine review of Sega's inspired flight of fancy...

Publisher: Sega
Game Type: Shoot Em Up

Console: PS2

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Capcom, like essentially all major Japanese game publishers these days, is making a major push into free-to-play titles. Deep Down, the company's big PlayStation 4 release, is a F2P role-playing game, a first for Capcom on consoles. It's a pretty bold experiment for the company, and one that producer Yoshinori Ono is prepared to face some criticism for.

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