Skip navigation
Help

Liberia

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
(author unknown)

Al Bello’s photograph of a springboard diver entering the water is one of many great pictures being auctioned for the Chris Hondros Fund Benefit. Bidding ends tonight. See more prints in the auction here: http://paddle8.com/auctions/chrishondrosfund

The Chris Hondros Fund was founded in honor of the Getty Images photographer who died on assignment in Misurata, Libya, in 2011. Chris had covered many of the world’s conflicts since the late 1990s, including the wars in Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Afghanistan and Iraq. The fund seeks to raise awareness about the work of photojournalists through lecture series, exhibitions and grants.

Caption: Christina Loukas of the United States competes in the Women’s 3m Springboard Diving Semifinal on Day 8 of the London 2012 Olympic Games at the Aquatics Centre on August 4, 2012 in London, England. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

0
Your rating: None

This SlideShowPro photo gallery requires the Flash Player plugin and a web browser with JavaScript enabled.

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

Kadir van Lohuizen

Vía PanAm

play this essay

 

In 2011, Kadir started a visual investigation on migration in the Americas.

In 12 months, he traveled along the Pan-American Highway from Terra del Fuego in Patagonia to Deadhorse in Northern Alaska.
Vía PanAm is a unique social documentary MULTI MEDIA project made into an iApp for the iPad.

 

Bio

Before Kadir van Lohuizen (The Netherlands, 1963) became a photographer, he was a sailor and started a shelter for homeless and drug addicts in Holland. He was also an activist in the Dutch squatter movement.

He started to work as a professional freelance photojournalist in 1988 covering the Intifada. In the years following, he worked in many conflict areas in Africa, such as Angola, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, Liberia and the DR of Congo. From 1990 to 1994 he covered the transition in South Africa from apartheid to democracy.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Kadir covered social issues in different corners of the former empire. He also went to North Korea and Mongolia. In 1997 he embarked on a big project to travel along the seven rivers of the world, from source to mouth, covering daily life along these lifelines. The project resulted in the book “Rivers” and “Aderen” (Mets & Schilt).

In 2000 and 2002 Kadir was a jury member of the World Press Photo contest.

In 2004 he went back to Angola, Sierra Leone and the DR of Congo to portray the diamond industry, following the diamonds from the mines to the consumer markets in the Western world. The exhibitions that resulted from this project were not only shown in Europe and the USA, but also in the mining areas of Congo, Angola and Sierra Leone. The photo book “Diamond Matters, the diamond industry” was published by Mets & Schilt (Holland), Dewi Lewis (UK) and Umbrage editions (USA) and awarded with the prestigious Dutch Dick Scherpenzeel Prize for best reporting on the developing world and a World Press Photo Award.

In that same year, Kadir initiated a photo project together with Stanley Greene and six other photographers on the issue of violence against women in the world.

In 2006 he launched a magazine called Katrina – An Unnatural Disaster, The Issue # 1, in collaboration with Stanley Greene, Thomas Dworzak and Paolo Pellegrin with an essay by Jon Lee Anderson.

After hurricane Katrina destroyed New Orleans, he has made several trips to the USA to document the aftermath of the storm. In the summer of 2010, to mark the fifth commemoration of Hurricane Katrina, Kadir exhibited images of Katrina’s devastation and the aftermath in a truck-exhibition that drove from Houston to New Orleans, a project in collaboration with Stanley Greene.

Kadir is a frequent lecturer and photography teacher; he’s a member and co-founder of NOOR picture agency and foundation and is based in Amsterdam.

 

Related links

Vía PanAm

Twitter

NOOR

 

0
Your rating: None

Leading up to the conviction of the former president of Liberia, Charles G. Taylor, Finbarr O'Reilly traveled to Sierra Leone for Reuters to capture a country now at peace, but impoverished.

0
Your rating: None

NEWSPAPER BOMBED
NEWSPAPER BOMBED: Policemen stood outside the offices of This Day Newspapers in Abuja, Nigeria, Thursday. The paper, one of Nigeria’s leading publications, was rocked by bombs that killed two security men and a suicide bomber and injured five of support staffers. (Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP/Getty Images)

FIGHTING FOR A MEDAL
FIGHTING FOR A MEDAL: France’s Sarah Loko, in blue, fought against France’s Automne Pavia in the women’s 57 kg category bronze match at the European Judo Championships in Chelyabinsk, Russia, Thursday. Pavia won. (Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images)

AT AN END
AT AN END: A victim of violence instigated by Liberian ex-leader Charles Taylor watched his trial Thursday inside the Special Court in Freetown, Sierra Leone, Thursday. Mr. Taylor was convicted of arming an insurgency that committed war crimes in Sierra Leone. (Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images)

REMEMBERING
REMEMBERING: Valentina Lopatyuk, 79, cried Thursday at the grave of her son, Viktor Lopatyuk, 29, at the Mitino Cemetery a memorial in Moscow for the victims of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Russians were marking the 26th anniversary of the world’s worst nuclear accident. (Ivan Sekretarev/Associated Press)

FIGHTING THE FLU
FIGHTING THE FLU: Indonesian agriculture officials euthanized chickens suspected of being infected with bird flu in Denpasar, Bali, Thursday. An eight-year-old boy in the region died of a suspected case of bird flu on Tuesday. (Made Nagi/European Pressphoto Agency)

0
Your rating: None